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Parallels
6:57 am
Mon August 12, 2013

India Unveils Locally Built Aircraft Carrier

Tugboats guide the INS Vikrant as it leaves the Cochin Shipyard after a launch ceremony in Kochi, India, on Monday. When it comes into full service in 2018, India will become the fifth nation to have designed and built its own aircraft carrier.
Manjunath Kiran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:53 pm

India unveiled its first locally built aicraft carrier, the INS Vikrant, on Monday.

Here's what the ship looks like:

With the $5 billion INS Vikrant, India joins a select group of nations that have built their own aircraft carriers. Others include:

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It's All Politics
6:53 am
Mon August 12, 2013

For Democrats And Republicans, It's Happily (N)ever After

Political discord tends to lead to disharmony in relationships.
iStockphoto.com

Amanda Northrup would never do it again.

She's dated Democrats in the past, but she found their acceptance of abortion heartbreaking and their support of President Obama nearly as off-putting.

"He was going off to celebrate Obama becoming president, and I felt betrayed and like he didn't understand me," recalls Northrup, who is 30 and works in real estate in Chattanooga, Tenn. "I think that's why eventually the two can't be together. It's such a big difference."

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Monkey See
6:31 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Can You Really Dissolve A Guy In A Bathtub? 'Mythbusters' Tackles 'Breaking Bad'

Adam Savage and Aaron Paul trade some information on Monday night's Mythbusters.
Don Feria Discovery

Perhaps you heard that last night, a plucky little drug dealer named Walter White returned to television for his last eight episodes of the award-hoarding Breaking Bad.

But before he began his life of crime, Walter White was a chemistry teacher, and chemistry is what originally made him such a great meth cook. Breaking Bad has always included a lot of science talk, especially in the early days, and the time has come for someone to see whether it holds up.

And by "someone," I mean "Mythbusters."

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The Two-Way
6:29 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Top Stories: Drug Law Changes; Egypt's Warning To Protesters

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 8:43 am

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The Two-Way
5:59 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Retired Idaho Sheriff Credited For Teen's Discovery

Mark John, the former sheriff who helped find Hannah Anderson.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:33 am

The key to the discovery of California teen Hannah Anderson and her alleged kidnapper on a mountain in Idaho appears to have been a chance meeting they had with an ex-sheriff, his wife and two friends who were out riding their horses.

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The Two-Way
5:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Book News: Does Lance Armstrong Have The Right To Lie In His Memoirs?

Lance Armstrong is being sued for false claims in his books, which were marketed as nonfiction.
Nathalie Magniez Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:47 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:01 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Holder Decries 'Draconian Mandatory Minimum Sentences'

The sun sets behind a guard tower at the federal prison in Terre Haute, Ind.
Scott Olson AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 1:50 pm

(We put a new top on this post at 1:40 p.m. ET.)

Arguing that it is "well past time to address persistent needs and unwarranted disparities," Attorney General Eric Holder on Monday laid out more of the Obama administration's thinking on changes it wants to make to the way nonviolent offenders are prosecuted and how they are punished.

"Our system is in too many ways broken," Holder told the American Bar Association at its annual meeting in San Francisco. "The course we are on is far from sustainable."

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Europe
4:48 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Taxi Riders In Oslo Surprised By Who's Driving Them Around

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. It's a truism that people say what they really mean, talking politics with a cabby. This summer, some taxi riders in Oslo got a surprise when they discovered Norway's prime minister behind the wheel. It was part of his reelection campaign, recorded on a video just released. Besides politics, he got an earful on his not so great driving, prompting him to concede the country is better off with him in high office than driving a cab. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Games & Humor
4:45 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Artists Hope Aliens Have A Sense Of Humor

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

You know that feeling of relief when someone let's you borrow their phone charger? Well, a couple artists think that sense of emotion could save us. They helped design a new satellite to look like a giant gadget charger. There's an inscription: Greetings Beleaguered Space Traveler. Welcome to the Universe's First Celestial Charging Station. One designer said he hopes this will make invaders stop and say: These guys are nice - we're not going to destroy their planet.

Business
4:28 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Premium Parking Space Comes With Big Price Tag

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: Premium Parking.

A parking spot in London is on the market for $465,000. That buys an outdoor location near Buckingham Palace and a 91-year lease.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The price tag is more than two spots sold in Boston this summer off and go for $280,000 apiece. But with London's daily parking go fees running at $60, it's actually a deal actually - at only $14 a day.

MONTAGNE: If you park there for 91 years.

GREENE: If. That's a big if.

Business
4:25 am
Mon August 12, 2013

U.S. Postal Service Reports Quarterly Losses

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more postal problems.

