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Theater
9:40 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Was Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. An Ordinary Guy?

The Mountaintop is an award-winning play about the night Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. died. But some critics don't love playwright Katori Hall's portrayal of the civil rights icon as a regular guy. Hall tells host Michel Martin why she found it important to focus on the man, not the myth.

Arts & Life
9:40 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Listener Muses About Tobacco, Parcheesi, and Espresso Cups

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And we have the latest in our series, Muses and Metaphor. We're celebrating National Poetry Month by hearing your poetic tweets. Poems at 140 characters or less that you send us on Twitter.

Today's poem comes from Chris Johnston of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He writes and tweets under the name Boinkaz. Our series curator Holly Bass says she likes this one because it reminds her of her first trip to Istanbul, Turkey earlier this year. Here's the tweet.

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Books
9:40 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Hotel Magnate Bill Marriott On Life's Lessons

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 1:36 pm

In the 1920s, a man passing through Washington, D.C., noticed something about the city in September: It was sweltering, and there were few places to seek relief. He figured you could make a lot of money selling ice-cold drinks.

That first business venture set J.W. "Bill" Marriott Jr. on a road to riches.

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The Two-Way
8:51 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Tepid Reception To Windows 8 Blamed For Drop In PC Sales

Visitors tried out Windows 8 last month at the 2013 CeBIT technology trade fair in Hanover, Germany.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 2:21 pm

Sales of new PCs plummeted nearly 14 percent globally in the first three months of the year, and much of the blame is being placed on Microsoft's new Windows 8 operating system.

International Data Corp. reported Wednesday that shipments of PCs totaled 76.3 million worldwide in the first quarter of 2013, down 13.9 percent from the same period the previous year.

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All Songs Considered
8:48 am
Thu April 11, 2013

We Get Mail: When Someone You Love Likes Music You Hate, What Do You Do?

If someone you love likes Jack Johnson, but you don't, how do you find common ground?
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:11 pm

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The Two-Way
8:47 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Why Does Anyone Care About Minutes Of Weeks-Old Fed Meetings?

The Federal Reserve's headquarters in Washington, D.C. What goes on inside there is of intense interest to investors.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 10:30 am

There's been a bit of a brouhaha over the Federal Reserve's inadvertent early release Tuesday evening of minutes from its closed-door March 19-20 policy meeting.

As The Associated Press writes, "employees at JPMorgan Chase, Goldman Sachs Group, Wells Fargo and Citigroup were among those to receive [the] market-sensitive information."

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Shots - Health News
8:06 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Why Obama's Budget Could Make Health Waves

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (center), flanked by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Acting Administrator Marilyn Tavenner (left) and Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, speaks during a budget briefing in Washington on Wednesday.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 1:16 pm

OK, the conventional wisdom about the budget President Obama sent to Congress yesterday is that's irrelevant.

It's two months late, after all, and the House and Senate have already approved their own spending blueprints for fiscal 2014.

But here's why it matters when it comes to health.

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Politics
7:53 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Paul Ryan Talks About The President's 2014 Budget

The House of Representative Budget Committee chairman Paul Ryan says he sees hope for a bipartisan budget agreement for the first time since President Obama came to office.

The Two-Way
7:51 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Japanese Car Makers Recall Millions Of Vehicles Over Faulty Airbags

The 2002 Toyota Corolla. At least some of them are subject to recall.
Jeff Kowalsky AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 11:14 am

Some 3.4 million vehicles produced by four Japanese automakers are being voluntarily recalled due to faulty airbag inflators.

The inflators were installed in some of Toyota's top-selling Camry and Corolla models produced since 2000. Certain Honda Civics and Mazdas are also subject to recall, which also reportedly includes the Maxima and Cube, according to Reuters.

The defective passenger-side airbag inflators were produced by Tokyo-based Takata at a Mexican plant, Reuters says.

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Monkey See
7:10 am
Thu April 11, 2013

The Downside Of Flexibility: A Plea For Must-See TV At A Must-Watch Time

In a scene from Friends' eighth season, Joey (Matt LeBlanc) and Rachel (Jennifer Aniston) react to Rachel's pending pregnancy. The birth of the baby was a major plot point of the Emmy-winning season of the series.
Warner Bros. Televison

I remember riding the bus to school in the early 2000s, listening as the older kids argued passionately about was going to happen on that night's episode of Friends. In the background, radio ads on the local Top 40 pop station dramatically intoned that maybe Rachel was finally going to admit she really loved Joey and not Ross, but you wouldn't know unless you tuned in to NBC at 8:00 on the dot.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Jobless Claims Fell Sharply Last Week

Many Americans hope to see more signs like this in coming months. (Photo taken earlier this year in San Rafael, Calif.)
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:52 am

There were 346,000 first-time claims for unemployment benefits, down 42,000 from the week before, the Employment and Training Administration reports.

