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Around the Nation
5:17 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Miss America Asks School To Reconsider Student's Punishment

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

When Miss America visited Patrick Farves high school, he asked her to the prom. She can't go, and the school punished him for asking. But she reportedly asked the school to rethink the suspension.

Business
5:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Honda Introduces Asimo To North America

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Asimo is Honda's latest humanoid robot. This one, the third version, is more life-like than previous models.

News
4:56 am
Mon April 21, 2014

The Boston Marathon Through The Eyes Of Two Men Who Love It

Boston Marathon race director Dave McGillivray (right) greets runners during the Boston Athletic Association 10K race in Boston last year.
Aram Boghosian Boston Globe via Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 4:32 pm

Dave McGillivray likely knows the Boston Marathon better than anyone else.

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The Two-Way
4:53 am
Mon April 21, 2014

It's Time To Run Again In Boston: Here's The Schedule

Runners, their friends and family members posed Sunday for photos at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, which is being run on Monday.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 10:15 am

We don't need to go on at length about why today's running of the Boston Marathon is important.

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Around the Nation
4:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Marathoners Take To Boston's Streets After Last Year's Bombing

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:03 am

The 118th Boston Marathon is being run on Monday. After last year's bombing that killed three people and injured more than 260 others, there is heavy security all along the marathon route.

Asia
4:15 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Obama Trip To Focus On Relations With Asia

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

President Obama sets off for Asia this week. He'll be visiting four countries - Japan, South Korea, Malaysia and the Philippines. The trip is part of the president's long-term strategy to refocus America's attention towards Asia, something that's proving a little bit hard to do.

NPR's Scott Horsley joins us now to talk about the trip. Good morning.

SCOTT HORSLEY, BYLINE: Good morning.

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Afghanistan
3:33 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Afghanistan Is Another Dangerous Place For Journalists

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

It was particularly difficult to report from Afghanistan during the recent presidential election because members of the Taliban were trying to disrupt the voting. They were also targeting Westerners.

Asia
3:22 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Gunmen Wound Pakistani TV Anchor In Weekend Shooting

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Hamid Mir, one of Pakistan's most famous journalists, was shot and wounded by gunmen as he was driving down a busy street in Karachi. It's the second such attack this month on a journalist.

Business
3:20 am
Mon April 21, 2014

U.S. Supreme Court To Hear Arguments In Argentina Debt Case

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Argentina and its teetering economy will be affected by case being heard today by the U.S. Supreme Court. The case goes back more than a decade and could have wide implications, not just for Argentina's economy, but also to relations with the U.S.

NPR's Laura Sydell reports.

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Asia
3:12 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Human Error Compounds Grief Over Korean Ferry Disaster

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We begin this part of the program by meeting a woman in limbo. She is searching for her sister who was a passenger on a South Korean ferry. Her story underlines the human cost of a ferry sinking in which more than 60 people died, more than 240 remain missing, people with connections to places around the world, including the United States.

NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter Dies At 76

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Hurricane Carter has died. He was 76 years old, a former boxer, a figure of controversy and, for some, a cause. Rubin Carter was his given name. He fought his first professional boxing match the day after he was released from prison in 1961. Later and more famously, he was in trouble with the law again, including on the night in 1966, when a triple murder was committed in Patterson, New Jersey.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

'Transcendence': Latest Sci-Fi Movie About Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 6:25 am

Transcendence is an ambitious and provocative film about the perils and pleasures of artificial intelligence that is intriguingly balanced between being a warning and a celebration.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Dominated By 1 Point Of View, Late-Night TV Needs New Voices

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

On Tuesday, Stephen Colbert stops by the CBS Late Show to greet the man he'll replace next year, David Letterman. It also spotlights a reality in late-night TV --almost every host is a white man.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Army's Updated Rules On Hair Styles Tangle With Race

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the Army has new rules on the dress and appearance of soldiers. The rules clamp down on tattoos, mohawks, long fingernails, dental ornamentation. So, diamond-studded teeth not allowed.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Army is also banning some hairstyles popular among African-American women. The stated goal here is professionalism, but some soldiers and even members of the Congressional Black Caucus are upset, and they are urging the Obama administration to take a second look at the rules.

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NPR Story
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Powdered Alcohol Approved By The Feds

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 5:53 am

Palchohol is powdered alcohol — just mix with water to create an instant cocktail. The creators of Palcohol pitched their idea as a solution to the soaring price of alcohol.

Code Switch
3:03 am
Mon April 21, 2014

In Asian-Majority District, House Race Divides Calif. Voters

Rep. Mike Honda (left) walks down the House steps with Rep. Raul Ruiz after a vote at the Capitol on March 20, 2013.
Bill Clark CQ-Roll Call

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:41 pm

In the heated race for a congressional seat in northern California, Mai Xuan Nguyen fought for her candidate with another cold call.

"Yes, that's K, H, A, N, N, A," she patiently explained in Vietnamese to a potential voter, spelling out her choice for Congress, Democrat Ro Khanna, as she marked her call list one recent evening at a coffeehouse in San Jose, Calif.

It was all part of Nguyen's role in an only-in-America scene: a Vietnamese-language phone bank for an Indian-American lawyer, who's challenging a Japanese-American congressman.

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All Tech Considered
1:44 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Who Should Pay To Keep The Internet's Locks Secure?

A lock icon signifies an encrypted Internet connection. But thanks to a recently discovered (and now fixed) bug, it's been bleeding out information for a few years.
Mal Langsdon Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:01 am

The encryption code unlocked by the Heartbleed bug last week provided vital security for some of the most widely used websites on the Internet. Fortune 1000 companies rely on the open source code for their core business. But it turns out no one is paying for it.

