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The Salt
2:04 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Taste Of Grandma's Kitchen: We Hack An Old Ketchup Recipe

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 1:23 pm

Editor's Note: This post is part of All Things Considered's Found Recipes project.

Although Heinz may dominate the ketchup scene, 100 years ago it wasn't uncommon to make your own at home. So why bother doing so now, when you can just buy the bottles off the shelf? At least one man, Jim Ledvinka, was motivated by nostalgia.

"Oh, yes โ€” we remember my grandmother making ketchup. And it was quite a sight to behold," Ledvinka says.

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Health Care
1:59 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Former Insurance Exec Offers An Insider's Look At Obamacare

Pill bottles
iStockphoto.com

On March 23, 2010, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was signed into law. It's aimed at making health insurance more affordable and reducing the overall costs of health care.

Some parts of the law have already gone into effect: Insurers can't impose lifetime dollar limits on essential benefits, like hospital stays; children can stay on their parents' plan until they're 26; children with pre-existing conditions can't be denied coverage; and all new insurance plans must cover preventive care and medical screenings.

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Report: Microsoft Helped NSA, FBI Get Around Encryption

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announces Microsoft's purchase of Skype in 2011, in San Francisco.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:53 am

The latest in The Guardian's series of reports on secret U.S. electronic surveillance efforts claims to detail the extent of Microsoft's cooperation with the National Security Agency, with the tech giant reportedly allowing agents to circumvent its own encryption system to spy on email and chats, as well as its cloud-based storage service.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
1:34 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

It's All Politics, July 11, 2013

Andrew Burton Getty Images
  • Listen to the Roundup

Yes, Egypt is being torn apart and the immigration bill is in trouble. But that pales when you consider the fact that Eliot Spitzer IS RUNNING FOR NEW YORK CITY COMPTROLLER!! Fear not, NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving are all over it.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
12:45 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Death And Tax Evasion: The Strange Case Of Sergei Magnitsky

Sergei Magnitsky's mother, Nataliya Magnitskaya, holds a photo of her late son in 2009.
Alexander Zemlianichenko Associated Press

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:32 pm

A Russian court found whistle-blower Sergei Magnitsky guilty of tax evasion on Thursday, ending a convoluted case that caused a diplomatic row between Moscow and Washington. It gets even more bizarre given the fact that the man on trial died in 2009.

The posthumous conviction is unprecedented in modern times โ€“ even in a country with a history of show trials. But it's not entirely unheard of throughout the ages.

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All Songs Considered
12:43 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

The Good Listener: When You Make Someone A Mix, What Do They Owe You?

Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 8:22 am

We get a lot of mail at NPR Music, and amid the shampoo samples we accidentally tossed into the fireplace is a slew of smart questions about how music fits into our lives โ€” and, this week, the etiquette surrounding the giving and receiving of mix CDs.

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Shots - Health News
12:38 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

For Youths, Fewer Homicides But Still Many Deaths

Homicide remains a leading cause of death for young people, even as rates drop. In Chicago, a teenage boy grieves next to a memorial where Ashley Hardmon, 19, was shot and killed on July 2. Gunmen fired while she was chatting with friends.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 7:14 am

Homicide rates among teenagers and young adults have dropped to the lowest level in 30 years, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's good news, but it still means about 4,800 young people under age 25 were murdered in 2010.

Teenagers and young adults remain more likely to be killed than older adults, and homicide is a leading cause of death in the young, behind motor vehicle accidents.

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Movie Interviews
12:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

Fatal Shooting At 'Fruitvale Station' Hits Home For Film's Stars

Academy Award-winning actress Octavia Spencer plays the mother of Oscar Grant in the film Fruitvale Station.
Ron Koeberer The Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:18 pm

The new film Fruitvale Station tells the true story of a young, unarmed black man who was shot and killed by an Oakland, Calif., transit police officer early on New Year's Day 2009. The death of Oscar Grant sparked days of riots and unrest in Oakland, and lots of conversations about relationships between citizens and the police. Fruitvale Station follows the 24 hours leading up to the shooting. The film won critical acclaim at this year's Sundance Film Festival, taking home the Grand Jury Prize and Audience Award. It opens in select theaters on July 12.

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Parallels
12:15 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

China Unveils Massive Building โ€” With Fake Beach, Fake Sun

A view of the New Century Global Center in Chengdu, China. The structure โ€” located in a suburb of Chengdu, in southwest China's Sichuan province โ€” is home to an indoor beach and a faux Mediterranean village.
Barcroft Media/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:07 pm

The Chinese are calling the New Century Global Center, which opened in late June in Chengdu, the world's largest stand-alone structure.

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The Two-Way
12:13 pm
Thu July 11, 2013

True, Blue Planet Found Orbiting Nearby Star

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:37 pm

Move over, Earth. There's another blue planet in town โ€” or at least in our corner of the Milky Way.