Meanwhile, the "4-week moving average" of claims was 358,000, up by 3,000 from the previous week's 355,000. That measure smooths out some of the volatility in the numbers.

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The Two-Way
6:29 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Shark! Fisherman Gets Quite A Scare, Catches Scene On Video

Isaac Brumaghim had his video recorder running when a tiger shark came by and grabbed his catch.
YouTube.com/AQAHNTR

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 11:31 am

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The Two-Way
6:11 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Top Stories: Wild U.S. Weather; North Korea's Strategy Of Belligerence?

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:45 am

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The Two-Way
6:03 am
Thu April 11, 2013

'He Saved Hundreds': Army Chaplain Gets Medal Of Honor

In this copy of a photograph on display at Kapaun Mt. Carmel Catholic High School in Wichita, Kan., a wounded soldier is helped by Army chaplain Emil Kapaun (on the soldier's left) during the Korean War. The Kansas native died a prisoner of war in 1951.
Mike Hutmacher MCT/Landov

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 9:15 pm

It took more than 60 years, but an Army chaplain who died as a prisoner during the Korean War will be awarded the Medal of Honor by President Obama on Thursday.

Capt. Emil Kapaun was a Catholic priest serving with the 3rd Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division who died at age 35 in 1951. And he's not only a war hero — the Catholic Church is also looking into whether he should be made a saint.

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Around the Nation
5:58 am
Thu April 11, 2013

$100,000 Worth Of Burger Patties Stolen In New Jersey

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. There's a Hamburglar on the loose in the Garden State. Apparently, he's driving a big rig. Police say someone made off with $100,000 worth of burger patties. They were being stored in a New Jersey shipping yard. Surveillance footage shows a 40-foot refrigerated container holding 3,000 burgers being towed away by a tractor trailer Monday night. No word if the driver was wearing a mask, cape, or striped shirt.

The Two-Way
5:37 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Wild Weather Warning: Tornadoes, Heavy Snows, High Winds

Where is spring? Icy branches partially blocked a city street Wednesday in Sioux Falls, S.D. More wintry weather is expected there Thursday.
Dirk Lammers ASSOCIATED PRESS
  • From St. Louis Public Radio: Tim Lloyd reports on the severe weather

While a "Minnesota winter that won't end is expected to dump up to a foot of snow in the Twin Cities by Thursday night," people in Missouri and Arkansas are "grappling with the aftermath of a series of storms that spawned at least two tornadoes."

And the wild weather is spreading to other parts of the nation:

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Food
5:24 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Rep.Walz Wins Congressional Casserole Challenge

Originally published on Fri April 12, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

Say what you will about the slow pace of Congress. Lawmakers were really cooking yesterday. Yes, the Minnesota delegation held its Third Annual Hotdish Competition. Nine lawmakers entered but only one could take the official golden casserole dish trophy home. Representative Tim Walz won handily with an artery-clogging recipe, a casserole made of Kraft cheese, tater tots and bratwurst, all seasoned with a bottle of beer.

The Two-Way
5:15 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Book News: NYC To Pay Occupy Wall Street For Destroyed Books

Books from the Occupy Wall Street library damaged in the November 15 eviction of Zuccotti Park and recovered from a New York city sanitation depot.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:06 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Will North Korea Claim Victory And Stand Down?

On Wednesday, a North Korean soldier looked on from the banks of the Yalu River on the border with China.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 6:21 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Frank Langfitt and David Greene discuss the latest news from the Korean peninsula

As the world waits for what's expected to be another ballistic missile test by North Korea sometime in the next few days, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports there's reason to think that tensions on the Korean Peninsula might soon ease.

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Book Reviews
4:53 am
Thu April 11, 2013

A Poet Grapples With Faith And Death In The 'Abyss'

Image of a human figure before a bright light
iStockphoto.com

Christian Wiman has "a cancer that is as rare as it is unpredictable." A poet and the former editor of Poetry, Wiman has found himself, when overwhelmed by the painful disease and pain-inducing treatments, praying not to God or for language to express his condition, but to the pain itself: "That it ease up ever so little, that it let me breathe. That it not — but I know it will — get worse."

