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Africa
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Egyptian Military Says It Has Overthrown President Morsi

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

(SOUNDBITE OF CROWD CHANTING)

SIEGEL: In Egypt, the military, backed by millions of protestors, has ousted President Mohammed Morsi. Celebratory fireworks and laser lights are lighting up the crowd in Tahrir Square. Elsewhere in Cairo, crowds are gathered to demonstrate on behalf of Morsi and, they say, mourn the death of democracy.

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Around the Nation
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Federal Budget Cuts Hamper Summer Firefighting Efforts

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:13 pm

The wildfire season is expected to intensify and firefighters are facing it with decreasing resources. Federal budget cuts, including the sequester, mean fewer firefighters, less equipment and less spending on prevention.

National Security
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

'Transit Zones' Can Extend Beyond Airports

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Ever since Edward Snowden, a former NSA contractor who has been leaking secret documents, arrived at Moscow's airport over a week ago, his efforts to find asylum from U.S. prosecution have been thwarted. Some countries have turned him down, while others have said they can't consider his request unless he's physically on their soil or at their borders. Snowden's been out of sight in the airport's transit zone, but he's believed to still be there in a legal limbo that's officially not Russian territory.

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Health Care
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Delay In Obacamare Implementation Cheered By Employers

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The Obama administration's decision to delay implementation of a key part of the Affordable Care Act is winning praise from business groups today. The administration has announced it will wait another year before penalizing large employers who fail to offer health care coverage to their workers. The delay gives retail and restaurant companies that had opposed the mandate more time to prepare for the law.

NPR's Jim Zarroli reports.

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History
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Leaders Draw Different Messages From Battle Of Gettysburg

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Our leaders have been commemorating Gettysburg ever since 1863 - most famously President Lincoln that November when he dedicated the cemetery there. Later, presidents and vice presidents have observed many anniversaries at Gettysburg. For the centennial in 1963, Lyndon Johnson, still the vice president, linked the Civil War to the civil rights movement.

PRESIDENT LYNDON B. JOHNSON: One hundred years ago, a slave was freed. One hundred years later, the negro remains in bondage to the color of his skin.

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Around the Nation
2:47 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Arizona Firefighter Remembered For Loving His Job

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

In Arizona, friends and family of the 19 firefighters killed in the Yarnell Hill Fire are sharing their memories.

Food
2:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Just As American As Chorizo

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we continue our discussion on the history and traditions of Independence Day. Sure, there are parades and John Philip Sousa marches, but for many Americans, the grilled hot dogs and hamburgers are as important as the fireworks. Historian Kenneth C. Davis told us earlier that Fourth of July celebrations began in 1776, but the foods we now consider traditional didn't arrive until much later.

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History
2:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

How Slavery Almost Made It Into The Declaration

More than any other day of the year, the Fourth of July is a time to take pride in American history. Guest host Celeste Headlee speaks to author Kenneth C. Davis about what you shouldn't forget this Independence Day.

U.S.
2:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

As Americans, We Stand ... Divided?

The American Values Survey finds that citizens of the U.S. think they're more divided today than they were a decade ago. Guest host Celeste Headlee talks with Don Baer about whether we're really as different as we believe we are.

History
2:45 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Celebrating The Expansion Of Our Nation

On July 4, 1803, President Thomas Jefferson announced the signing of the Louisiana Purchase, when the United States bought more than 800,000 square miles of land from the French. On this anniversary, guest host Celeste Headlee highlights some of the forgotten history around the purchase.

The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Inventor Of Computer Mouse Dies; Doug Engelbart Was 88

This early version of the mouse (named for its tail-like cord) was assembled by Douglas Engelbart and his Stanford team in 1963.
Getty Images/Life

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:20 pm

U.S. inventor Doug Engelbart, the man known as the father of the computer mouse and a thinker who helped introduce other key innovations, died Wednesday morning at age 88. His death was announced today by the Computer History Museum.

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Shots - Health News
2:27 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

A Surge In Painkiller Overdoses Among Women

Drugs found in the medicine chest are claiming more women's lives than cocaine and heroin.
Mark Gabrenya iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:52 am

Women are dying from overdoses of prescription painkillers at a much higher rate than men, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And while men still suffer more overdoses, women are catching up fast.

From 1999 to 2010, the CDC found a fivefold increase in the number and rate of such cases among middle-aged women. Over the same period, the rate of overdoses from prescription painkillers increased 3.5 times in men.