The United States Postal Service posted three quarters of a billion dollars in losses last quarter, making it nearly $4 billion so far this year. These losses come despite major trims to the operating budget in 2013. One immediate impact, it looks unlikely that Postal Service will be able to make a multibillion-dollar payment to a retiree benefits fund at the end of September. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Economy
3:48 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Sequestration Has Georgia Town On Edge

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Warner Robins, Ga., is a booming community that is entirely dependent on civilian Defense Department employment. The local Air Force Base is massive, but because it's mostly a logistics depot, the bulk of the employees are not service members.

Latin America
3:45 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Mexican Court Frees Drug Lord In DEA Agent's Death

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

The grisly murder of a U.S. Drug Enforcement agent in Mexico, back in 1985, was a milestone in the decades-long war on drugs. And the horror of that crime resurfaced this past Friday, after a Mexican court ordered the early release of the drug kingpin who masterminded that killing. Rafael Caro Quintero served 28 years of a 40-year sentence.

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Middle East
3:32 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Egypt's Government Warns Protest Camps Could Be Seized

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

In Cairo, a large gathering of supporters of ousted President Morsi are anticipating clashes with security forces. Egypt's Ministry of Interior says the camps could come under siege at any time. Protesters have their own barricades in place in preparation.

Around the Nation
3:21 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Heavy Rotation: Lluvia Con Sol Is A Hit At WEXT

Each month, NPR Music asks public radio personalities at member stations across the country to tell us about a song they can't get enough of. At member station WEXT, Ernesto Lechner is the co-host of the weekly music program, The Latin Alternative. His choice for August's installment of "Heavy Rotation" is "Lluvia Con Sol" by Orquesta el Macabeo.

Middle East
3:19 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Ahead Of Peace Talks, Israel Expands Settlements

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:21 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

Secretary of State John Kerry has invested time, effort and American prestige into finding a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. He is restarting a peace process that has been stalled for years. Direct talks between the parties are set to resume on Wednesday, in Jerusalem.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Mon August 12, 2013

'One Night In Miami', More Than Clay Beats Liston

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Transcript

RENE MONTAGNE, HOST:

We're going to hear now about a play on stage here in Los Angeles, though it's set in another hot city, it's called "One Night In Miami," and it's based on a real event. On February 25th, 1964, the young Cassius Clay defeated world heavyweight champion Sonny Liston. Clay, who would soon change his name to Muhammad Ali, celebrated his victory in a small hotel room with three of the most prominent African-Americans of the time.

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NPR Story
3:13 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Wildfires Destroyed 'Big Chunks Of My Childhood'

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:53 am

Wildfires are raging across the West. Colorado resident and Morning Edition commentator Craig Childs, a veteran of many fires, describes the long-term damage to the landscape. Child's latest book is Apocalypse Planet: Field Guide to the Future of the Earth.

The Salt
1:09 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Food Delivery Hits The Web, But Restaurants Pay The Price

A Seamless sticker is displayed next to the menu in the window of a restaurant in New York's Times Square on Saturday. Rivals Seamless and GrubHub said Friday that they have completed their combination, creating an online takeout company covering about 25,000 restaurants in 500 cities.
Mary Altaffer AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:56 am

Two big restaurant delivery websites — Grubhub and Seamless — have announced a merger. Together, they'll allow diners in 500 cities the convenience of ordering from thousands of restaurants with just a few clicks on their computer. For restaurants, the costs of being on these websites can be hard to swallow.

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Parallels
1:08 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Too Much, Too Fast: China Sees Backlash From Massive Growth

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:25 am

At a time when much of the world is mired in economic torpor, China still enjoys enviable growth rates. Yet there's no question that its economy is growing more slowly these days.

Just ask Yan Liwei, a salesman for a construction materials company, who was visiting a park in Shanghai this weekend.

"The number of new construction projects is declining somewhat. It's taking longer for many of our clients to pay us what they owe," Liwei says. "Many small and midsized developers are feeling a cash crunch."

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Parallels
1:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

The Complications Of Getting Running Water In The West Bank

Cement mixers in Rawabi, a planned Palestinian town in the West Bank, about 25 miles north of Jerusalem.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 10:10 am

Four enormous water tanks sit high on a hill in the West Bank. These hold the lifeblood for Rawabi, the first planned, privately developed Palestinian community, about 25 miles north of Jerusalem.

After five years, the first neighborhood is nearly built. But developer Bashar al-Masri is worried, because when it comes to water, Israel controls the spigot in the occupied West Bank.

"We're about to have people move into the city," he says, "and we still do not have a solid solution for the water."

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Shots - Health News
1:07 am
Mon August 12, 2013

New Muscle Drugs Could Be The Next Big Thing In Sports Doping

Belgian Blue bulls look like they are made of muscle because they have a mutation in the gene that codes for the protein myostatin. In humans, as in other types of cattle, myostatin normally limits the number of muscle fibers that form before birth and then limits the growth of those fibers later on.
Courtesy of Se-Jin Lee and Alexandra McPherron PNAS

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:03 am

Research intended to help people with muscle-wasting diseases could be about to launch a new era in performance-enhancing drugs.

