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The Two-Way
5:20 am
Tue April 9, 2013

North Korea's Warnings More Boring Than Alarming To Those In South

Two women sit at a cafe Monday in central Seoul, South Korea. While North Korea has been issuing threats on a daily basis, many South Koreans say they're more bored than worried.
Lee Jae-Won Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 11:25 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': Frank Langfitt reports from Seoul

There were more ominous-sounding words from North Korea on Tuesday. Pyongyang warned tourists and foreign companies in South Korea to leave for their own safety because a nuclear war may be imminent.

It was the latest in a string of threats in recent days.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Book News: Margaret Thatcher Authorized A Posthumous Biography

Britain's then-Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher at the Tory Party Conference in Blackpool, England, in 1981.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 6:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
4:51 am
Tue April 9, 2013

3 Things To Know About Louisville's Basketball Championship

The Louisville Cardinals celebrated after beating Michigan 82-76 in the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship at the Georgia Dome in Atlanta.
Mark Cornelison MCT /Landov

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:00 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': David Greene and Mike Pesca talk about Louisville's win

By beating Michigan 82-76 Monday night in Atlanta, Louisville won this year's Division I men's basketball championship.

In winning:

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Business
3:18 am
Tue April 9, 2013

BP Begins Its Defense Of 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In a courtroom in New Orleans, the oil giant BP has begun presenting its defense in a case connected to the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill. Plaintiffs include individuals and businesses hurt by the spill, as well as and state and federal governments. And they've argued BP was grossly negligent in drilling the deep water well.

But now it's BP's turn. The company argues that contractors who helped it drill should share the blame for the accident, which killed 11 workers and spilled more than four million barrels of oil.

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Asia
2:54 am
Tue April 9, 2013

South Koreans Ignore Threats From The North

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Well, in recent weeks, we have heard that Seoul, the capital of South Korea, will become, quote, a sea of fire. North Korea has said its enemies' windpipes will be, quote, totally cut. Today, North Korea urged tourists and foreign companies to leave South Korea in case of war. These are just some of the threats North Korea has been hurling. But instead of scaring South Koreans, all this blood-thirsty rhetoric seems to be mostly boring them.

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Asia
2:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Pakistan's Campaign Season Is In Full Swing

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

People in Pakistan will go to the polls next month to select a new parliament, and election fever is already building. The country faces chronic energy shortages, deepening economic problems and the specter of violence, as entrenched militants threaten to disrupt the vote. NPR's Julie McCarthy brings us this report from a very active campaign trail in Pakistan.

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Remembrances
2:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Britain's Only Female Prime Minister: Margaret Thatcher

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, as we consider the legacy of Margaret Thatcher, the question arises about her significance as the only woman to serve as British prime minister, and the first woman to lead a government of a major Western nation. Kim Campbell, who briefly served as Canada's first woman prime minister in the early 1990s, put it this way last night on the "PBS NewsHour."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "PBS NEWSHOUR")

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Business
2:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Mexico's Magnificent Mangoes

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right. If you happen to be listening to this program while having a mango for breakfast, there is a good chance that mango is grown in Mexico. Our neighbor to the south says it is now the world's largest exporter of fresh mangos.

India still reigns king in exports of mango products, but as NPR's Carrie Kahn reports, Mexican mangos are now grown at an astonishing rate and the American market is the main target.

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Economy
2:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Margaret Thatcher's Economy

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. Steve Inskeep is in Venezuela, reporting this week on that country's presidential election, and he'll be on the program tomorrow. I'm David Greene.

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Business
2:34 am
Tue April 9, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Money may not buy you everything.

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NPR Story
2:29 am
Tue April 9, 2013

J.C. Penney CEO Johnson Is Forced Out

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with J.C. Penney's revolving door.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: J.C. Penney has ousted its high-profile CEO, Ron Johnson. The retailer recruited Johnson from Apple, to revitalize the company. But since his arrival less than 18 months ago, things at J.C. Penney have only gotten worse.

Here's NPR's Wendy Kaufman.

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NPR Story
2:29 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Administration Urges Europeans To Ease Austerity Measures

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene. President Obama is preparing to send budget plan to Capital Hill this week and Treasury Secretary Jack Lew will be key in selling that plan to Congress.

Right now, Secretary Lew is on another mission: to sell European leaders on the idea of easing austerity to boost economic growth. We reached Secretary Lew in Berlin. Mr. Secretary, welcome back to the program.

SECRETARY JACK LEW: Good to talk to you, David.