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The Record
1:50 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

When Pop Stars Flirt With Bad Taste

YouTube

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 8:30 am

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NPR Story
1:48 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

First Watch: Whispertown Shows Stunning 'Parallel' Worlds

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 5:37 pm

Merriam-Webster defines parallel as, "extending in the same direction, everywhere equidistant, and not meeting." The luscious and expansive song, "Parallel," from Morgan Nagler's indie project Whispertown and the accompanying music video both explore the term in magnificent ways. The video, made from creative commons videos on YouTube edited together by Morgan Nagler's brother (he wishes to go by "Morgan's Brother") illustrates the concept of parallel by showing a myriad of different scenarios that mimic each other. It's a bit of magic, really.

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Parallels
1:43 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The Hopeful Arab Spring Turns Into A Roiling Arab Summer

Protesters opposing Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi wave flags in Tahrir Square in Cairo on Wednesday. Shortly afterward, the military staged a coup, ousting Morsi and suspending the constitution.
Mohamed Abd El Ghany Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu July 4, 2013 2:42 pm

Two years ago, the Arab Spring was a fountain of hope. Autocratic leaders whose rule was measured in decades were suddenly ousted, raising the possibility of political, economic and social change in a region that was lagging.

But with a coup in Egypt on Wednesday and Syria's civil war raging, the widespread optimism in the spring of 2011 has turned into fears of chaos during the summer of 2013.

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Deceptive Cadence
1:31 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

The Innovative Mosaic Of American Symphonies

Conductor JoAnn Falletta.
Cheryl Gorski courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:34 am

  • Hear JoAnn Falletta's Discussion With Robert Siegel

Our country's culture is a vast conglomeration of more than 200 years of influences from all over the world. We have taken what began as an extraordinary European tradition and expanded that legacy on American soil. We have added our essential egalitarianism, our love of experimentation, our inclusiveness and our boldness to the very form of the symphony. Americans have not been bound by one definition of the symphony, and composers have applied that formal name to pieces of varying length, structure and content.

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Shots - Health News
12:44 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Delay For Insurance Mandate Pleases Businesses

President Obama talked up the Affordable Care Act in San Jose, Calif., in June. Now, the administration has said a key provision affecting businesses won't take effect until 2015.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:07 pm

The Obama administration's decision late Tuesday to postpone the requirement for employers with 50 or more workers to offer health coverage or risk fines has satisfied some key members of the coalition that supported the law.

But the one-year reprieve also raises new questions about the administration's ability to get the huge health law up and running in an orderly fashion. The deadline for the new health exchanges to begin enrolling individuals is Oct. 1.

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The Salt
12:18 pm
Wed July 3, 2013

Outbreak Traced To Pomegranates Reveals Flaws In Global Food Chain

A fruit thought by some to be what Eve used to tempt Adam has been grown in the Middle East for centuries.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 2:10 pm

Disease detectives have traced the continuing outbreak of hepatitis A that has so far sickened 136 people in the U.S. to a shipment of pomegranate seeds from the Anatolian region of Turkey.

As a result, the Food and Drug Administration has ordered any new shipments from the company that shipped the suspect fruit, Goknur Foodstuffs Import Export Trading, to be seized at American ports.

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Television
11:48 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Elisabeth Moss: From Naif To Player On TV's 'Mad Men'

Elisabeth Moss says she's ambivalent about the end of Mad Men, which began in 2007.
Christopher Polk Getty Images

When Mad Men premiered in July 2007, the character of Peggy Olson was introduced to audiences as Don Draper's naive young secretary. In the seasons that have followed, Peggy has slowly become a talented copywriter and Don's protege, meanwhile trying constantly to create a place for herself in the male-dominated world of advertising. Her development has been a centerpiece of the series.

Elisabeth Moss, who plays Peggy, says she has learned about the character and her growth episode by episode, script by script, just like those of us who watch the show on television.

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Movie Reviews
11:42 am
Wed July 3, 2013

'The Lone Ranger': Summer Fun With Manifest Destiny

Armie Hammer stars as the Lone Ranger in a new Disney adaptation.
Film Frame Disney

We're at the point when Johnny Depp's dumbest whims can lead to movies costing $200 million. I imagine Depp lying in a hammock on his private island and saying, "I've always wanted to play Barnabas Collins in Dark Shadows!" and it's done. Then he says, "I've always wanted to do The Lone Ranger — but as Tonto!" and it, too, gets the green light.

