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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Sun May 12, 2013

U.S. Gas Prices Expected To Remain Low For Summer

Gas prices are displayed on a board at a Hess station in Hoboken, N.J., Sunday. Lower oil and gasoline prices are giving relief to consumers who recently seemed about to face the highest prices ever.
CX Matiash AP

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 11:07 am

Drivers will find this summer's gas prices are lower than last year's, the result of a spike in crude oil production. Government forecasters say a gallon of regular gasoline will cost about $3.50 this summer — a slide of more than 10 cents from last year.

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The Two-Way
6:08 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Syrian Rebels Release U.N. Peacekeepers Near Golan Heights

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 8:31 am

Four Filipino peacekeepers are now free, days after being abducted by Syrian rebels. They had been patrolling near the area that divides Syria and the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. The rebels said Wednesday that the four had been held for their own protection. But Filipino officials say they were used as human shields.

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Asia
4:55 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Early Results In Pakistan Point To Ex-Premier

Partial, unofficial election results in Pakistan show former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's party as the clear victor. Defying militant threats millions of voters turned out and sent the incumbent Pakistan People's Party packing after five years of rule marked by corruption allegations and a failing economy. Host Rachel Martin gets more on the election from NPR's Julie McCarthy in Lahore.

Author Interviews
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Chasing A Dream, Speeding Down 'The Emerald Mile'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 6:03 am

Host Rachel Martin talks to writer Kevin Fedarko about his new book, The Emerald Mile, which tells the harrowing story of three men who ride the flooded Colorado River through the Grand Canyon.

Author Interviews
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

A 'Cooked Seed' Sprouts After All, In America

Cover of The Cooked Seed

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 12:16 pm

Anchee Min's best-selling memoir Red Azalea told the story of her youth in China during the Cultural Revolution. Her followup, The Cooked Seed, picks up nearly 20 years later as she arrives in America with $500 in her pocket, no English and a plan to study art in Chicago.

Min tells NPR's Rachel Martin that her life in China ended because of her relationship with Madame Mao, a former actress and the wife of Chairman Mao Zedong.

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Digital Life
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

He Didn't Just Call His Mother, He Made Her A Star

In My Mom on Movies filmmaker Joshua Seftel talks with his mom, Pat, about movies, pop culture and life by webcam.
Courtesy of Phillip Toledano

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 11:25 am

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Sunday Puzzle
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

This One Is For You, Ma

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

On-air challenge: You are given two words starting with M-A. The answer is a third word that can follow the first one and precede the second one, in each case to complete a compound word or a familiar two-word phrase.

Last week's challenge: Name a famous performer whose last name has six letters. Move the first three letters to the end — without otherwise changing the order of the letters — and add one more letter at the end. The result, in seven letters, will name a place where this person famously performed. Who is it, and what's the place?

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Animals
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Rhino Horns Fuel Deadly, Intercontinental Trade

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

NPR's Frank Langfitt and Gregory Warner have teamed up for a series about how myth and money are driving extraordinary slaughter of rhinos. They talk with host Rachel Martin about the issue, which has repercussions from the African continent all the way to Asia.

The Changing Lives Of Women
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

C-Sections Deliver Cachet For Wealthy Brazilian Women

Daniele Coelho holds her newborn daughter as doctors finish her cesarean section at the Perinatal Clinic in Rio de Janeiro on Aug. 2. Brazil has one of the world's highest rates of cesarean births.
Felipe Dana AP

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:11 pm

The office is immaculate, as you would expect in an upscale neighborhood in Sao Paulo — all sterile, white, modish plastic furniture and green plants. Behind the reception desk are pictures that would look more appropriate in a pop art gallery than a private maternity clinic.

The list of services at the clinic in Brazil's largest city is long: fertility treatments, specialized gynecology and, of course, obstetrics. But one thing they rarely do here is preside over a vaginal delivery.

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U.S.
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

First Female Fighter Pilot: 'Attention Wasn't What I Wanted'

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 6:29 am

Transcript

COLONEL JEANNIE LEAVITT: I was fascinated with flying. I loved everything about flying from the time I was a child. The more I learned about the more I just loved aviation and flying, and that's what made me want to be a pilot.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Around the Nation
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Back From Brink Of Death, Corpsman Tackles 'Warrior Games'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

Three years ago, Navy corpsman Angelo Anderson was shot in his arm and leg in Afghanistan and he thought he was going to die. Sunday, he's competing at the fourth-annual Warrior Games in Colorado, along with more than 200 wounded service members. Eric Whitney of Colorado Public radio has this profile of Anderson, who credits the paralympic-style competition with restoring him physically and mentally.

