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Space
2:36 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

The Government Shutdown's Final Frontier: How NASA Is Dealing

While almost all of NASA's employees have been furloughed because of the government shutdown, ground control activities for the International Space Station are still operational. Above, astronaut Chris Cassidy on a spacewalk aboard the ISS on May 11.
AP

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:39 am

If ET wants to phone home, this is not the week to do it. NASA's phone lines are down, as are its website and many Twitter feeds. All have been silenced by the government shutdown, whose far-reaching consequences are now stretching into space.

The shutdown began on Tuesday, after Republicans and Democrats in the House of Representatives failed to come to an agreement over the federal budget. Most of the government's nonessential services have ground to a halt, and among the hardest hit agencies is NASA.

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It's All Politics
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Obama's Shift In Rhetoric Helping Democrats Stick Together

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid celebrate the open enrollment of the Affordable Care Act on Tuesday. During the government shutdown, the Democrats have been more unified than they have been in a long time.
Michael Reynolds EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

President Obama has been railing against Republicans in Congress nearly every day this week.

"One faction of one party in one house of Congress in one branch of government shut down major parts of the government," he said in the White House Rose Garden on Tuesday. "All because they didn't like one law."

He's expected to take that message on the road on Thursday, visiting a construction company in Maryland to talk about the impact of the shutdown on the economy.

And that finger-pointing at Republicans is sure to be part of his speech again.

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Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Shutdown Leaves Skeleton Crews At Closed National Parks

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And finally to the national parks. In total, 401 park service sites have been closed due to the government shutdown, ranging from Yellowstone and Yosemite to Civil War battlefields and the Statue of Liberty. And the many memorials along the National Mall here in Washington are barricaded: Lincoln, Jefferson, World War II.

The director of the National Park Service, Jon Jarvis, told me even sites like those that may not seem to require park service supervision do.

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National Security
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Intelligence Chief: Shutdown Makes America More Vulnerable

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A Senate hearing today focused on the shutdown's impact on national security. Intelligence leaders told lawmakers they could not guarantee the safety of the country because most civilian intelligence workers are furloughed. NPR's Larry Abramson has that story.

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Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Shutdown Is The Latest Hit To Federal Worker Wallets, Morale

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

They've been sequestered, furloughed and told to work without pay. Meanwhile, they still have mortgages, bills and kids in college. How is the shutdown affecting hundreds of thousands of federal workers?

Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Want To Raft Through The Grand Canyon? Not During The Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Scott Lee can look down the limestone cliffs and see the Colorado River cutting through the Grand Canyon. But what's maddening is he can't get on the river. Today, Lee was planning to get in a raft and launch a 20-day trip down the Colorado. But his group of 16, including his 13-year-old son, whom he pulled out of school in New Hampshire for this trip of a lifetime, can't get started.

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Politics
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

As Shutdown Drags, Boehner Shifts Focus From Health Law

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Day two of the government shutdown is nearing its finish with no end in sight. President Obama is gathering the four top Congressional leaders to the White House this evening, but it's really just one person he'll need to persuade, House Speaker John Boehner.

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Europe
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Russia Charges Greenpeace Activists With Piracy

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Russian prosecutors have filed charges of piracy against 14 people who were aboard a Greenpeace boat during a protest last month in the Russian Arctic. Under Russian law, piracy is punishable by as much as 15 years in prison. Greenpeace says it was peacefully protesting the dangers of oil drilling in the Arctic and that the Russian government is violating international law.

NPR's Corey Flintoff reports from Moscow.

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Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Hundreds Of Safety Net Hospitals Face Uncertain Future

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

Hospitals that serve the neediest patients are bracing themselves through the roll-out of the Affordable Care Act. These safety-net hospitals treat large numbers of people with no health insurance and many are struggling. In New York, a handful of these hospitals are on the brink of closing.

And as NPR's Joel Rose reports, some worry that the health care law will make things even worse, not better.

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Around the Nation
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Federal Funds For Meals On Wheels Tied Up In Shutdown

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 5:56 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Nutrition programs that feed the elderly have not been exempted from the closure. For example, Meals on Wheels in Ypsilanti, Michigan. It feeds about 200 elderly clients - most of whom live alone - supplying what for many is their only meal of the day.

