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5:31 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Target Apologizes For Poor Choice Of Words

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Target has apologized for a poor choice of words. Susan Clemens was looking at a gray dress on the company's website, when she noticed how the color was described. Regular sizes were dark heather gray. Plus sizes - in the exact, same color - became manatee gray.

Manatees are walrus-like animals. They're also known as sea cows. Clemens tweeted her disgust, and it went viral. The company says from now on, they're just going to go with gray.

The Two-Way
5:29 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Book News: Chile Prepares To Exhume Pablo Neruda's Remains

Keystone Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:04 am
Mon April 8, 2013

North Korea To Shut Jointly Run Factories, May Test Missile

Do not enter: Barriers, including spikes, at the Military Demarcation Line (MDL) near the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) in the Gyeonggi province, South Korea.
Jeon Heon-kyun EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:28 am

  • Louisa Lim, reporting on the NPR Newscast

Monday's developments on the Korean Peninsula, where tensions have been running even higher than usual in recent weeks:

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New In Paperback
5:03 am
Mon April 8, 2013

April 8-14: Impeachment, Mourning, Sobriety And Soccer

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
4:26 am
Mon April 8, 2013

South Sudan Resumes Oil Production

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

After a 15-month hiatus, the world's newest nation is pumping oil again. It's a key step toward mending relations with Sudan, its former civil war foe. And it's a crucial step if South Sudan is to avoid economic collapse.

Asia
3:34 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Visitors To North Korea See Nothing Out Of The Ordinary

Patrick Thornquist, a teacher from Chicago, says he didn't encounter any anti-American sentiment in the North. "You're trying to find that balance between what your media tell you and what they're telling you, because they're very far off," he said.
Louisa Lim NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:22 pm

North Korea's recent campaign of bluster and escalation seems to be reaching new heights, but visitors to the reclusive country say there are few signs the capital is anywhere near a war footing.

International TV broadcasters have been repeatedly showing tanks trundling through Pyongyang's Kim Il Sung Square in a demonstration of North Korean national power.

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Global Health
3:01 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Research:Dengue Underestimated By World Health Organization

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The tropical disease dengue is on the move, spreading far outside the tropics. There have been major outbreaks in places like Portugal, Russia and Australia. It even popped up in Florida. Now, according to a new paper in the journal Nature, scientists have been seriously underestimating the amount of dengue around the globe. The study estimates that there's three to four times more dengue infections each year than what was reported by the World Health Organization. NPR's Jason Beaubien has more.

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Europe
3:01 am
Mon April 8, 2013

J.R.R. Tolkien's Ring On Display At Estate's Exhibit

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In his epic saga of Middle Earth, the English author J.R.R. Tolkien creates a vivid land of elves and dwarfs, wizards and hobbits and at the center of it all is the one ring of power.

(SOUNDBITE FROM FILM "LORD OF THE RING: FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING")

IAN MCKELLEN: (as Gandalf) Evil is stirring in Mordor. The ring has awoken. It's served its master's call.

GREENE: Yeah, this is quite a ring. It can make you invisible. It also can create separation anxiety.

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Latin America
3:01 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Chilean Poet Neruda's Remains To Be Exhumed In Murder Probe

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Chile today, the famed poet Pablo Neruda's remains are being exhumed. The official cause of the Nobel Laureate's death in 1973 was cancer. But a new investigation is looking into whether he might have been murdered by the regime of Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Here's NPR's South American correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: Outside of Chile, Pablo Neruda is better known for verses like this.

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Business
3:01 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Earlier this year, all 787 Dreamliners were grounded after overheating issues caused by its batteries led to electrical failures in two separate incidents. Boeing is analyzing flight data and submitting materials to the Federal Aviation Administration.

NPR Story
2:48 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Religious Tensions Escalate In Egypt Amid Violence

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Steve Inskeep is reporting from Venezuela this week as that nation holds a presidential election. I'm David Greene in Washington. Over the weekend, Egypt suffered the worse religious violence it has seen since President Mohamed Morsi came to power last year. At least six people were killed, including five Coptic Christians. More than 80 others were wounded.

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NPR Story
2:48 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Foreign Service Officer Died Doing What She Loved

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Over the weekend in Afghanistan, a suicide bomber took the life of five Americans. They were on a mission to deliver books to an Afghan school. They were military personnel, a Defense Department civilian, and the first State Department Foreign Service officer to be killed in Afghanistan.

She was 25-year-old Anne Smedinghoff. NPR's Sean Carberry, in Kabul, sent this remembrance.