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The Salt
10:47 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Civil War Soldiers Needed Bravery To Face The Foe, And The Food

How did the food taste? These faces say it all. Photograph from the main eastern theater of war, Meade in Virginia, August-November 1863.
Timothy H. O'Sullivan Library of Congress

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 11:11 am

War is hell, Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman is famously said to have uttered.* And the food, he might as well have added, was pretty lousy, too.

As the nation marks the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg — a turning point in the Civil War — it's worth remembering that the men who fought on that Pennsylvania field did so while surviving on food that would make most of us surrender in dismay.

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The Two-Way
10:19 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Ecuador Says Its London Embassy Was Bugged

A covert microphone was found in the office of the Ecuadorean ambassador in London, Minister of Foreign Affairs Ricardo Patiño announced during a news conference in Quito.
AFP/Getty Images

Ecuador's foreign minister says a microphone has been found hidden inside the country's embassy in London, where WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange has been living for the past year. The listening device was found last month, says Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño, when he traveled to the embassy to meet with Assange.

The covert microphone was reportedly discovered in the office of the ambassador, Ana Alban.

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Music
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Booker T: My Music Should Be The Soundtrack To Your Life

Originally published on Fri July 5, 2013 7:01 am

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

I'm Celeste Headlee and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Michel Martin is away. If you were to paint a picture of today's contemporary music styles, it might be saturated with synthesizers and samplers that make up a, well, a very contemporary sound, very 21st-century. But there are a few musicians out there achieving the sound of today, but with the instruments of yesterday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "FEEL GOOD")

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Digital Life
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Martin Luther King's Memory Inspires Teenage Dream

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now we continue our special series remembering Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have a Dream" speech, which will be 50 years old this summer.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.: I have a dream...

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN 1: As a kindergarten teacher in a Texas public school, my dream is for our country to begin to value our youngest members of society.

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Politics
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

The Politics Of Abortion In Texas

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

And now, this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We're going to go back to law and the politics of abortion, and we want to focus on what's happening in Texas. Early this morning, legislators there revived an effort to restrict access to abortion in that state. The bill would ban most abortions after 20 weeks and it would also place new tough standards on existing clinics.

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Race
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Housing Investigation Exposes Harassment Of LA's Minorities

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Coming up in a few minutes, we'll dive a little deeper into what's going on with the abortion debate in Texas. But first, we want to talk about a development that's affecting recipients of housing assistance in Los Angeles County. The U.S. Department of Justice this week ordered LA County and the cities of Lancaster and Palmdale, California to pay a total of $12.5 million in damages to residents of subsidized housing. That follows a two-year investigation by the department.

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Politics
10:17 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Aftershocks Felt After Affordable Care 'Earthquake'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

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It's All Politics
10:16 am
Wed July 3, 2013

6 Questions For The Man Who Tracks Texas Trends

Lloyd Potter, the state demographer of Texas
Office of the State Demographer

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 11:47 am

All this week, NPR is taking a look at the demographic changes that could reshape the political landscape in Texas over the next decade — and what that could mean for the rest of the country.

Few know Texas' population as well as its official demographer, Lloyd Potter, a professor at the University of Texas, San Antonio. He talked with NPR this week about his research.

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Business
9:57 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Four Years Into Recovery, Are We Well Yet?

Jeff Caldwell checks a vehicle on the assembly line at the Chrysler Jefferson North Assembly plant in Detroit in May. U.S. auto sales rose last month to their fastest pace since 2007.
Paul Sancya AP

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 1:30 pm

The next couple of days will bring fireworks, hot dogs — and a new unemployment report.

At least the first two will be fun.

As for Friday's job-market assessment, the Labor Department report likely will show little or no change in the 7.6 percent unemployment rate. "There is still a general weakness in the labor market," says Daniel North, economist with Euler Hermes, a credit insurance company.

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Law
9:15 am
Wed July 3, 2013

Ex-FISA Court Judge Reflects: After 9/11, 'Bloodcurdling' Briefings

Originally published on Thu July 18, 2013 2:52 pm

Over 25 years as a federal judge, Royce Lamberth has touched some of the biggest and most contentious issues in the country. He led the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court after the Sept. 11 attacks, reviewed petitions from detainees at the Guantanamo prison, and gave a boost to Native Americans suing the federal government.

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