ALISON FOREMAN: Our meal today is one of our clients' absolute favorites. It's chili with cornbread and stewed vegetables.

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Music News
2:24 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

A Veteran Traces America's Biography In Music, From Coney Island To Vietnam

Ethel performs its Documerica program, featuring photos from Environmental Protection Agency archives, and music by composers including Vietnam veteran Kimo Williams, at the Park Avenue Armory in 2012.
James Ewing Brooklyn Academy of Music

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 3:29 pm

One summer night in 1969, Kimo Williams went to a rock concert in Hawaii, which led to one of the two most important decisions of his life.

"I started out on guitar. I wanted to be Jimi Hendrix," Williams says.

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The Two-Way
2:17 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Clapper: Shutdown Hurts Intelligence, Counterterrorism Efforts

National Intelligence Director James Clapper (left), accompanied by Gen. Keith Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency, testifies on Capitol Hill Wednesday.
Evan Vucci AP

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 6:50 pm

Director of National Intelligence James Clapper told a Senate panel on Wednesday that the government shutdown — which forced the furlough of 70 percent of the CIA and NSA workforce — amounted to a "dreamland" of opportunity for foreign spy agencies.

Clapper, who appeared side by side with National Security Agency chief Gen. Keith Alexander, told a hearing of the Senate Judiciary Committee that failure to fund the government "is not just a Beltway issue. It affects our capability to support the military, diplomacy and our policymakers."

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

U.S. Opposes Tech Firms' Plea To Release Surveillance Requests

An employee stands at the Microsoft booth during the 2013 Computex in Taipei on June 4, 2013.
Mandy Cheng AFP/Getty Images

The United States filed a court brief (pdf) opposing the release of details concerning the surveillance requests they hand big tech companies in the U.S.

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The Two-Way
1:39 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

At Least 8 Dead In Tenn. Church Bus Crash

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 4:05 pm

Eight people are reported dead in a fiery crash between a tractor trailer and a tour bus in Tennessee.

The Knoxville News Sentinel reports that the crash has shut down both sides of Interstate 40, in Statesville, Tenn., east of Knoxville.

Aerial images of the crash show a smoldering trailer and an overturned bus.

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The Salt
12:57 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Is It Time To Cool It On Kale Already?

Are we putting too much pressure on this little superfood that could?
Peet Sneekes Flickr

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 12:23 pm

Let's start by agreeing to this premise: Kale is very good for you.

And yes, we here at The Salt have been known to indulge in — nay, crave — kale chips and kale salads on a not infrequent basis.

Still, when we found out that Wednesday is National Kale Day — featuring a kale dance party (we kid you not) — we couldn't help but think: Come on, people, the kale love has officially Gone. Too. Far.

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Shots - Health News
12:07 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Why Eye Contact Can Fail To Win People Over

Eye contact may prove persuasive only if a person's already on your side, a study finds.
iStockphoto.com

Pop psychology holds that to connect with someone, you should look deep into their eyes. The more you look, the more persuasive you'll be. But that may work only when your audience already agrees with you.

Researchers in Germany tested the power of the eye lock by polling university students about their opinions on controversial issues like assisted suicide, nuclear energy and affirmative action in the workplace.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Dying 'Angola 3' Inmate Freed After Decades In Solitary

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 3:26 pm

Herman Wallace, one of the "Angola 3" inmates who spent more than 40 years in solitary confinement for the killing of a guard, has been freed after his conviction was overturned.

U.S. District Judge Brian Jackson in Baton Rouge, La., said Tuesday that Wallace had not received a fair trial.

The Associated Press says that Jackson "had also ordered a new trial because women were unconstitutionally excluded from the grand jury that indicted Wallace in the guard's death. And, he ordered him immediately released."

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All Songs Considered
11:34 am
Wed October 2, 2013

First Watch: Jacco Gardner, 'The End Of August'

Courtesy of the artist

Somehow this young Dutch musician has managed to capture an aesthetic that happened 20 years before he was born. Jacco Gardner makes music in the spirit of early 1960s baroque pop bands, such as The Left Banke (a group that featured a harpsichord) or late '60s Kinks, and certainly The Zombies from their Odessey and Oracle period. Gardner channels these sounds on a new song and trippy video called "The End Of August."

