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The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Falling In Love Again: Face-Transplant Donor's Daughter Meets Recipient

Carmen Blandin Tarleton of Thetford, Vermont, right, is embraced by Marinda Righter, daughter of face donor Cheryl Denelli-Righter, at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, Mass., on Wednesday.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

If there's one conversation you listen to today, make it Melissa Block's talk with Carmen Blandin Tarleton and Marinda Righter.

Tarleton, who was disfigured when her estranged husband poured Lye over her body, received a face transplant in February. This week, for the first time, Tarleton met Righter, the daughter of the face donor.

Righter and Tarleton embraced and then Righter asked Tarleton if she could touch her face.

"It was probably one of the best feelings I've had in my life," Tarleton told Melissa.

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The Two-Way
2:04 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

U.S. Revises Entry Procedure For Those On Student Visas

The department of Homeland Security is changing the way border agents process those people entering the country on student visas.

"Effective immediately," the AP reports, agents will have to "verify that every international student who arrives in the U.S. has a valid student visa."

The AP adds:

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NPR News Investigations
2:03 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Justice In The Segregated South: A New Look At An Old Killing

When John Queen died in August 1965 in front of the Ice House (the building between the Standard Oil station and The Dollar Store), rules of racial inferiority were so entrenched in Fayette, Miss., that black residents felt they couldn't complain. But just four months later things changed and black residents marched on Dec. 24 as part of their boycott against white-owned businesses.
Jack Thornell AP

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 4:41 am

This story contains language that some may find offensive.

In the segregated South in 1965, John Queen was about as insignificant as a man could be. He was black, elderly and paralyzed. His legs had been crushed when as a boy he fell off a roof. For the rest of his life, he pulled himself around with his hands.

In Fayette, Miss., he would shine shoes on Main Street for a few coins. People called him "Crippled Johnny" or "Shoe-Shine Johnny."

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Business
1:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

New U.S. Trade Representative Faces Big Challenges Abroad

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Expanding trade abroad is a high priority for President Obama. This week, he nominated a trusted adviser named Michael Froman to become the next U.S. trade representative. Froman is currently deputy national security adviser for international economic affairs. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports on the challenges he would face as trade representative.

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Economy
1:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Stock Market Rallies On Better-Than-Expected Jobs Report

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

The stock market rallied on Friday after a better-than-expected jobs report. The Labor Department said employers added 165,000 jobs to payrolls in April. The unemployment rate ticked down to 7.5 percent.

Economy
1:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Jobs Report Better Than Expected, But Still Not That Great

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block. The unemployment rate edged down a tiny bit today to 7.5 percent. That's the lowest it's been in more than four years. In addition, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported there were 165,000 net new jobs in April. This was better than most economists expected. Even better, the government said it had undercounted in February and March by more than 100,000 jobs.

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Law
1:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

California Reluctant To Further Reduce Its Prison Population

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

To California now, where Governor Jerry Brown promises to keep fighting federal court orders to reduce his state's prison population. While Brown did meet a deadline late last night to file a plan for further inmate cuts, he insists those cuts will jeopardize public safety, and he says he intends to take an appeal back to the Supreme Court. NPR's Richard Gonzales has the story.

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Around the Nation
1:54 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Pre-Exam Party Grows Into Violent 'Drink Fest' In Madison

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Tomorrow, in Madison, Wisconsin, college students will be partying, and it's not your average University of Wisconsin party. It's the annual Mifflin Street block party, a pre-exam bash. And as we hear from Gilman Halsted of Wisconsin Public Radio, the tradition has morphed into a sometimes violent 24-hour drinking fest, and the city and university are not happy about it.

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Movie Reviews
12:55 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

A Modern 'Maisie,' Still Yoked To Absurd Adults

True Blood star Alexander Skarsgard turns in a sensitive performance as a sort of surrogate dad for the poorly parented title character (a restrained Onata Aprile) in What Maisie Knew, a quietly stirring update of the Henry James novel.
JoJo Whilden Millennium Entertainment

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 1:30 pm

By the end of What Maisie Knew, what 6-year-old Maisie knows is the thing everyone in the theater has figured out in the first five minutes: This poor little girl has two of the most horrible movie parents since Faye Dunaway got her hands on a wire hanger.

They fight or are distracted so much that Maisie is often left to her own devices, making herself meals or scrounging for cash to pay for the pizza her parents ordered.

