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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Fri July 19, 2013

Scientists: Like Proust, Apes Have Autobiographical Memory

An endangered Sumatran orangutan with a baby clings on tree branches in the forest of Bukit Lawang, part of the vast Leuser National Park, in Indonesia's Sumatra island.
Romeo Gacad AFP/Getty Images

In Remembrance of Things Past, Marcel Proust marvels at how the taste of "plump little cakes called 'petites madeleines'" brought forth memories of Sunday mornings at Combray when he walked into to his aunt Léonie's bedroom to say good morning.

Proust describes what scientists came to term an autobiographical memory. It's the kind of thing that many thought was uniquely human.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Ex-CIA Agent Detained In Panama Reportedly Returning To U.S.

Egyptian cleric Osama Mustafa Hasan Nasr, photographed in 2007. Better known as Abu Omar, he was allegedly kidnapped by CIA agents in Italy in 2003 and taken to Egypt for interrogation.
Amr Nabil Associated Press

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:55 pm

The Washington Post reports that a former CIA operative detained in Panama at the request of Italian authorities was on a plane headed to the U.S. Friday.

Robert Seldon Lady, the former CIA station chief in Milan, Italy, was arrested Thursday in Panama in connection with an extraordinary rendition in 2003.

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Shots - Health News
11:44 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Tiny Rat Cocktail Parties Shed Light On Why Smokers Drink

If you were a lab rat, you might already be thinking that you want another drink.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 9:30 am

Scientists have spent the last five years serving up rodent-sized alcoholic drinks to hundreds of little black and white rats, after a nice hit of nicotine.

These miniature cocktail parties have provided a clearer view on why nicotine and alcohol are so often used, and abused, together.

"It's pretty well understood by most people that those who smoke are more likely to drink," John Dani, a professor of neuroscience at the Baylor College of Medicine, told Shots. "And these people are ten times more likely to abuse alcohol."

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Asiana Crash Victim Was Alive When Hit By Emergency Vehicle

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 6:47 pm

Ye Meng Yuan, one of two Chinese teenagers who died at the scene of Asiana Flight 214's crash in San Francisco, was alive when she was struck by an emergency vehicle responding to the disaster, San Mateo County (Calif.) coroner Robert Foucrault told reporters Friday.

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Monkey See
11:35 am
Fri July 19, 2013

A Comic-Con Diary, Day One: Faces In The Crowd And A Book In The Middle

Fans crowd the entrance to the San Diego Convention Center on the first day of Comic-Con International 2013 in San Diego.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Monkey See contributor/longtime nerd Glen Weldon is headed to San Diego Comic-Con. He's filing periodic updates from one of the largest media events in the world.

Special note: If you're at SDCC, there will be an unofficial Pop Culture Happy Hour meetup in the Marina Bar at the Marriott Marquis and Marina Friday at 5:30 p.m. Pacific Time. (Don't get excited, It'll just be Glen handing out PCHH pins.)

9:02 a.m. (all times PT): I am sitting in a boat between Goth Wonder Woman and an entertainment lawyer.

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The Salt
11:20 am
Fri July 19, 2013

France Aims To Net New Drinkers With Cola-Flavored Wine

Fancy some soda with your wine?
Courtesy Haussmann Famille

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:56 am

Brace yourselves, Francophiles.

First, we broke the news about fast food overtaking restaurants in France. Then we reported the shocker that more than a third of French restaurants serve frozen meals. If these revelations ruin your impression of France as a bastion of culinary tradition, you may not want to read further.

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Shots - Health News
11:06 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Doctors' Questions About Guns Spark A Constitutional Fight

When does a gun become a personal health issue?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 4:13 am

To pediatricians, guns are a health issue.

Firearms remain a leading cause of death and injury for young people. The doctors say the evidence shows that homes are safer for kids, and adults for that matter, when guns aren't around.

Pediatricians say doctors should ask their patients — or their parents, in the case of very young children — if there is a gun in the house.

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Monkey See
10:39 am
Fri July 19, 2013

In Which We Consider 'Turbo,' But Do Not Quite Write A Review Of It

Turbo, center, is the hero of an unlikely adventure involving six or seven talking mollusks, a similar number of humans willing to gamble large sums of money on them, and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway. And they say Hollywood doesn't have any new ideas.
DreamWorks Animation

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 12:27 pm

When I was passing out assignments for this week's movie reviews, I noticed that none of my critics had raised a hand to bid for Turbo -- you know, the DreamWorks animated comedy about a sheltered suburban garden snail who dreams of racing in the Indy 500, and the scrappy squad of Van Nuys strip-mall snails who, with the help of an ethnically diverse array of down-on-their-luck shopkeepers, help him make that dream come true.

Wait, I think I've just figured out why I ended up with this assignment my own self.

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Arts & Life
10:38 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Two Documentaries Examine Violence, Human And Animal

The new documentary Blackfish looks at the practice of keeping orca whales in captivity.
EPK

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:49 am

Two documentaries, Blackfish and The Act of Killing, are making waves around the world. The first riles you up; the second blows your mind.