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NPR Story
2:29 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Movie Review: 'Trance'

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The director Danny Boyle is best known for the Oscar-winning "Slumdog Millionaire." His latest film is called "Trance," but Los Angeles Times and MORNING EDITION film critic Kenneth Turan was not put under its spell.

KENNETH TURAN, BYLINE: "Trance" begins with the auction of a painting by Goya.

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "TRANCE")

JAMES MCAVOY: (As Simon) Telephone bidder now, $26 million; 26 on the telephone, 27 to the lady on the aisle. Selling, 27 million, 500 thousand pounds - sold...

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Shots - Health News
12:58 am
Tue April 9, 2013

The 'Hard To Change' Legacy Of Medicare Payments

President Obama's budget plan for fiscal year 2014 may include a proposal for Medicare patients to pay more of their own medical bills.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

The budget President Obama will send to Congress Wednesday is expected to include some $400 billion in reductions to Medicare and other health programs.

And if the word around Washington is correct, it may also include a proposal aimed at winning some bipartisan backing — by changing the way Medicare patients pay for their care.

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Animals
12:58 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Starving Baby Sea Lions Flood Southern California Shores

More and more starving sea lions are being found stranded on California shores, and animal rehabilitation centers are at their maximum capacity. Experts say there are fewer fish for these mammals to feed on, but they don't know why.
Gloria Hillard NPR

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

In recent months, more than 1,000 starving baby sea lions have been found on Southern California beaches, from Santa Barbara to San Diego. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has just declared the crisis an "unusual mortality event."

On a recent early morning, Peter Wallerstein is on the job on a beach near Marina del Rey, Calif. His white truck is a familiar sight along this coastline. Next to him, a small blond dog named Pumpkin rides shotgun.

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Movies
12:57 am
Tue April 9, 2013

Crowdsourcing Creativity At The Cinema

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone is one of five celebrity directors taking part in a Canon-sponsored experiment called Project Imaginat10n. His short film, the inspiration for which was crowdsourced via the Internet and social media, focuses on familial loss and the process of grieving.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:00 pm

These days, if they can't find a producer to fund their latest film, a lot of artists turn to crowdsourcing sites like Kickstarter to raise money for production.

But here's a new twist: a project headed up by director Ron Howard that is crowdsourcing the inspiration.

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Research News
12:56 am
Tue April 9, 2013

To Find Insider Trading, Follow The Kids' Money

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 7:14 am

In New York and Washington, government regulators are cracking down on insider trading, the illegal practice in which people with internal information about important company events make stock market trades before ordinary investors find out what's happening.

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Author Interviews
12:55 am
Tue April 9, 2013

'Way Of The Knife' Explains CIA Shift From Spying To Killing

ABL Imaging iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 1:07 pm

When the CIA came into being in 1947, its mandate was to keep tabs on events around the world. Gather intelligence about foreign governments. Spy. But the agency has evolved away from this original mission, as Mark Mazzetti reports in a new book, The Way of the Knife: The CIA, a Secret Army, and a War at the Ends of the Earth.

Mazzetti, a national security correspondent for The New York Times, begins with a quote from John le Carre's Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy:

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The Two-Way
5:14 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Pastor Joel Osteen Is The Target Of A Complex Online Hoax

Originally published on Tue April 9, 2013 10:22 am

April Fool's Day was one week ago — but an elaborate hoax targeting Pastor Joel Osteen gained wide attention Monday, after those behind the hoax used Twitter, YouTube, and other social media to spread spurious claims that the pastor had renounced his faith and would close his huge Texas church.

Update at 12:15 p.m. ET, Tuesday: Man Behind Hoax Describes Motives, Public Response

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Reporter's Notebook
4:15 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Iowa Town Braces For New Reality In Factory Closure's Wake

Main Street in Webster City, Iowa, has so far survived the 2011 closure of an Electrolux factory. But retraining funds and unemployment are running out for former workers, leaving businesses worried that a serious downturn is ahead.
Andrea Hsu NPR

What becomes of a city of 8,000 people when its main employer leaves town? What does it look like, and what does it feel like? I set out to answer those questions on a trip to Webster City, Iowa, last month, as part of my report on the Swedish appliance maker Electrolux.

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The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

His Makeover Strategy In Shambles, J.C. Penney CEO Ron Johnson Is Out

A J.C. Penney story in Plano, Texas.
LM Otero AP

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 6:13 pm

After an unsuccessful makeover of the retailer J.C. Penney, Ron Johnson, the company's chief executive, is out.

In a press release, the company said Myron "Mike" Ullman, who was the company's previous CEO, is retaking the reins.

