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Interviews
9:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Emmylou Harris And Rodney Crowell: Harmonizing To That 'Old Yellow Moon'

Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell have been friends and collaborators since the 1970s. Their new album together is called Old Yellow Moon.
David McClister Nonesuch Records

This interview was originally broadcast on March 28, 2013.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Thu July 4, 2013

As Southwest Finally Cools, Southeast Gets Drenched

That's a lot of hail: the scene in Santa Rosa, N.M., after the storm blew through Wednesday.
Santa Rosa, N.M., Fire Department

The good news from the National Weather Service:

"The Western U.S. will begin to cool on Wednesday after several days of record-high temperatures. Temperatures will still be hot in many locations, but will be closer to normal for this time of year."

The not-so-good news if you're in the Southeast and have outdoor plans on Independence Day:

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Around the Nation
8:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Stars, Spangles And Lots Of Security At Boston's July 4 Events

Mary Ann Rollings (from left), Gloria Kelley and Linda Lee Stacy were bursting in red, white and blue as they turned out to hear their beloved Boston Pops.
Courtesy of Sammy Stalcup

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 11:43 am

The Fourth of July show will go on as usual tonight in Boston. For the 40th year in a row, the Boston Pops will perform along the banks of the Charles River as fireworks burst overhead.

But the scene and the mood will be different, with heavy security measures in the wake of the recent Boston Marathon bombings. It's in the back of many people's minds that the July 4 celebration was apparently the original target until, police say, the bombers decided to attack the race instead.

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Around the Nation
7:48 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Park Service Cleans Up Eggs In Death Valley

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Around the Nation
7:48 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Strike In Oakland Causes Parking Meter Confusion

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. You ever sense a smile on the face of people who write your parking tickets, as if they enjoy calling you out for letting your meter expire? When Oakland, California cities employees went on a one day strike, residence thought that meant no parking enforcement. But one parking officer decided to cross the picket line and write tickets. He said he was happy with his pay and didn't want to go on strike. Employee of the Month, no, the city said all of the tickets he wrote would be voided.

Parallels
7:45 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Where The Mask Seen In Global Protests Is Made

A woman cleans Guy Fawkes masks, used by many demonstrators in protests around the world and in the recent wave of demonstrations in Brazil, at a factory assembly line in Sao Goncalo, near Rio de Janeiro, June 28.
Ricardo Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 8:42 am

Remember the mask from protests here ...

... here ...

... and here?

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Top Stories: Crisis In Egypt; Assad's Confidence

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:30 am

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Here She Is: Statue Of Liberty Reopens On Independence Day

She's open for visitors again.
Reena Rose Sibayan The Jersey Journal/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 8:37 am

It's an even more notable July 4th this year on Liberty Island in New York Harbor, where the Statue of Liberty is open for the first time since Superstorm Sandy pummeled the Mid-Atlantic region last fall.

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The Two-Way
6:59 am
Thu July 4, 2013

VIDEO: Toledo Driver Rescued After Huge Sinkhole Swallows Car

After a day's worth of heavy news from Egypt, let's take a quick break with something completely different.

Wednesday in Toledo, a sinkhole opened up under driver Pamela Knox's Chevy Malibu, and the aftermath of the vehicle's drop beneath the ground produced some impressive videos.

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The Two-Way
6:00 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Egypt Begins Dangerous New Phase As Interim Leader Steps In

People dance and cheer in Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 4, the day after former Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi was ousted from power.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 9:09 pm

  • From 'Morning Edition': Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson in Cairo
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A Blog Supreme
5:44 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Patriotism And Protest: Jazz For July 4

Louis Armstrong spoke out against the federal government regarding racial issues, but happily played the National Anthem at Newport in 1960.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:41 am

Jazz music has become a point of pride for the United States of America: a homegrown art form forged from folk traditions. But jazz recordings of American patriotic songs aren't abundant. Perhaps because many of jazz's foremost creators were black Americans who lived in a society which actively discriminated against them, many didn't think to tackle that material.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