"Blackfish" is the Inuits' name for the orca, a creature that they say is worthy of veneration but that you don't want to mess with — the chief example in Gabriela Cowperthwaite's Blackfish being Tilikum, responsible for two, possibly three human deaths.

The movie is Tilikum's story — along with the story of other orcas kept in captivity in theme parks like SeaWorld.

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The Two-Way
10:32 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Birds Teach The Air Force A Better Way To Fly

A pair of C-17 Globemaster IIIs on the ground at Edwards Air Force Base in California, where "vortex surfing" is being tested.
U.S. Air Force

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 12:36 pm

More than a century after the invention of powered flight, birds are still teaching us something about how to fly airplanes, with the Air Force studying the V-shaped formation of airborne geese as a way to save fuel.

The technical term is "vortex surfing" and it's already well-known — NASCAR drivers and Tour de France cyclists use it to "draft" off competitors.

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All Tech Considered
10:30 am
Fri July 19, 2013

The Tech Week That Was: Phone Upgrade Plans And TV's Future

Cord-cutting was among the top tech topics this week.
Pennuja via Flickr

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 11:25 am

So much fascinating tech and culture news, so little time. But we certainly think you should see the journalism that's catching our curiosity each week, so each Friday we'll round up the week that was — the work that appeared in this blog, and from our fellow technology writers and observers at other organizations.

ICYMI

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Barbershop
10:24 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Getting Real On Race After Zimmerman Verdict

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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BackTalk
10:24 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Listeners Hoping For Change To Come

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for "BackTalk." That's where we hear from you. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us. What do you have for us this week, Ammad?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Hi, Michel, we got a lot of e-mails this week about the George Zimmerman verdict. A ton of listener responses, as you can imagine, and a lot of people were really angry this week. Some people were mad at the jury, some people were mad at the media for the way we covered the case.

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Economy
10:24 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Can Bankruptcy Boost Broke Detroit?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later we'll head into the barbershop as we do just about every Friday. We'll hear from the guys on why financial planning advice from McDonald's to its employees fell flat and other news of the week, that's later. But first, we turn to Detroit. The city declared bankruptcy yesterday, making it the largest municipal bankruptcy in this country's history. It all comes after decades of decline from the city's bloom years as the center of the nation's auto industry.

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Religion
10:24 am
Fri July 19, 2013

What Is The 'Word Of God' On Zimmerman Verdict?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Our coverage of the George Zimmerman trial verdict drew many strong reactions. Coming up, we will hear some of them. We'll dig into listener e-mail and comments in BackTalk. But first, it's time for Faith Matters. That's where we talk about matters of faith and spirituality in times of crisis, whether personal or involving the country. Many people in this country turn to faith for comfort or understanding.

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It's All Politics
9:38 am
Fri July 19, 2013

'Worst Governors' List Has Suspicious Deep Red Tinge

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal (left) and Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad, both Republicans, made a watchdog group's list of bad governors that has a very disproportionate GOP skew.
Ronda Churchill AP

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 12:16 pm

Of the 50 state governors in the U.S., 30 are Republicans and 20 are Democrats, a ratio of 3 to 2.

So when Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a nonprofit watchdog group, issued a report this week listing 18 governors it alleged are the "worst in America," it immediately raised eyebrows and partisan ire for the notable party tilt of its examples — only two were Democrats.

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The Picture Show
9:33 am
Fri July 19, 2013

How Do You Photograph A City's Bankruptcy?

Kirk Crippens

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 4:09 pm

Photographer Kirk Crippens says you can't. But that hasn't stopped him from trying. Since 2009, he has been documenting the city of Stockton, Calif., which last year became the largest city in American history to file for bankruptcy — until Detroit filed yesterday. Before bankruptcy, Stockton was the epicenter of the foreclosure crisis. But before that, Crippens says, it "was an all-American city — Boomtown, USA — housing going up everywhere."

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Economy
9:30 am
Fri July 19, 2013

With Home Prices Soaring, Has Success Spoiled San Francisco?

Real estate agent Katie Hayes (right) answers questions about a home for sale during an open house in San Francisco in May. With the median home price now in excess of $1 million, many longtime residents feel squeezed out.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Joe Kelso and John Winter probably waited too long. The couple has been together for a dozen years but only got serious recently about buying a house in San Francisco.

They saved enough to be able to afford anything under $500,000, but houses at such prices are now few and far between.

This spring, the median home price in San Francisco topped $1 million, up by a third from last year.

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Ask Me Another
8:58 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Paul Feig: Le Geek, C'est Chic

Paul Feig, dapper as ever.
David Dettmann

Originally published on Wed December 18, 2013 10:12 am

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Interviews
8:49 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Dean Norris On Playing Good In 'Breaking Bad'

Dean Norris plays DEA agent Hank Schrader in AMC's Breaking Bad. "He's a good cop, he just hasn't put the pieces together yet," Norris says.
Ben Leuner AMC

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 10:38 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Aug. 6, 2012.

With each season of AMC's Breaking Bad, Dean Norris' character, DEA agent Hank Schrader, has evolved from a knuckleheaded jock into a complex, sympathetic and even heroic counterpoint to the show's anti-hero, high-school chemistry teacher turned meth cook Walter White. And to further complicate matters, Schrader and White (played by Bryan Cranston) are brothers-in-law.