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope deduced for the first time the atmospheric hue of a planet outside our own solar system โ€” and it turns out to be a "deep cobalt blue."

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Parallels
11:58 am
Thu July 11, 2013

If Egypt's Political Crisis Looks Bad, Check Out The Economy

Egyptian drivers wait in long lines outside a gas station in Cairo on June 26. Along with a stuttering economy, traffic-clogging street protests and a crime wave, fuel shortages have come to symbolize the disorder of the post-Mubarak Egypt.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:00 pm

The spotlight on Egypt has focused on the the political fallout from the military coup that toppled an elected but deeply unpopular government. But if you think Egypt's politics are a mess, just consider the economy.

Tourism, a major revenue generator, has been hurting since the Arab uprisings of 2011 that toppled Hosni Mubarak. Foreign investment has shriveled. Unemployment in many industries has soared. Inflation has risen, making everyday goods more expensive. And there's a black market in currency and fuel.

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Bernanke's Comments Lift Stocks To Record Highs

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 3:29 pm

Stocks surged Thursday after the chief of the Federal Reserve sent signals that the central bank wasn't in a hurry to stop helping the economy. When the markets closed, the Standard & Poor's 500 Index was at a record high. Other U.S. indexes were also up, including the Dow Jones Industrial Average, which rose nearly 170 points to a record 15,460.92.

Update at 5 p.m. ET: We've updated some figures in this post to reflect the markets' closing.

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The Two-Way
11:41 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Why We Aren't Assuming Snowden Is On That Jet To Havana

The more northerly route that Aeroflot 150 normally takes.
FlightAware.com

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:57 pm

Twitter has been abuzz with speculation that "NSA leaker" Edward Snowden is on Aeroflot Flight 150, which is headed to Havana from Moscow as we write.

What's the supposed evidence?

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A Blog Supreme
11:36 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Crystalline New Music For Flutes And Mallets

Nicole Mitchell.
Kristi Sutton Elias Courtesy of the artist

If you look at the cover art of new albums by flutists Nicole Mitchell and Anna Webber, you'll see crystals. On Percussive Mechanics, Webber depicts a handful of glass shards carefully arranged as if to create an abstract sculpture. On Aquarius, Mitchell wraps herself in a sting of icicle lights โ€” the kind you see hanging around Christmastime โ€” which is appropriate, as her band is called Ice Crystal.

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Zimmerman Jury Can Consider Lesser Charge, Judge Says

George Zimmerman in court on Thursday.
Gary W. Green/pool Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 2:32 pm

The jury weighing the guilt or innocence of the man accused in the shooting death of Florida teen Trayvon Martin can consider convicting George Zimmerman on a lesser charge of manslaughter, the judge ruled Thursday morning.

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The Two-Way
10:24 am
Thu July 11, 2013

DNA Ends Years Of Doubt On Boston Strangler Victim, Police Say

Mary Sullivan, seen here in a photo displayed at a 2000 news conference, was the final victim of the Boston Strangler, officials said Thursday. They plan more DNA tests on the evidence.
William Plowman AP

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 12:12 pm

The Boston Strangler's final victim has been identified, according to police who say DNA tests have linked Albert DeSalvo, who confessed to being the serial killer, to the death of Mary Sullivan in 1964. The authorities will exhume DeSalvo's body to get "a biological sample" that might provide a 100 percent match.

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JazzSet with Dee Dee Bridgewater
10:07 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Lewis Nash Quintet, Kurt Elling On JazzSet

Drummer Lewis Nash performs at the 2012 Newport Jazz Festival.
Erik Jacobs for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 1:23 pm

There are three stages at the Newport Jazz Festival. At least two are always running simultaneously. Given the surfeit of options, it's rare to hear a complete set. The question begins to nag: Should be we somewhere else? And away you go, leaving a work in progress to make sure you don't miss one getting underway.

But sometimes if you choose a spot on the lawn and stay put, the juxtaposition of two bands delivers a fine festival experience. Sunday morning, August 5, 2012, on the Quad Stage is such a time.

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Race
10:04 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Study: Whites Think Black People Feel Less Pain

Racial disparities exist, but what causes them can be complicated. Harvard anthropology student Jason Silverstein says it has to do with a lack of empathy. Host Michel Michel Martin talks with Silverstein about a Slate article he wrote titled, 'I Don't Feel Your Pain.'

Race
10:04 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Does It Help To Call People Out On Their Hate?

Brittney Cooper was on an airplane when, out of the corner of her eye, she caught alarming words on her seatmate's phone. The fellow passenger was texting a message about Cooper's race and weight. Host Michel Martin talks to Cooper about what she did next, and what she was hoping to accomplish.