Sports
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Even In Basketball, Short Players Can Have Advantage

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

Host Rachel Martin speaks with NPR's Mike Pesca about the role of height in the NBA.

U.S.
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Gender Neutral: Armed Forces Submit Plans To End 'Exclusion'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

This coming week, the U.S. Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines are supposed to submit their plans for ending what's called the combat exclusion. This is the rule that says women cannot serve in most ground combat positions. The Pentagon announced plans to lift the ban earlier this year. The move comes as the military is under growing pressure to deal with an increasing number of sexual assault cases.

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Health
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

'More Than A Count,' Infant Mortality Is Societal Struggle

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

Infant mortality is an important indicator of the health of a nation, and decades-long efforts to improve birth outcomes are finally having an impact. Host Rachel Martin speaks with experts in the medical field who are working to promote healthy pregnancies and reduce infant mortality.

U.S.
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

For Graduation, UMass Dartmouth Hopes To Convey 'Real Story'

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 4:55 am

It's been an unusual semester at the Dartmouth campus of the University of Massachusetts. Accused Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was a student at the school, and three of his friends were also arrested on charges related to the bombing. Anne Mostue of WGBH reports the school and its students are trying to move beyond the bombing as they celebrate commencement this weekend.

Around the Nation
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

Bombing Suspect's Lawyer A Quiet Defender Of The Notorious

Defense Attorney Judy Clarke has defended Arizona mass shooter Jared Loughner, Unabomber Ted Kaczynski and 9/11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:11 pm

Unabomber Ted Kaczynski, Sept. 11 conspirator Zacarias Moussaoui and Arizona mass shooter Jared Loughner all have one thing in common: defense attorney Judy Clarke. With her help, all three avoided the death penalty.

Clarke routinely faces an enraged public, top-notch prosecutors and difficult, often disturbed clients. Now, Clarke is soon to face those things again with another high-profile client, alleged Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.

With such notorious clients, you might assume Clarke is tough, aggressive and happy in the spotlight.

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The Record
3:34 am
Sun May 12, 2013

The MIDI Revolution: Synthesizing Music For The Masses

Originally published on Sun May 12, 2013 5:44 am

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NPR Story
4:26 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

In Hollywood Twist, China Gets Its Own 'Iron Man'

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MOVIE, "IRON MAN 3")

ROBERT DOWNEY JR.: (as Tony Stark) No politics here. Just good old-fashioned revenge.

ARUN RATH, HOST:

That's Robert Downey Jr. in "Iron Man 3," which opened in theaters last weekend and has grossed nearly 800 million worldwide. The movie also broke box office records in China where Marvel Studios tried something new. They created a special cut that will only be seen by audiences in China and includes extra scenes featuring big-name Chinese actors.

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National Security
4:09 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

In Guantanamo, Have We Created Something We Can't Close?

The detention camp at the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo, Cuba, was established after the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks to hold suspects in the war on terror.
Michelle Shephard AP

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 5:26 pm

The crisis at the Guantanamo Bay detention camp keeps growing in size and intensity. According to the military's own count, 100 of the 166 men held in the prison there are now on hunger strike, and the 27 most in danger of dying are being force-fed.

Last month, guards had to forcibly subdue a camp where even the most cooperative detainees are held.

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Author Interviews
2:54 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

The 'Curious' Story Of Robert 'Believe It Or Not!' Ripley

Robert Ripley traveled the world collecting souvenirs like this Balinese lion mask.
Courtesy Ripley Entertainment

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 4:26 pm

Before there was YouTube or Mythbusters or The Amazing Race, there was Robert "Believe It or Not!" Ripley.

Ripley's pioneering mix of the strange, the shocking and the barely believable grabbed Americans' attention and grew his newspaper cartoon into a media empire.

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Music Interviews
2:54 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

LL Cool J On 'Accidental Racist' And Authenticity

LL Cool J's latest album is called Authentic.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:57 pm

LL Cool J has been making music for more than 25 years. Through it all, he says, he's tried his best to remain authentic.