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Music Reviews
11:28 am
Wed October 2, 2013

On 'Days Are Gone,' Three Sisters HAIM It Up

HAIM.
Tom Beard Courtesy of the artist

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The Two-Way
11:19 am
Wed October 2, 2013

FBI Arrests Alleged Owner Of 'Silk Road' Black Market Site

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 6:47 am

The FBI has moved to crack down on a shadowy back channel of the Internet — where transactions take place outside of easily accessible domains — arresting the alleged proprietor of the black-market site Silk Road, which has been called the eBay of the drug trade.

Ross William Ulbricht, 29, known by his hacker handle "Dread Pirate Roberts," was arrested Tuesday morning in San Francisco and charged with one count each of narcotics trafficking conspiracy, computer hacking conspiracy and money laundering conspiracy, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigations' court filing.

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Sports
10:57 am
Wed October 2, 2013

At 49, Jamie Moyer's Pitching Career Goes Into Extra Innings

Jamie Moyer, shown above pitching for the Colorado Rockies in May 2012, made his major league debut back in 1986. He says that after decades in the major leagues, he'd occasionally have to remind himself that "in baseball terms, I really was old, but in everyday life, I really wasn't."
Andy Lyons Getty Images

We don't often think of professional athletes improving with age, but Jamie Moyer was a better pitcher in his 40s than he was in his 20s. Moyer became the oldest pitcher to win a Major League Baseball game when, in April 2012, at the age of 49 years, 150 days, he pitched the Colorado Rockies to a 5-3 win over the San Diego Padres.

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The Record
10:29 am
Wed October 2, 2013

This Beat's For You: The Making Of Drake's 'Furthest Thing'

Producer Jake One in Seattle in 2011.
Kyle Johnson for NPR

Originally published on Thu October 3, 2013 9:33 am

The journey of a song from farm to table, so to speak, is not something listeners are likely to consider in the course of absorbing an album. And that's for the best. The song is part of a longer narrative. It fits and then is over. In the context of a longplay, its own story is not meant to be lingered on.

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Wed October 2, 2013

One Biker Released; Investigation Of NYC Attack Continues

The moment of the attack on Sunday, after dozens of motorcyclists chased and surrounded an SUV. They then smashed its windows and beat the driver.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:45 am

One of the two men taken into custody has been released as authorities in New York City continue to investigate an incident Sunday in which dozens of motorcyclists chased a driver. Some then surrounded his SUV, smashed its windows and beat the man in front of his wife and young child.

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The Protojournalist
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

The 1,000-Year Calendar: Mark These Dates

In the futuristic books, movies, songs and video games that abound, there is an overabundance of speculation about the distant future.

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Health Care
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Health Care Act Reminds Young Adults They're Not Invincible

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, you've probably heard a lot about the Stand Your Ground law in the death of Trayvon Martin, but you might not have heard about the woman who said she just fired a warning shot at her abusive husband and was sentenced to 20 years in prison. Now her case is getting a second look, and we'll talk about that in just a few minutes.

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Africa
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

A Month In Mamelodi: 'Slum Tourism'?

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 7:34 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Beauty Shop
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

How Important Is Health Care Act To Latinas?

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
10:12 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Old 'Stand Your Ground' Case Gets New Trial

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:45 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. In a few minutes, we will hear from a white South African couple who left their middle-class home in the suburbs for a month to live in one of South Africa's poorest black townships. They'll tell us why they did it and what they learned from it.

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The Two-Way
9:19 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Tom Clancy, Master Of Military Techno-Thrillers, Dies

Author Tom Clancy in 2003.
Ralph Lauer MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 11:45 am

Tom Clancy, the best-selling writer of such "techno-thrillers" as The Hunt for Red October, Red Storm Rising and Patriot Games, has died.

He was 66.

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The Two-Way
8:28 am
Wed October 2, 2013

'Hoax Bomb' Charge Filed Against Man In Florida Airport Scare

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 8:57 am

A 39-year-old man has been accused of making and possessing a "hoax bomb" and making a false report about an explosive device following the scare that shut down Jacksonville (Fla.) International Airport for five hours on Tuesday.

Our colleagues from WJCT report that the man, Zeljko Causevic, "is a Jacksonville resident originally from Serbia."

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