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It's All Politics
12:37 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Democrats Have High Hopes Of Defeating Sanford In S.C.

Democrat Elizabeth Colbert Busch looks over at former Republican Gov. Mark Sanford during a debate Monday in Charleston, S.C., in the 1st Congressional District race.
Randall Hill Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 6:28 pm

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The Record
12:34 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

A Night Of Worship In The Church Of Badu

Erykah Badu answers questions on stage during the Red Bull Music Academy, a series of lectures and performances in New York City.
Tony Blasko Red Bull Content Pool

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 10:08 am

Erykah Badu doesn't think she's old enough to be anybody's godmother, and the first time somebody asked her to fulfill that role (Solange, because of course) she said, how dare you. Badu was onstage at the Brooklyn Museum on Tuesday night, an event that's part of the Red Bull Music Academy, a series of shows and lectures happening this month in New York City.

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The Two-Way
12:28 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

NASA: Warming Climate Likely Means More Floods, Droughts

Flash floods followed heavy rains in northern India in September.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 10:53 am

The Earth's wettest regions are likely to get wetter while the most arid will get drier due to warming of the atmosphere caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide, according to a new NASA analysis of more than a dozen climate models.

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The Two-Way
12:27 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

For Washington School, Good Weather Means School's Canceled

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 12:55 pm

Wish our boss was this generous.

The principal of a small, private school in Washington decided that it was so beautiful outside, kids should take the day off to enjoy it.

Bellingham Christian, which is right across the border from Vancouver, posted the notice on its website.

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The Two-Way
12:05 pm
Fri May 3, 2013

Employment Numbers Tell Us A Lot (But Not That Much)

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 3:17 pm

The nation's unemployment rate hit a four-year low of 7.5 percent and the job market improved last month. Friday's news helped push the Dow Jones industrial average above 15,000 for the first time.

Was that a rational response?

Although the jobs report for April was positive, what triggered the market reaction was the fact that it was better than expected. Instead of 145,000 jobs created, as most economists predicted, the Labor Department says there were 165,000 new jobs.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Witherspoon's Punishment: $100 Fine & A Viral Arrest Video

Actress Reese Witherspoon in a photo provided by the City of Atlanta Department of Corrections after her arrest.
AP

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
11:23 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Phil Woods On Piano Jazz

On this episode of Piano Jazz, originally broadcast in 2003, alto saxophonist Phil Woods brings his quintet's rhythm section — bassist Steve Gilmore and drummer Bill Goodwin — by for a session with host Marian McPartland. Woods has been called "The New Bird," as in the heir to bop alto pioneer Charlie "Bird" Parker.

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Shots - Health News
11:02 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Paleo Diet Echoes Physical Culture Movement Of Yesteryear

In 1899, Macfadden published the first edition of Physical Culture, a magazine devoted to bodybuilding, health and nutrition that ran until 1952. At its peak in the 1910s, it had sales of more than 100,000 issues per month.

Etsy

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 11:18 am

The paleo diet is sometimes ridiculed as a fad that relies on an overly rosy view of our primitive past.

But it turns out that popular health movements that advocate going back to a more natural way of living are nothing new.

Consider this quote: "It is reasonably certain that man was originally made to live and exercise in the open air, bathe in rivers, and expose his body to the healthful action of the sun."

And this one:

"Civilized man is manufacturing and eating many substances that slowly but surely lead to degeneration, disease and premature death."

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Economy
10:58 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Reality Check: Strapped States Cutting Unemployment Benefits

California saw unemployment benefit cuts of 18 percent go into effect this week, reducing checks for more than 400,000 people.
Douglas Dickens iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 11:27 am

The jobs report for April showed some improvement — but not much — in the unemployment rate and the total number of unemployed workers.

It's not great news for people looking for work, and it's also not great for states. After years of persistently high unemployment, states have drained their unemployment trust fund accounts.

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Arts & Life
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Checkmate! Teen Chess Stars Make Their Move

The 2013 U.S. and Women's Chess Championships are under way in St. Louis, Missouri. Host Michel Martin speaks with two of the competition's youngest players. Kayden Troff is the current under-14 World Youth Chess Champion, and at 15, Sarah Chiang is the youngest woman competing in the Women's Chess Championships.

Barbershop
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

By Coming Out, Has Jason Collins Changed The Game?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the Barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds.