"The last thing that I want to do is be a hack," says the rapper and actor, born James Todd Smith. "Someone who is adapting to whatever the current trend is, and manipulating the public into being on board with me even though, from an artistic standpoint, I'm not doing anything."

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

Pakistanis Brave Violence To Cast Historic Votes

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 4:26 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

In Pakistan today, millions went to the polls to elect new government. NPR's Julie McCarthy has been following the candidates, their campaigns and issues leading up to this. She joins us now from Lahore. Welcome, Julie.

JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Thank you.

RATH: So in the last 24 hours, we've heard a lot about the threats and violence aimed at stopping voters, and even shutting down polling places. What's the significance of this election? Can you put it into context for people?

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Shots - Health News
12:47 pm
Sat May 11, 2013

Dramatically Different Medicare Bills Set Hospitals Thinking

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Thu May 23, 2013 10:41 am

For the first time, the federal government has publicly shared what hospitals bill Medicare for the 100 most common diagnoses and treatments.

The information shows hospitals across the country — and across Alaska — bill dramatically different prices for the same things.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Sat May 11, 2013

In Cleveland, 30 Minutes Of Bravery Ended 10-Year Nightmare

It took neighbors' help for Amanda Berry to escape through the bolted storm door of the Cleveland home where authorities say she and two other women were held captive for nearly a decade. After she emerged, the women and Berry's daughter were rescued.
David Maxwell EPA /LANDOV

Until today, there's been a rush of news related to the kidnapping of three young women in Cleveland, their rescue after a decade in captivity and the chilling details that have emerged about what they went through. Now, the news has slowed. We suspect there will be less to report in coming days, but we'll watch for important developments.

There is a story to recommend, though:

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The Two-Way
9:41 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Experts Marvel At How Cyber Thieves Stole $45 Million

This week's massive cyber-heist was facilitated by the ease with which criminals have learned to hack the magnetic stripe on the back of ATM, debit and credit cards.
Timothy A. Clary AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 5:00 pm

With a haul of $45 million, it's being billed as possibly the biggest cyber-heist in history. But in reality, experts and authorities say, it was thousands of small but highly coordinated thefts.

As we reported on Thursday, federal prosecutors charged eight people with being the just New York cell of an operation that allegedly encompassed criminal cohorts in 26 countries.

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The Two-Way
8:49 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Emotions Run High After Boston Bombing Suspect's Burial

Some of the graves at the Al-Barzakh Islamic Cemetery in Doswell, Va., where the body of Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been buried. His grave was not identified to journalists.
Yuri Gripas Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 11:04 am

The news that Boston Marathon bombings suspect Tamerlan Tsarnaev has been buried in a rural cemetery just north of Richmond, Va., is causing controversy there.

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The Two-Way
8:11 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Pakistanis 'Defy Violence' To Vote In Landmark Election

Pakistani men lined up to vote in Rawalpindi on Saturday. Men and women cast ballots separately as millions went to the poll.
T. Mughal EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:17 pm

Despite attacks in the days and weeks leading up to Saturday's voting — and deadly bombings and other attacks on the very day they're going to the polls — Pakistanis are showing they're willing to "defy the violence," NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from Lahore.

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The Two-Way
7:11 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Schools? How About A Science Laureate At The Super Bowl?

Beyonce took the stage at this year's Super Bowl halftime show. Imagine a scientist instead. Perhaps dressed differently.
Michael DeMocker The Times-Picayune /Landov

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 8:11 am

The same scientist who famously "killed Pluto" (as a planet, that is) says it's "brilliant" that there's an effort underway in Congress to name a science laureate.

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Fresh Air Weekend
7:03 am
Sat May 11, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Messud, Volk And Scorsese

Animated as ever when it comes to the topic of film, director Martin Scorsese delivers the 2013 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities at the Kennedy Center on April 1.
NIcholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 9:12 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Simon Says
6:54 am
Sat May 11, 2013

The X-ray Vision Of Mothers

Mothers somehow know when we've been bad, but when times are tough, they also have our back.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat May 11, 2013 12:10 pm

Mothers have eyes in the back of their heads. They may not show up on X-rays, but they're there.

Like a lot of youngsters, I used to get my mother to turn her head so I could search through her hair for the eyeballs she claimed to have back there, telling her, "No you don't! No you don't!" But when I'd scamper off to another part of the apartment and pick up an ashtray or fiddle with the window blinds, I'd hear my mother's voice ring out, "I can see you! I know what you're up to!"

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