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Monkey See
3:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

A Tip Of The Mouse Ears To Annette Funicello, 1942-2013

The American actress and singer Annette Funicello, photographed here circa 1960, died April 8, more than two decades after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis.
Henry Gris, FPG Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:59 pm

Now it's time to say goodbye to former Mouseketeer Annette Funicello. The singer, dancer and actress died April 8 at the age of 70, having battled multiple sclerosis for more than two decades.

Throughout her career, she was devoted to Walt Disney, who famously discovered her during a Swan Lake dance recital when she was just 12 years old.

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Business
3:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

One Manufacturing Giant Creates Winners And Losers

Electrolux's new plant in Memphis, Tenn., is the Swedish appliance company's most modern and high-tech facility. The factory will open this summer while an Electrolux plant in Quebec, Canada, is being shuttered.
Andrea Hsu NPR

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:59 pm

The United States lost close to 6 million manufacturing jobs between 2000 and 2009. Now, slowly, some of those jobs are coming back. Over the past three years, the U.S. economy has gained a half-million manufacturing jobs.

But even with the manufacturing recovery, there are both winners and losers — and sometimes they're created by the same company.

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Shots - Health News
3:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Would Angry Teens Chill Out If They Saw More Happy Faces?

Researchers say that aggressive people tend to interpret ambiguous faces as reflecting hostility.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:59 pm

All day long we're surrounded by faces. We see them on the subway sitting two by two, pass them on the sidewalk as we make our way to work, then nod to them in the elevator.

But most of those faces don't tell us much about the emotional life of the person behind the face.

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The Salt
3:54 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Reduced Guilt? Chocolate Gets A Healthy, Fruity Makeover

You could cut up to half the fat from chocolate without sacrificing taste by infusing it with fruit juice, scientists say.
iStockphoto

Chocoholics, rejoice!

British scientists have developed a new fruit-juice-infused chocolate that they say has up to 50 percent less fat than the regular stuff. And it's tasty, too.

The scientists, led by University of Warwick's Stefan Bon, created the hybrid chocolate using a blender to generate microscopic droplets of fruit juice fine enough to blend into molten chocolate.

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The Two-Way
3:53 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

A Woman's Prayer Makes Mormon History

Jean A. Stevens conducts the morning session's closing prayer during the 183rd Annual General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Saturday, April 6, 2013, in Salt Lake City.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 4:16 pm

There was no formal acknowledgment of the historic moment Saturday when Jean Stevens stood at a dark wooden podium framed by potted plants and colorful flowers in the cavernous Mormon conference center in Salt Lake City.

"Our beloved father in heaven," she began, as 20,000 faithful and silent Mormons in the building listened, and as millions of others (according to Church officials) watched on television screens around the world.

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It's All Politics
3:25 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Sequester Uncertainty Surrounds Section 8 Housing Program

Members of the American Federation of Government Employees protest mandatory federal budget cuts during a rally March 20 in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 4:16 pm

Last week, several media outlets and advocacy groups began circulating the same sad story: Because of sequestration, 60 low-income families in Dane County, Wis., were soon to be homeless.

But the truth is more complicated.

The story began with a blog post written in February by Dane County Housing Authority Executive Director Rob Dicke.

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Education
2:59 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Cursive Club Tries To Keep Handwriting Alive

New Jersey grandmother Sylvia Hughes last fall founded a club to teach school children cursive handwriting at her grandson's elementary school.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 7:59 pm

Cursive handwriting is disappearing from the list of required courses at U.S. schools, so one New Jersey grandmother is making sure her grandson's schoolmates know how to loop their Ls and curl their Qs.

At first, 45 students signed up for the cursive club that Sylvia Hughes founded last fall at Nellie K. Parker Elementary School. But then the club grew to 60 8- and 9-year olds.

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The Two-Way
2:46 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

U.S. Will Deploy Solid-Sate Laser Weapon On Ship Headed To Persian Gulf

The Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Dewey in San Diego, Calif.
John F. Williams U.S. Navy

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 4:54 pm

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The Two-Way
2:41 pm
Mon April 8, 2013

Climate Change Could Equal Teeth-Rattling Flights

Fly the bumpier skies?
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 8, 2013 4:23 pm

Buckle up — climate change could make this a bumpy flight.

That's according to a newly published study by two British scientists who say increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere will make "clear air turbulence" — which can't be easily spotted by pilots or satellites — more common over the North Atlantic. That means the potential for gut-wrenching flights between the U.S., Europe and points east.

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