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Your Money
1:42 am
Mon April 21, 2014

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 12:15 pm

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all of this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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Shots - Health News
1:41 am
Mon April 21, 2014

For The Children's Sake, Put Down That Smartphone

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:43 am

It's not just kids who are overdoing screen time. Parents are often just as guilty of spending too much time checking smartphones and e-mail — and the consequences for their children can be troubling.

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Shots - Health News
1:40 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Scribes Are Back, Helping Doctors Tackle Electronic Medical Records

Medical scribe Connie Gayton keeps the electronic records, allowing orthopedic surgeon Devesh Ramnath to focus on his patients.
Brandon Thibodeaux for NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 7:43 am

Like many other doctors across the country, Dr. Devesh Ramnath, a Dallas orthopedic surgeon, recently made the switch from paper to electronic medical records. This meant he no longer had to just take notes when he was examining a patient — he also had to put those notes into the computer as a permanent record.

"I was really focused on just trying to get the information in, and not really focusing on the patient anymore," Ramnath says.

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Around the Nation
1:39 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Watchdog's New Target: Embattled LA Sheriff's Department

Prosecutor Max Huntsman delivers his closing arguments in the corruption trial of Angela Spaccia, the former city manager of Bell, Calif., in November. Huntsman's new challenge is to monitor the scandal-ridden LA County Sheriff's Department.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:59 am

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department is one of the nation's most troubled law enforcement agencies.

Eighteen current and former deputies are facing felony charges as part of a federal probe into allegations of widespread prisoner abuse in county jails. The federal government is also investigating alleged cases of deputies on patrol using excessive force during routine traffic stops, and targeting blacks and Latinos.

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First Listen
9:08 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

First Listen: Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band, 'Landmarks'

Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band's new album, Landmarks, comes out April 29.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 8:25 am

He's widely acknowledged as one of the best jazz drummers in the world. But he's also a singer-songwriter; a session man for Bob Dylan and Joni Mitchell; the son of a singing preacher man from Louisiana. And though a man of such experiences is, as you might expect, quite busy, he's also keeps his own signature band: Brian Blade & The Fellowship Band.

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Parallels
6:05 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

6 Things I Saw In Eastern Ukraine

A tank in Kramatorsk.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:57 am

Join NPR's London Correspondent Ari Shapiro Monday, April 21, at 2 p.m. Eastern Time, for a live Facebook chat about his reporting in Ukraine.

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National Security
3:18 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Hey, Kids, Remember You're On Our Side: The FBI Makes A Movie

YouTube

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

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News
3:12 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

In South Korea, Ferry Rescue Efforts Yield Only Grisly Results

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. It has been a grim Easter Sunday for relatives of passengers who were on the ferry that capsized off the coast of South Korea on Wednesday. The death toll from that disaster is now over 50, with about 240 people still missing, most of them high school students. Today, divers started retrieving bodies from inside the vessel.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Far From 'Infinitesimal': A Mathematical Paradox's Role In History

The 17th-century rivalry between English philosopher Thomas Hobbes, left, and English mathematician John Wallis lasted decades.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

Here's a stumper: How many parts can you divide a line into?

It seems like a simple question. You can cut it in half. Then you can cut those lines in half, then cut those lines in half again. Just how many parts can you make? A hundred? A billion? Why not more?

You can keep on dividing forever, so every line has an infinite amount of parts. But how long are those parts? If they're anything greater than zero, then the line would seem to be infinitely long. And if they're zero, well, then no matter how many parts there are, the length of the line would still be zero.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

A Scientific Experiment: Field Trips Just For Teachers

Science teachers huddle over bacteria colonies at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry. The museum plans to train 1,000 area educators to be better science teachers in the next five years.
Linda Lutton WBEZ

Originally published on Sun April 20, 2014 4:43 pm

In a classroom across from the coal mine exhibit at the Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, students are huddled around tables, studying petri dishes of bacteria.

But these aren't school-age kids — these students are all teachers, responsible for imparting science to upper-elementary or middle-school students.

That's a job that many here — and many teachers in grammar schools around the country — feel unprepared for.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

California's Drought Ripples Through Businesses, Then To Schools

Cannon Michael's farm grows tomatoes, melons and onions, among other crops. This year, however, Michael will have to fallow one-fifth of the land due to the drought
Thomas Dreisbach NPR

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 9:16 am

Cannon Michael runs an 11,000-acre farm in California's Central Valley. His family has been farming in the state for six generations.

Michael's multimillion-dollar operation usually provides a wealth of crops including tomatoes, onions and melons. But recently, he's pretty pessimistic about work.

"It is going to be a year that's probably, at best, maybe break even. Or maybe lose some money," Michael tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:00 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Honey, Blood And Harmony: Jordi Savall's Balkan Journey

Early music specialist Jordi Savall has turned his attention to the widely varied music of the Balkans. "For me," he says, "it's one of the most exciting projects that happened in the last 20 years."
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 11:42 am

Jordi Savall has made a career of reviving ancient music. Whatever the age of the songs, though, he doesn't play them as museum-piece recreations, preserved in isolation. Savall takes great pleasure in smashing together music from different times and different cultures.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Sun April 20, 2014

Ferry Transcript Shows Confusion And Panic: 'Please Come Quickly'

A relative waits for word of missing passengers of a sunken ferry in Jindo, South Korea. A newly released transcript depicts a scene of confusion on the stricken ferry as it sank.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 3:56 am

For more than 40 minutes as their ship foundered last Wednesday, crew members of the South Korean ferry Sewol spoke with local maritime traffic services about a possible rescue. The conversation centered on getting help to the ship and on getting its passengers off the ferry, according to a transcript released Sunday.

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