A Tale Of The Estranged And The Just Plain Strange In 'New School'

Dash Shaw is a graphic novelist and animator whose previous books, including Bottomless Belly Button and Bodyworld, seethe with dark, mischievous intent. He sets out to unsettle, using the unique tools the comics medium provides to expose discomfiting truths about relationships both familial and romantic. A proud experimentalist, Shaw often shuns tidy narrative conventions in favor of raw emotion.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

City, Comedy And Calamity In Cathleen Schine's New Novel

Apartment building in Greenwich Village
iStockphoto.com

Cathleen Schine can always be counted on for an enticing, smart read, and her latest novel, Fin & Lady, is no exception, but it's an odd duck, as quirky as its peculiarly named titular half-siblings. Neither as sparklingly funny as her most recent book, The Three Weissmanns of Westport, nor as brainy as her earlier Rameau's Niece, Fin & Lady is light, entertaining, and ultimately moving, but you can't help wondering what Schine hoped to achieve with it.

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Middle East
3:15 am
Thu July 4, 2013

President Morsi Supporters Furious, Other Egyptians Jubilant He's Out

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Egypt is about to get a new ruler. A caretaker head of state is being ushered into power Thursday following Wednesday's dramatic military coup. President Mohammed Morsi was forced from power just a year after winning the country's first free election. He lost the public's trust amid a failing economy and fears that he was imposing an Islamist agenda.

Politics
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Obama Urges Egypt To Quickly Elect Next Civilian Government

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

On this Fourth of July, we've been following developments in Egypt, where the military has deposed the elected President Mohamed Morsi. President Obama says the U.S. is watching with, as he put it, deep concern. And he urged the generals to transition to an elected civilian government as quickly as possible.

NPR's White House correspondent Scott Horsley joins us now to talk about what role, if any, America plays in this situation. Good morning.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good morning, Renee

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Business
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

SoftBank Moves Closer To 78 Percent Stake In Sprint

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Federal Communications Commission has apparently approved a deal giving the Japanese telecom giant SoftBank a controlling stake in SprintNextel, which is the third-largest wireless operator in the U.S. Experts say SoftBank's industry clout should help Sprint become a more robust competitor. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

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Movies
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Movie Studios Hope We Celebrate July 4 At Theaters

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

The long holiday weekend follows on the heels of a record-setting May and June at the box office. This month begins with the return of the lucrative family-friendly franchise: Despicable Me 2.

Business
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Some people feel awkward about eating alone in restaurants but a new eatery in Amsterdam has only small tables with single chairs. It requires customers come solo. The restaurant is part culinary endeavor, part social experiment. As its creator says, she wanted to give people "food for thought."

Business
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Unlike Facebook and Google, Twitter will allow its users to opt out if they are concerned about privacy. The company is projecting ad revenues of $500 million this year, and double that in 2014.

Middle East
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Ouster Of Egypt's President Reverberates Trough Middle East

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

We are following the events unfolding in Egypt this morning following yesterday's military coup that removed the Islamist President Mohammed Morsi from power. With Egypt holding a leading role in Middle Eastern affairs, we wanted to get a sense of how this leadership change might reverberate through the region.

And to do that, we're joined by Shadi Hamid. He's with the Brookings Doha Center. And Shadi, welcome back to the program. Thanks for coming on.

SHADI HAMID: Hi. Thanks for having me.

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Middle East
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Interim President To Guide Egypt After Morsi Is Overthrown

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And on this Independence Day, I'm Renee Montagne.

Egypt has a new president, a longtime judge who took the oath of office this morning. That official change in power came after several days of protests saw millions of Egyptians pour into the streets, demanding Mohamed Morsi step down. His refusal led to his ouster yesterday by Egypt's military. It was a stunning turnaround for the country's first democratically elected president.