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Economy
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

The Changing Face Of The Working Poor

The latest employment figures are out and they show gains in hiring. The Wall Street Journal's Sudeep Reddy joins host Michel Martin to talk about the report, and the millions of working Americans who still fall below the poverty line.

Faith Matters
10:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Humanists On Surviving Crisis Without A Prayer

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we often talk about people with mad skills in tough competitions, so in just a few minutes, we are going to meet two teenagers who are making their mark in chess. That's later.

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Arts & Life
10:21 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Hey Teenagers! We Want To Hear Your Stories

Are you the next Radio Diaries teen diarist?
M Mujdat Uzel iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri May 10, 2013 6:49 pm

Are you a teenager with a story to tell? NPR and Radio Diaries want to hear it. Write it down, photograph it (and record it if you want) and then submit it to the storytelling site Cowbird.

Beginning in 1996, Radio Diaries gave tape recorders to five teenagers to create audio diaries about their lives. Starting on May 6, All Things Considered will revisit these original diarists, now in their 30s, to document their lives for NPR listeners.

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NPR Story
10:14 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Unemployment Rate Down To 7.5 Percent

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with some good economic news.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average hit 15,000 for the first time ever this morning. The S&P 500 also hit a record high. All of this came just after the release of a positive jobs report. The Labor Department says 165,000 jobs were created in April. Economist have been expecting about 150,000 new jobs last month.

The Salt
10:09 am
Fri May 3, 2013

How A Distillery Ages Bourbon In Days, Not Years

A bottle of Cleveland Whiskey's bourbon sits on a shelf with empty bottles at the company's distillery.
Courtesy of David Kidd

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 12:54 pm

When it comes to bourbon, Tom Lix doesn't believe in age discrimination. Most bourbons might age in the barrel for eight to 12 years or more, but Lix figures his are ready to drink in less than a week.

Lix makes Cleveland Whiskey, a new brand of bourbon that exemplifies two major trends in American whiskey-making today: the desire to speed up the process and the effort to establish a local identity.

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All Songs Considered
10:03 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Viking's Choice: Chuck Johnson Plays A Raga That Rages

Chuck Johnson.
Carly Hoopes Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 4, 2013 9:41 am

American Primitive music is flourishing right now. Electric and acoustic guitarists like William Tyler, Steve Gunn and Glenn Jones all have stellar releases out or on the way in 2013, and each digs different paths into this blues-based style.

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Iowa Court: List Both Same-Sex Parents On Birth Certificates

An Iowa couple and their daughter after a wedding ceremony on the first day same-sex marriage was legal in the state, in April 2009.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 10:57 am

Iowa's Supreme Court has ruled unanimously that the state's health department must include the names of both same-sex spouses as parents on a child's birth certificate.

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Fri May 3, 2013

3 Horses To Know In The Kentucky Derby

Goldencents training at Churchill Downs on May 1, 2013. Note: Due to an error in information provided by Getty Images, the original image with this post was of Golden Soul during one of its training sessions. We removed that image at 9:25 a.m. ET on May 5 and replaced it with this photo.
Andy Lyons Getty Images

Originally published on Sun May 5, 2013 7:27 am

This is a post for everyone (like us) who tunes into horse racing just once a year, on the first Saturday in May when the Kentucky Derby is run. Here are three horses that those who pay much closer attention say you should know about:

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Movie Reviews
9:41 am
Fri May 3, 2013

'Iron Man 3': Tony Stark As Homebrew Hero

In Iron Man 3, Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark (aka Iron Man), and Gwyneth Paltrow reprises hers as his girlfriend, Pepper Potts.
Paramout Pictures

Originally published on Fri May 3, 2013 2:01 pm

The third time might be the charm for some things, but the number three after a movie title is typically shorthand for a deal with the devil.

The studio thinks there's more money to be squeezed from a particular property, and voila: Spider-Man 3, Superman III, The Godfather — God help us — Part III. OK, The Godfather's a special case. Most other threes, though, are what happens when a too-thin plot meets a too-fat budget.

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NPR Story
8:49 am
Fri May 3, 2013

To Combat Rising Seas, Why Not Raise Up The Town?

When the Great Storm of 1900 battered Galveston, Texas, the town simply lifted itself up--in some places as much as 17 feet. Could a similar approach save cities today? Randy Behm of the US Army Corps of Engineers and Dwayne Jones of the Galveston Historical Foundation talk about the costs and feasibility of raising a town, albeit with better technology than Galveston's hand-cranked jacks and mules.

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