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The Two-Way
10:14 am
Tue July 23, 2013

PHOTO: Japanese Commuters Tilt Train To Free Trapped Woman

When a woman slipped between a train and a station platform just north of Tokyo on Monday, about 40 commuters and railroad employees worked together to tilt the 32-ton subway car enough to one side so that she could be pulled to safety.

The Associated Press writes that the train car's suspension system "allows it to lean to either side, according to the Yomiuri newspaper, Japan's largest daily."

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Economy
10:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Part-Time Work On The Rise, But Is That A Good Thing?

The number of part-time workers has roughly doubled in the last few years. For most of those employees, that means short hours, erratic schedules and low pay. Host Michel Martin talks with NPR's Marilyn Geewax, and fast-food worker Amere Graham, about the high costs of part-time work.

The Two-Way
9:15 am
Tue July 23, 2013

MUST-SEE VIDEO: 'Whales Almost Eat Divers'

Those are two whales coming up from the water, just feet away from two divers off the coast of central California. The image is from a video, which has gone viral, taken on Saturday.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:19 am

Divers Shawn Stamback and Francis Antigua had a much closer encounter than they expected off the coast of central California on Saturday when two humpback whales surfaced just a few feet away from where they were swimming.

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Shots - Health News
8:45 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Unusual Tick-Borne Virus Lurks In Missouri's Woods

A harmful trio (from left): a deer tick, lone star tick and dog tick.
Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 8:11 am

Last year, scientists got the chance to solve a medical mystery — well, at least half of it. This week the final puzzle pieces fell into place, as investigators tracked the newly identified virus to an eight-legged bug.

The mystery actually began with two Missouri farmers who came down with a strange illness in 2009. They had high fevers, diarrhea and nausea. Their platelet counts dropped dramatically, though they didn't experience any abnormal bleeding.

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The Two-Way
8:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

No-Fly Zone In Syria Could Cost $1B A Month, U.S. General Says

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Martin Dempsey.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:54 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': The World Food Program's Muhannad Hadi talks about the crisis in Syria

On the heels of another deadly day in Syria — where about 100,000 people have died in the past two years and several million more have been displaced by battles between government forces and those trying to topple President Bashar Assad's regime — we're getting a look at what the USA's top general thinks about the options available to the U.S. for intervening militarily.

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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Top Stories: U.S. Options On Syria; Britain's New Prince

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:48 am

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All Tech Considered
7:24 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Giving Brightest Kids The 'Cram School' Experience, Online

With Brilliant.org, students around the world can get challenged with high-level concepts and problems.
Eric Cabanis AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 12:54 pm

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The Two-Way
6:34 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Update: Officer Who Released Tsarnaev Photos Put On Desk Duty

Boston bombings suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev emerges from a boat stored in a Watertown, Mass., backyard on April 19. The red dot of a police sharpshooter's laser sight can be seen on his forehead. This is among the images that Massachusetts State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy gave to Boston Magazine.
Mass. State Police Sgt. Sean Murphy Boston Magazine

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 1:43 pm

The Massachusetts State Police sergeant who gave photos of Boston bombings defendant Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to Boston Magazine has been placed on restricted duty, The Associated Press reported just after 1 p.m. ET Tuesday.

The AP adds, "Sgt. Sean Murphy leaked the photos last week, saying he wanted to counter a glamorized image of Tsarnaev on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine." On Tuesday, Murphy was placed on desk duty, where he will have no contact with the public until a further investigation is completed.

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The Two-Way
5:49 am
Tue July 23, 2013

LaGuardia Back Online After Southwest Accident

The Southwest Airlines Boeing 737 that made an emergency landing at New York's La Guardia airport on Monday after its front landing gear collapsed.
Carlo Allegri Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:20 am

Flights due to arrive at New York City's LaGuardia Airport were experiencing delays that averaged 1 hour and 27 minutes as Tuesday dawned, the Federal Aviation Administration says.

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Environment
5:37 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Solar-Powered Cars Hit The Racetrack

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

OK. A race track usually sounds like this...

(SOUNDBITE OF CAR ENGINES REVVING)

GREENE: That is sound from the starting line of the new Formula One race in Austin last fall. This summer, that same track was home to another race - which sounded like this...

(LAUGHTER)

GREENE: Those barely audible vrooms came from solar-powered race cars.

Terrence Henry of member station KUT went to find how far we have come in the race to create solar powered transportation.