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NPR Story
2:48 am
Mon April 8, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

Lilly Pulitzer married into the famous Pulitzer media family but her own fame came from her line of screaming pink, lime and fluorescent yellow shift dresses.

Law
1:24 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Osama Bin Laden's Son-In-Law Set To Appear In N.Y. Court

Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith (center), pleaded not guilty to a charge of conspiracy to kill Americans on March 8. He is set to appear in a federal court Monday.
Elizabeth Williams AP

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:32 am

Osama bin Laden's son-in-law and former al-Qaida spokesman Sulaiman Abu Ghaith is expected to appear in a New York courtroom Monday afternoon.

Abu Ghaith was captured by U.S. officials in February, and his arrest is considered important not just because he was so close to bin Laden, but also because the Obama administration has decided to try him in a federal court instead of using a military commission at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

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It's All Politics
1:23 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Some Gun Control Opponents Cite Fear Of Government Tyranny

Hundreds of gun owners and enthusiasts attend a rally at the Connecticut Capitol in Hartford on Jan. 19.
Rick Hartford MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 9:35 am

As the Senate returns from a two-week spring recess Monday, topping its agenda is legislation to try to curb the kind of gun violence that took the lives of 20 first-graders in Connecticut last December.

Recent polls show broad popular support for enhanced background checks and bans on military-style guns and ammunition. But many members of Congress side with gun-rights advocates who oppose such measures.

And those advocates are increasingly making the case that Americans need guns to fight government tyranny.

'A Fringe Idea' Goes Mainstream

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It's All Politics
1:21 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Why Politicians Want Children To Be Seen And Heard

President Obama signs a series of executive orders on gun control Jan. 16 surrounded by children who wrote letters to the White House about gun violence. They are, from left, Hinna Zeejah, Taejah Goode, Julia Stokes and Grant Fritz.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 5:36 pm

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The Salt
1:20 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Vermont Finds High-Tech Ways To Sap More Money From Maple Trees

John Silloway fixes maple sap lines in Randolph, Vt., in February 2011.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 2:35 pm

In Vermont, maple syrup is growing jobs and allowing farmers to make a profit.

When most people imagine maple syrup production, they think of buckets hanging from trees collecting sap. But these days, most of that sap is collected by pipeline and vacuum pumps.

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Business
1:19 am
Mon April 8, 2013

What Drives Us? Car Sharing Reflects Cultural Shift

Car2Go vehicles lined up in Washington, D.C., as the company prepared to launch service there last year. The car sharing service is also in Europe and other American cities, including Seattle; Austin, Texas; Miami; and Portland, Ore.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:09 am

As car sharing continues to gain traction among American drivers, Car2Go is one company benefiting from the changing way we use cars.

Seattleite David Stewart doesn't own a car. Instead, the managing partner of a small social media company relies on Car2Go for getting around.

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The Record
1:18 am
Mon April 8, 2013

The Wu-Tang Clan's 20-Year Plan

The Wu-Tang Clan. Clockwise from left: Ol' Dirty Bastard, the GZA, the RZA, Inspectah Deck, Masta Killa, Raekwon and Ghostface Killah. Center, from left, Method Man and U-God.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:26 pm

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Listen Up To Smarter, Smaller Hearing Aids

Composer Richard Einhorn lost most of his hearing several years ago, but that hasn't held him back, thanks to state-of-the-art digital hearing aids.
Kevin Rivoli AP

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:17 am

One day in the fall of 2010, composer Richard Einhorn woke up and realized there was something horribly wrong with his hearing.

"There was an enormous, violent buzzing in my ears," he says. "And I realized that my right ear had gone completely deaf."

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The Two-Way
3:46 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Broadcasters Struggle To Tap Into The 'Zero TV' Crowd

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:39 am

Broadcasters will convene this week in Las Vegas to discuss how to win back the "Zero TV Crowd": a rapidly growing demographic of people who don't subscribe to cable or satellite TV services.

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U.S.
3:29 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

After Years Of Struggle, Veteran Chooses To End His Life

Tomas Young was paralyzed from the chest down during his deployment to Iraq. Since then, his health has only deteriorated. He has decided to refuse care and end his life, and his wife, Claudia Cuellar, says she respects his wishes.
Frank Morris for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:19 am

After a dozen years at war, an estimated 2 million active-duty service members will have returned home by the end of 2013. Some reintegrate without much struggle, but for others it's not so easy. The psychological wounds of war can sometimes prove to be just as fatal as the physical ones.

For injured veterans such as Tomas Young, life is a daily struggle. But this Iraq War veteran, who says his physical and emotional pain is unbearable, has decided to end his life.