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The Two-Way
8:45 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Thirsty? 'Sweat Machine' Turns Perspiration Into Drinking Water

The Sweat Machine was unveiled as part of a UNICEF campaign promoting safe drinking water.
UNICEF

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 9:53 am

Thomas Edison famously said that genius is 1 percent inspiration and 99 percent perspiration — words that could well apply to a new machine promoted by UNICEF that turns human sweat into drinking water.

The Sweat Machine extracts moisture from worn clothes by spinning and heating them, then filters the resulting liquid so that only pure water remains. It was built by Swedish engineer and TV personality Andreas Hammar, and uses a technology developed by Sweden's Royal Institute of Technology and the water purification company HVR.

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Shots - Health News
7:58 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Medicines To Fight White Plague Are Losing Their Punch

Children with tuberculosis sleep outside at Springfield House Open Air School in London in 1932. Like sanatoriums, these schools offered TB sufferers a place to receive the top treatment of the day: fresh air and sunshine.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 10:28 am

You probably don't think about tuberculosis much. Why would you? The number of cases in the U.S. is at an all-time low.

But TB has returned with a vengeance in some parts of world, and there have been some troubling outbreaks here at home, too.

Many of the cases come with a deadly twist. They're resistant to standard drugs and can take years of painstaking treatment to bring under control.

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The Two-Way
7:41 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Top Stories: Russian Opposition Leader Freed; Kerry Flies To West Bank

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 8:00 am

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TED Radio Hour
7:34 am
Fri July 19, 2013

What's It Like To Have A Psychotic Episode?

Elyn Saks, mental health law scholar, speaking at the TEDGlobal conference.
James Duncan Davidson James Duncan Davidson

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 12:26 pm

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Unquiet Mind.

About Elyn Saks' TED Talk

"Is it OK if I totally trash your office?" It's a question Elyn Saks once asked her doctor, and it wasn't a joke. A legal scholar, Saks came forward in 2007 with her own story of schizophrenia, controlled by drugs and therapy but ever-present. In this powerful talk, she asks us to see people with mental illness clearly, honestly and compassionately.

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'It's All Politics': NPR's Weekly News Roundup
7:15 am
Fri July 19, 2013

It's All Politics, July 17, 2013

Joe Burbank AP
  • Listen to the Roundup

In the penultimate edition of the podcast, NPR's Ken Rudin and Ron Elving summarize the political fallout of the Zimmerman verdict and the Senate deal reached on filibusters and also update the latest on the Wyoming and Montana Senate races. They also try to define the word "penultimate."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:59 am
Fri July 19, 2013

China Scraps Some Controls On Lending Interest Rates

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 8:00 am

China's central bank announced that it was removing some controls on the interest rates charged by banks for the loans it issues clients.

Reuters explains that the People's Bank of China said in a statement that it was removing the floor "on lending rates for commercial banks, meaning that banks will now be able to cut rates as much as they see fit to attract borrowers."

Reuters adds:

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The Salt
6:35 am
Fri July 19, 2013

The Ramadan Challenge: Shop And Cook While Hungry And Thirsty

Jehad Outteineh shops at a market near the Damascus gate in the Muslim quarter of Jerusalem's Old City. Around the world, hundreds of millions of Muslims are fasting from sunrise to sunset during Ramadan. Outteineh is shopping for the family's iftar, the meal that breaks the fast.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:31 am

Around the world, hundreds of millions of Muslims are fasting from sunrise to sunset. The Muslim holy month of Ramadan began last week and continues until Aug. 7. That's 30 days of avoiding food and drink all day. But in many families, someone still has to prepare a hearty, and sometimes festive, dinner every night.

"Ramadan is a big change in routine," says Jehad Outteneh, a Palestinian in Jerusalem who shops and cooks for her family of eight.

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The Two-Way
6:13 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Trying To Restart Peace Talks, Kerry Will Fly To West Bank

Secretary of State John Kerry speaks on the phone at Mafraq Air Base before boarding a helicopter to Amman on Thursday.
Mandel Ngan AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 21, 2013 6:45 am

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced a last-minute trip to the West Bank this morning that's intended to jump-start stalled peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians.

The trip comes just hours after the Palestinians said they would not return to the negotiating table unless Israel agreed to begin talks using the borders that existed before 1967, when Israel captured the West Bank, Gaza Strip and east Jerusalem.

The Associated Press reports:

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The Two-Way
5:40 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Book News: J.K. Rowling 'Very Angry' That Law Firm Leaked Her Name

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 12:26 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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World
5:39 am
Fri July 19, 2013

Pitch-Drop Worse Than Watching Paint Dry

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Even if you have been bored watching paint dry or grass grow or water boil, you have nothing on these scientists. An experiment that began in 1944 at Trinity College in Ireland just now has a definitive result - to test whether a thick substance called pitch flowed and dripped. A funnel with the stuff was placed over a jar. Seventy years later students saw a drip forming, set up a camera, and witnessed the drip drop. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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