U.S.
10:04 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Is Owning A Home Still A Good American Dream?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program, we're going to talk about something that might have happened to you. Somebody says something personally insulting about you, you heard it. You probably also had a moment where you weren't quite sure what to do about it. We'll talk with a woman who found herself in that very situation, and we'll find out what she did. That's later. But first, we want to continue our conversation with the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Shaun Donovan.

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Economy
10:04 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Housing Sec.: 'We Forgot How to Make Safe, Plain Vanilla Loans'

You may have noticed that houses are selling a little faster and prices are going up. But not everyone is feeling the benefits. Host Michel Martin speaks with U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Shaun Donovan, about what happened, and what's next in the housing sector.

The Two-Way
9:23 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Def Con Hacking Conference Puts Feds In 'Time-Out'

An image of the site promoting Def Con 21, a large annual gathering of hackers in Las Vegas. The meeting's leader is asking federal workers to stay away from this year's event.
Def Con

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 11:02 am

As one of the world's largest gatherings of hackers, the Def Con conference has long welcomed experts from the security industry and the U.S. government, along with academics and hackers. But this year, Def Con's leader is asking federal workers to skip the event, due to recent revelations about U.S. electronic surveillance.

The request was announced Wednesday in a message titled, "Feds, we need some time apart," which was posted at the Def Con site. It reads:

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The Two-Way
9:11 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Paula Deen Comic To Be Published In Fall

The cover of Bluewater Productions' upcoming "Female Force: Paula Deen" comic book.
Courtesy of Bluewater Productions

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:39 am

Paula Deen, the celebrity cook who has seen her TV shows and corporate sponsorships disappear in recent weeks because of reports about her past use of the N-word, is going to be the star of a comic book this fall, a publisher says.

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Code Switch
9:07 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Dueling Stereotypes: Bad Asian Drivers, Good At Everything

Asians are bad drivers but can navigate roundabouts like this one in Shanghai, eh?
Tauno Tรตhk via Flickr

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 2:09 pm

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Code Switch
8:42 am
Thu July 11, 2013

'East Los High': Not Just Another Teen Soap

Jacob and Vanessa are crowned king and queen of the homecoming dance on the first episode of gritty high school drama East Los High.
East Los High Productions, LLC

Despite the fact that it's been generating a lot of buzz, Devious Maids is just not that interesting. Five Latina maids โ€” is it a landmark for Latina actresses or another example of how the media stereotype Latinos? Either way, the relationship between hypersexualized domestic workers and their pretentious employers does not make for compelling television.

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NPR Cities: Urban Life In The 21st Century
8:17 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Join The Twitter Roundtable: What Makes A City 'Smart'?

Use #nprcities to join a Twitter conversation about smart cities and urban innovation.
NPR

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:10 pm

This year, the NPR Cities Project is covering the concept of "smart cities": how cities worldwide are experimenting with technology to solve all sorts of urban problems. Please join us as we tackle the issue of smart cities with a live Twitter chat on Thursday, July 11, from 11 a.m. to 12 noon EDT.

Policymakers hope implementing technological solutions to urban issues will help cities become more efficient, more user-friendly and more environmentally sustainable.

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The Salt
8:14 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Hipsters Off The Hook: The Truth Behind Abandoned Backyard Chickens

Don't leave me: Many cities allow hens but not roosters.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 15, 2013 9:15 am

From the headlines this week, I almost expected to see a hen clucking outside NPR's headquarters this morning.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Jobless Claims Rose Last Week

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:55 am

There were 360,000 first-time claims for unemployment benefits filed last week, up 16,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

The "four-week moving average," which gives a sense of the recent trend, "was 351,750, an increase of 6,000 from the previous week's revised average of 345,750."

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The Two-Way
7:21 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Country Star Randy Travis In Critical Condition After Stroke

Country singer Randy Travis at the CMA Music Festival in Nashville on June 7.
Terry Wyatt UPI/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:58 am

Country singer Randy Travis is in critical condition at a hospital in Plano, Texas, after suffering a stroke, the Baylor Health Care System says.

He underwent surgery Wednesday night to relieve pressure on his brain, the hospital system adds. Word of his stroke came that evening.

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Parallels
6:38 am
Thu July 11, 2013

What Should The U.S. Be Doing In Egypt?

Some Egyptian protesters felt the U.S. ambassador to Egypt, Anne Patterson, was too close to the recently deposed president, Mohammed Morsi. Demonstrators in Cairo carry banners denouncing her on June 30, three days before Morsi was ousted by Egypt's military.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 1:25 pm

Egypt's crisis has ignited a familiar debate over U.S. foreign policy where the combatants cluster around two basic viewpoints: The U.S. is doing too little, and the U.S. is doing too much.

So which is it? Is America shrewdly orchestrating events behind the scenes, or is it just an impotent bystander in the Egyptian drama? It depends on whom you ask.

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