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The Two-Way
5:28 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Book News: Story By 'Catch-22' Author Published For The First Time

Author Joseph Heller in his publisher's office in New York City on Oct. 9, 1974.
Jerry Mosey AP

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 8:29 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Parallels
5:09 am
Tue July 23, 2013

An Afghan Minister Fires Back At Impeachment Attempt

Ghulam Mujtaba Patang speaks at a news conference Monday after being dismissed from his post as Afghanistan's interior minister. He will stay in the post until the country's Supreme Court rules on the legality of his dismissal.
Mohammad Ismail Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:13 am

If you think it's tough being a Cabinet secretary in the U.S., having to deal with the demands of a fiercely partisan Congress and testify a few times a year, try being the Afghan interior minister.

"I have been summoned by the lower house 93 times, and 79 times by the upper house," says Ghulam Mujtaba Patang, who for the past 10 months has been in charge of the ministry that oversees the Afghan National Police.

"Based on this calculation, I have had one day in a week to work for the people," he says.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Reclusive, Curmudgeonly Writer Still Nicer Than Salinger In 'Sons'

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:54 am

When someone uses the term "instant classic," I typically want to grab him and ask, "So this is, what, like the new Great Expectations? You sure about that?" But David Gilbert's novel & Sons, seductive and ripe with both comedy and heartbreak, made me reconsider my stance on such a label. & Sons feels deeply familiar, as though it existed for decades and I was just slow to find it. Revolving around a New York writer of J. D.

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Tue July 23, 2013

James? George? What Will 'Baby Cambridge' Be Named?

Outside the London hospital where the newest prince was born, betting parlors have been advertising the odds on names.
Chris Jackson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 10:51 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Philip Reeves reports on the royal birth

Now that he's been born, the next big moments in little Baby Cambridge's life will be when he's seen in public and when the world hears what his name will be.

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Parallels
4:47 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Which Nations Hate The U.S.? Often Those Receiving U.S. Aid

A protester denounces President Obama during a march near Cairo's Tahrir Square on July 7. Bitter rivals in Egypt tend to be united in opposition to the U.S. government, which has been a leading aid donor to the country for decades.
Gianluigi Guercia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 6:28 am

To figure out which countries dislike the U.S., one quick way is to simply look at which ones are getting the largest dollops of U.S. aid.

This wasn't the focus of a recent survey by the Pew Research Center. But it did emerge when Pew spoke to people in 39 countries about the U.S. and China, asking respondents if they had a favorable view of these two countries.

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Asia
4:29 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Japanese Commuters Save A Life During Rush Hour

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. At a station in Japan, a bunch of rush-hour commuters kept the train running on time and saved a life. When a woman stepping off the train fell between the stopped car and platform, about 40 commuters went into action. Along with transit workers, the passengers pushed the 32-ton train far enough away that the woman could be pulled up, pretty much unhurt. And the train? It left only eight minutes late. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Shots - Health News
4:28 am
Tue July 23, 2013

A Scientist Debunks The 'Magic' Of Vitamins And Supplements

Ads often tout dietary supplements and vitamins as "natural" remedies. But studies show megadoses of some vitamins can actually boost the risk of heart disease and cancer, warns Dr. Paul Offit.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 2:21 pm

A pediatrician who spent years defending childhood vaccines against the likes of actress/activist Jenny McCarthy has launched an assault on megavitamins and dietary supplements.

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Pop Culture
3:56 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seventh Try's The Charm For Hemingway Look-Alike

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

I mean, isn't it every white haired, husky, bearded man's ambition to look like Hemingway? Sure seemed that way at the annual Papa Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The annual event was just held at Sloppy Joe's, a favorite Hemingway watering hole on Key West. The winner: software developer Stephen Terry. He beat out more than a hundred hopefuls, including the husband of chef Paula Deen. Those who didn't win, take heart, it was Terry's seventh try. Now that's one earnest effort.

Business
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Ahead Of The Curve: LG Takes Orders For OLED TVs

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And for our last word in business today, the world is not flat and neither are some new TVs.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

That's right. LG is taking preorders in the United States for its new 55-inch TVs. They're not flat, they're curved. Samsung already sells something like this in South Korea.

MONTAGNE: The screens bend away from the viewer. Apparently, what's known as OLED technology allows for super-thin, flexible screens and vibrant colors.