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Middle East
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Egyptian Military Coup Angers Muslim Brotherhood

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Egypt is divided after Wednesday's military coup forced out President Mohamed Morsi. Cairo-based journalist Ashraf Khalil, an Egyptian-American and a contributor to Time magazine, tells Renee Montagne that the Muslim Brotherhood party has threatened violence and that the threat is very real.

Around the Nation
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

The Declaration: What Does Independence Mean To You?

Kara, Michael, Mikaila and Cameron Milton of Greensboro, N.C., pose for a portrait near the Lincoln Memorial on June 21, after reading the Declaration of Independence for Morning Edition.
Erica Yoon NPR

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

We often celebrate Independence Day with backyard barbecues and fireworks, forgetting the document that started this whole country: the Declaration of Independence.

For the past 20 years Morning Edition has asked NPR hosts and reporters to read the document on the Fourth, as a reminder of our country's history. This year, we decided to ask visitors at the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to give it a try.

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Around the Nation
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

After Marathon Bomings, Boston Police Watch July 4 Concert

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 4:59 am

This is the 40th year the Boston Pops will perform along the Charles River with fireworks bursting overhead. But the scene will be different this year following the Boston Marathon bombing in April. Police say there is no specific threat to the celebration but security must be tightened.

Law
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Zimmerman Trial Takes July 4 Off, Case Resumes Friday

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's get an update now on the Trayvon Martin murder case being held in Sanford, Florida. The state is expected soon to wrap up its case against George Zimmerman. He's the neighborhood watch volunteer who shot and killed the unarmed teenager. In a week and a half of testimony, prosecutors have painted a picture of Zimmerman as a wannabe cop, someone who profiled Trayvon Martin and then, after he shot Martin, tailored his story to fit Florida's self-defense law.

NPR's Greg Allen reports.

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Race
3:03 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Mexican Roots Bind Families Who Settled Early In Texas

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 3:19 pm

Unlike many places in America where Latinos are a relatively new minority group, Texas Hispanics were there before white Anglos. In some ways, having once been part of Mexico has lessened the tensions between whites and Latinos. But that's not always the case.

(For an extended version of this story, along with a gallery of images, visit KERA's website: Latino Roots Run Deeper In Texas.)

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Remembrances
2:01 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Douglas Engelbart Dies At 88, Invented Computer Mouse

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And a remembrance, now. The, a computer visionary best known for inventing the mouse has died. As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, the mouse was just one small piece of what Douglas Engelbart contributed to the development of personal computers.

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Author Interviews
1:09 am
Thu July 4, 2013

For 'Star-Spangled Banner,' A Long Road From Song To Anthem

American lawyer Francis Scott Key witnessed the bombardment of Fort McHenry from a boat about 8 miles away.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

All over the country on Thursday, fireworks will light up the sky. In many places, those fireworks will come with a patriotic soundtrack — one that wouldn't be complete without "The Star-Spangled Banner." The song officially became America's national anthem in 1931, but it's been around since the early 19th century.

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Those Who Serve
1:08 am
Thu July 4, 2013

From Front-Line Soldier To Trainer, An Afghan Odyssey

ANA soldiers plot coordinates on a map with the help of their American trainers.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 1:55 pm

This report is part of "Those Who Serve," an occasional series that looks at those who wear the military uniform during a time of war.

It's early afternoon at a small outpost in eastern Afghanistan, and U.S. Army Sgt. Chris Cunningham, with the 10th Mountain Division, heads into a long, dusty tent to teach Afghan soldiers the basics of map reading.

After the sun sets, American soldiers help Afghan soldiers outside the wire. They pop artillery shells containing what's called an illumination round.

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It's All Politics
1:07 am
Thu July 4, 2013

Immigration Debate In Congress Riles Up Texas Republicans

Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas delivers remarks during a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting to work on the immigration legislation in May.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 7:48 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic shifts that could shake up Texas politics in the coming years — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Within a decade, Hispanics are bound to become the largest ethnic group in Texas. These often Democratic-leaning Texans could reshape the state's GOP-dominated political landscape.

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