At War

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Around the Nation
3:04 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Getting Lost In The Prison System

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 3:42 pm

Ten million people funnel in and out of our nation's jails and prisons every year. And every year, some of them get lost. Recently there have been two high-profile cases of such inmates — one who got out years too early, and one who stayed years too long. Both cases had disastrous consequences, but there's no easy fix to this problem. This story originally ran on Morning Edition on April 5.

Sports
1:38 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

A PR Person's How-To Guide For Spinning College Sports

The leg injury to Louisville guard Kevin Ware has been a rallying point for fans nationwide. But the University of Louisville is hoping to avoid looking like they're taking advantage.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 3:42 pm

The Final Four games at the NCAA men's college basketball tournament on Saturday were just the latest in a week that's been eventful — and unpredictable.

Bettina Cornwell, a marketing expert at the University of Oregon, says universities and colleges like to be ready with their public relations strategies. But sometimes you just can't plan for sports.

How To Be Cinderella

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Television
1:38 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Pirates Steal 'Game Of Thrones': Why HBO Doesn't Mind

Richard Madden plays Robb Stark in HBO's Game of Thrones.
Helen Sloan HBO

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 3:42 pm

More than 1 million fans illegally downloaded the first episode of Game of Thrones Season 3 this week, within 24 hours of its premiere.

That set a record, according to TorrentFreak, a blog that reports the latest trends on file-sharing. The blog also named the popular HBO series the most illegally downloaded television show of 2012.

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Movie Interviews
1:21 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

'Ginger And Rosa': A Study Of Women's Relationships

Best friends Rosa (Alice Englert, left) and Ginger (Elle Fanning) are nearly torn apart by the political and social changes of the 1960s.
A24

Originally published on Sun April 7, 2013 3:42 pm

British filmmaker Sally Potter gained worldwide attention with her 1992 film Orlando. Like all of her movies, it was unconventional in its story and structure. Her new film, Ginger & Rosa, is more realistic and direct.

It's also got a high-profile cast that includes Annette Bening, Oliver Platt, Christina Hendricks and young Elle Fanning. They all play Britons during the fateful Cold War year of 1962, when the Cuban missile crisis had the world thinking the unthinkable: That a nuclear war was about to begin between the Soviet Union and the United States.

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The Picture Show
1:21 pm
Sun April 7, 2013

Meeting Florida's Seminoles Through Rediscovered Photos

The widow of Tigertail, a leader during the Second Seminole War.
Julian Dimock Collection American Museum of Natural History

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 3:07 pm

The Ah-Tah-Thi-Ki Seminole Indian Museum on the Big Cypress Seminole Reservation in Florida has a new exhibit that gives patrons a rare glimpse into the past.

Taken by photographer Julian Dimock during a 1910 expedition across the undrained and untamed landscape of tropical wetlands and cypress hammocks of southern Florida, the photos show everyday activities and portraits of the Seminole people he encountered.

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The Salt
10:50 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Apparently, Some People Can't Be Bothered With Food

Nestle makes a range of products under the Boost brand marketed as liquid nutritional supplements or meal replacements. But nutritionists say they can't compete with all the benefits of eating real food.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 10:37 am

We're accustomed to offbeat food ideas here at The Salt. But even we had to pause over recent headlines about a guy who bragged about finding a way around eating.

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sun April 7, 2013

Young Staffer's Death Binds U.S. Embassy, Journalists

An Afghan police officer stands guard near the site where a suicide bomb attack took the life of five Americans, including 25-year-old Foreign Service officer Anne Smedinghoff, in Afghanistan on Saturday.
Arghand Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 8:50 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Remembering Anne Smedinghoff

Death comes with the territory when you work in conflict zones. On sometimes a daily basis, those of us who have worked in Iraq and Afghanistan in particular have filed stories with headlines like, "Four troops killed during insurgent attack," or "IED kills 10 civilians and wounds six."

It's a blur of numbers and uniforms. When we get word of an incident, we scramble to determine what happened, the nationality of the victims and any other pertinent details. But it's all very anonymous and impersonal, most of the time. It's reporting. It's work.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun April 7, 2013

In A Vivid Memoir Of Life In Pakistan, A Vortex Of Tragedies

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 10:15 am

Rajesh Parameswaran is the author of I Am An Executioner: Love Stories.

Sara Suleri Goodyear's heartbreaking 1989 memoir of life in Pakistan, Meatless Days, circles backward and forward in time and space, from Lahore to Connecticut and around again. The author renounces plot in favor of an intimate, impressionistic survey of her family's tragic history.

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