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Business
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

'Arrested Development' Boosts Netflix Earnings

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a streaming success.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NPR Story
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

What's Different About The Latest Push For Middle East Talks

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 6:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to bring Israeli and Palestinian officials to Washington to discuss a possible resumption of peace talks. Kerry announced on Friday that the two sides have tentatively agreed to preliminary talks but when and if actual peace negotiations will occur is uncertain. White House spokesman Jay Carney said yesterday he hopes the parties will be in Washington in the coming weeks.

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Political Reporters Hit The (Bike) Trail In Iowa

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Okay. Political stories often come from the White House and they often take our political correspondents, say, to Iowa. That's where three of them are right now. But not for an election cycle, but actually to cycle. NPR's Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor are all on vacation together, pedaling across the state of Iowa, hundreds of miles with thousands of other cyclists. It's an annual summertime ritual known as RAGBRAI.

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NPR Story
3:23 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Republicans Pin Hopes On Senate Turnover In 2014

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 5:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Washington, D.C. the next election always seems just around the corner, even in the middle of summer when it seems a long way away to everyone else. Republicans are in the Senate minority today, but about now they're feeling confident about their prospects to pick up seats and maybe even regain the majority in 2014. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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Parallels
1:02 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Despite Many Threats, Afghan TV Satire Mocks The Powerful

Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, makes fun of government officials and other powerful figures in Afghanistan. Cast members are shown performing a skit during a taping of the show.
Sultan Faizy NPR

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:10 pm

Saturday Night Live. The Daily Show. Zang-e-Khatar.

OK, maybe you haven't heard of that last one. But the comedy-sketch television show is well known in Afghanistan, where Zang-e-Khatar, or Danger Bell, is one of the most watched programs.

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Race
1:01 am
Tue July 23, 2013

In The Summer, Univision Is Numero Uno

Pitbull and Jennifer Lopez recently performed on Univision's Premios Juventud.
Rodrigo Varela Univision

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 7:32 am

For three consecutive weeks this summer, Spanish-language TV network Univision won the prime-time ratings among young adult viewers. The network is bragging about its prime-time ratings domination with full-page ads in the LA Times, New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Its English-language video exclaims: "For the first time ever, Univision is now the number one network in any language."

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The Salt
1:00 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Why Skipping Breakfast Might Raise Risk Of Heart Disease

Skipping breakfast is risky.
iphoto

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:18 pm

Breakfast has long gotten a good rap for everything from aiding weight loss to improving focus in the classroom.

And ever since the Alameda County study in California back in the 1960s linked breakfast — along with a host of other habits — to a longer lifespan, there's been a societal push towards breaking the fast.

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Politics
12:58 am
Tue July 23, 2013

How Floor Charts Became Stars Of Congress

http://senatecharts.tumblr.com/

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 9:26 am

Watch C-SPAN long enough, and you'll see members of Congress using visual aids: big, brightly colored poster boards, known on Capitol Hill as floor charts.

They've become an essential part of congressional messaging.

Almost every day the House of Representatives is in session, lawmakers line up to give what are known as one-minute speeches. Florida Democrat Frederica Wilson is always there.

And she always has her floor chart with her. It displays the number of days since Wilson came to Congress and the number of Americans unemployed.

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The Salt
12:57 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Texas Pit Masters Bask In Moment Of Barbecue Glory

The Pecan Lodge's combination plate, a meat lover's dream.
Wade Goodwyn NPR

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:18 pm

It's not even noon yet but every table out front of the Pecan Lodge in downtown Dallas is filled with veterans with barbecue heaped on their plates, smirking at the gobsmacked newbies. First timers are easily discernible by the stunned looks on their faces when they walk in and see the line.

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Animals
5:53 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

We Call Him Flipper. But What Do The Dolphins Call Him?

Bottle-nosed dolphins leap out of the water near Dana Point, Calif.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:02 pm

Dolphins are like humans in many ways: They're part of complex social networks and, just as in people, a dolphin's brain is big, relative to the size of its body. But there's something else, too — a study published Monday shows these acrobats of the sea use name-like whistles to identify and communicate with each other.

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It's All Politics
5:23 pm
Mon July 22, 2013

McConnell's Challenge: Deal-Making Without Fingerprints

Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate minority leader, may have previewed his below-the-radar approach to future negotiations with Democrats during the recent filibuster fight.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon July 22, 2013 7:14 pm

It appears that it's just a matter of days before it becomes official that Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, the Senate's top Republican, will be forced into a primary by a Louisville businessman with Tea Party backing.

The news that Matthew Bevin, owner of a bell-manufacturing company and an investment company executive, intends to soon announce his effort to oust McConnell is interesting because it appears to place McConnell in something of a bind.

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