The research has produced several muscle-building drugs now being tested in people with medical problems, including muscular dystrophy, cancer and kidney disease. The drugs all work by blocking a substance called myostatin that the body normally produces to keep muscles from getting too big.

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Keys To The Whole World: American Public Libraries
1:06 am
Mon August 12, 2013

For Disaster Preparedness: Pack A Library Card?

Volunteers at the Queens Library in the Far Rockaway section of Queens hand out coats to people affected by Hurricane Sandy.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 9:43 am

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, libraries in New York helped the storm's victims turn a new page. Librarians helped thousands of people fill out relief forms, connect to the Internet and make plans to rebuild.

The New Dorp branch of the New York Public Library in Staten Island wasn't damaged during Sandy. But just a few blocks away, houses were inundated with as much as 16 feet of water. And days after the storm, many of the library's patrons still lacked the most basic services.

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Photography
12:56 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Haunting Images Chronicle 165 Years Of A World At War

An American soldier reads a letter from home, while taking a break from repairing a tank tread in Lang Vei, Vietnam, in March 1971.
David Burnett/Contact Press Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 7:46 am

D-Day soldiers landing on Omaha Beach. A naked Vietnamese girl running from napalm. A Spanish loyalist, collapsing to the ground in death. These images of war, and some 300 others, are on view at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., in an exhibition called WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath. Pictures from the mid-19th century to today, taken by commercial photographers, military photographers, amateurs and artists capture 165 years of conflict.

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Code Switch
12:55 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Killed For Taking Part In 'Everybody's Fight'

Viola Liuzzo carries her shoes while walking with other civil rights activist before she was shot and killed in Alabama. Liuzzo-Prado says her mother walked barefoot whenever she could. "She just hated shoes." When her body was removed from the car she was shot in, she was barefoot.
Courtesy of the Liuzzo family

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 4:21 pm

For the past few months, NPR has been commemorating the monumental summer of 1963 by looking at watershed moments in the civil rights movement. In this three-part series, Karen Grigsby Bates talks with the children of civil rights leaders who lost their lives in the battle for racial equality.

In an obscure corner of Detroit, there's a battered playground honoring a civil rights martyr. It has an overgrown baseball field, some missing swings and on a broken fence, a worn, wooden sign.

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Environment
3:23 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

The Algae Is Coming, But Its Impact Is Felt Far From Water

Chinese beachgoers walk by an algae-covered public beach in Qingdao, China, in July. The seas off China have been hit by their largest-ever growth of algae, ocean officials say, with waves of green growth washing onto the shores.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 3:49 pm

Algae blooms are green or red or brown, slimy, smelly and you don't want it coming soon to a waterfront near you.

Most of us don't give a lot of thought to algae until the furry-like monstrosity is spreading over beaches, rivers, lakes and bays, but gigantic algae blooms have become an increasing problem around the world.

The danger algae blooms pose is that they sap the body of water where they are growing of nutrients and oxygen; they then die, decompose and rot.

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Music
2:51 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Trumpeters And Troubadours: New And Old Music From Italy

The band Canzoniere Grecanico Salentino is leading the revival of an old Italian folk style called taranta, which has hypnotic rhythms meant to have restorative powers.
Daniela Cardone Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 3:53 pm

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The Record
2:41 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Hip-Hop Turns 40

DJ Kool Herc hosted a party in the South Bronx in 1973 that is credited with kick-starting hip-hop.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 4:09 pm

Today marks the 40th anniversary of the day Clive "Kool Herc" Campbell threw his first party in the function room of 1520 Sedgwick Ave in the South Bronx. While that Kool Herc back-to-school party marks the official beginnings of the global culture we call hip-hop, what the mainstream media at large now calls "hip-hop" is a far cry from the creative culture that emerged following the gang truce between the warring tribes of the South Bronx. When most people say "hip-hop" what they're actually talking about is rap.

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Code Switch
1:56 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Amusement Parks And Jim Crow: MLK's Son Remembers

Martin Luther King Jr sits on a swing with his eldest daughter, Yolanda, and eldest son, Martin, at an amusement park he helped desegregate.
Courtesy of the King family

Originally published on Wed August 14, 2013 12:09 pm

In this three-part series, Karen Grigsby Bates talks with children of Medgar Evers, Viola Liuzzo and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. to see how they've coped with the burden and privilege of their legacies.

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Author Interviews
1:39 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

'Dressing Constitutionally': When Fashion And Laws Collide

Originally published on Thu August 22, 2013 8:19 am

How short is too short, according to the law? Wardrobe choices, or lack thereof, raise all sorts of issues — from First Amendment concerns to questions of equality, sexuality and control.

Ruthann Robson's new book, Dressing Constitutionally Hierarchy, Sexuality, and Democracy from Our Hairstyles to Our Shoes, examines anecdotes throughout history demonstrating the ways fashion and laws can conflict or influence one another. Robinson talks with Jacki Lyden, host of weekends on All Things Considered, about some of those examples.

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