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
4:52 am
Thu April 11, 2013

May Kids' Book Club Pick: 'Lunch Lady And The Cyborg Substitute'

Jarrett J. Krosoczka Studio JJK

She yanks on her elbow-length rubber gloves and snaps the string of her apron into a knot — but this is no ordinary lunch lady. Not only does she serve food, she also serves justice.

The Lunch Lady in question is the star of NPR's Backseat Book Club's latest pick, The Lunch Lady and the Cyborg Substitute by Jarrett Krosoczka.

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Latin America
3:15 am
Thu April 11, 2013

How Hugo Chavez's Policies Affected Ordinary Venezuelans

Maria Colmenares lives in a concrete-block house on a mountainside overlooking the presidential palace in the Venezuelan capital, Caracas. Her story says much about the oil-rich and turbulent Latin American nation.
Nishant Dahiya NPR

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 11:46 am

In the days before elevators, there was no such thing as a penthouse on the top floor. The highest floors of a building had cheaper rents because the stairs were hard to climb.

Caracas, Venezuela, is organized roughly the same way, with many poor neighborhoods climbing up the sides of a mountain valley. Some of the poorest homes are among the most remote, accessible not by any road but by alleyways and long flights of stairs.

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Asia
3:15 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Amid Korean Tensions, Kerry To visit Seoul

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's get an update now on those tensions on the Korean peninsula. South Korea's foreign minister has warned that North Korea could launch a medium-range missile at, quote, "any time." Also, U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says the North Koreans are skating close to a dangerous line. Both the United States and South Korea have put their forces in South Korea on heightened alert, and U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is due in Seoul tomorrow to assess the situation.

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Around the Nation
3:15 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Stroke Patient To Meet Bob Seger

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Tonight, in Flint, Michigan, a limousine is going to pull up to a nursing home and take a 79-year-old patient for a long-awaited night out on the town. Seven years ago, Evie Branan suffered a stroke that left her in a semi-coma. In May of 2011, she tumbled out of her bed, bumped her head and woke up, and her very first words were a request.

EVIE BRANAN: I said I wanted to go to a Bob Seger concert.

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Sports
3:15 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Tiger Woods Favored To Win Masters

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, the first round of golf's first major tournament of the year tees off today. And if people are not excited enough about the Masters, there is added drama this year. The most recognizable golfer on the planet, Tiger Woods, is a bonafide favorite to win his fifth green jacket. NPR's Tom Goldman has been wandering, strolling the grounds of golf's most storied course. He joins us now from Augusta, Georgia. And, Tom, how did you get this assignment?

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Hard duty, David.

GREENE: Really.

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Politics
3:14 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Sen. Rand Paul Tries To Repair GOP's Image With Minorities

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In recent elections the Republican Party has struggled to find much support among African-American voters. That though did not dissuade Kentucky's Republican Senator Rand Paul from making a pitch yesterday at Howard University, the historically black college in the nation's capital.

NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson was listening.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Rand Paul spoke carefully from a teleprompter and posed this question to his audience of young African-American students.

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Politics
3:14 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Senate Readies To Debate Gun Control Measure

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On Capitol Hill, the Senate is set to open debate this morning on the first major gun control legislation to reach Congress in two decades. Some Republicans, though, say they have a pretty good reason to hold up that debate. NPR's Ailsa Chang explains.

AILSA CHANG, BYLINE: Senator Mike Lee of Utah is one of the Republicans who say they're filibustering, and here's his rational: He's not actually trying to block debate. He's just trying to buy more time to consider the proposals.

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Politics
3:14 am
Thu April 11, 2013

Thousands Rally In Support Of Immigration Overhaul

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep reporting this week from Caracas, Venezuela.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene in Washington.

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Politics
3:14 am
Thu April 11, 2013

'Chained CPI' Worked Into Obama's 2014 Budget

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep reporting this week from Caracas, Venezuela.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Law
3:14 am
Thu April 11, 2013

D.C. Circuit Court Operates With Four Vacancies

Originally published on Thu April 11, 2013 8:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The federal appeals court in Washington, D.C. is second only to the United States Supreme Court in terms of the important cases it decides. But the court, known as the D.C. Circuit, has been limping along with four vacancies. President Obama's first nominee recently withdrew after two Senate filibusters blocked her path. The White House is hoping its other nominee will have an easier ride.

Here's NPR's Carrie Johnson.

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