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The Two-Way
2:43 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

State Department Orders U.S. Personnel Out Of Lebanon

Supporters of the Syrian regime demonstrate in front of the U.S. Embassy east of Beirut on Friday.
Hussein Malla Associated Press

The State Department has ordered all nonessential U.S. government personnel out of Lebanon and approved a voluntary evacuation of Turkey ahead of a possible strike on Syria.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Job Applicants Made To Dance: 'Like A Scene Out Of The Office'

Ricky Gervais, who played the role of boss David Brent in the original British version of The Office.
Associated Press

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 4:36 pm

It sounds like something out of a sitcom; in this case, the original British television version of The Office: job seekers being compelled to dance for a chance at a sales position at a U.K. electronics retailer.

Applicant Alan Bacon, who hoped for a position at a Currys Megastore in Cardiff, was made to do "rubbish robotics in my suit in front of a group of strangers" to the French electronic duo Daft Punk's "Around the World."

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The Two-Way
12:31 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Feds Asked Yahoo For Data 12,444 Times In First Half Of Year

Yahoo's new logo.
Yahoo.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:38 pm

Adding its experience to those of other major browsers and social media sites, Yahoo said Friday that it received 29,470 requests from governments around the world for user data in the first six months of 2013.

Of that total, 12,744 — 42 percent — came from the U.S. government, Yahoo says.

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The Two-Way
12:26 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Deep In The Pacific, Scientists Discover Biggest Volcano On Earth

Tamu Massif 3D map
William Sager University of Houston

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 11:10 am

The world's largest volcano has until now been lurking undiscovered in the depths of the Pacific Ocean, according to a team of scientists who identified the massive object and reported their findings in the latest issue of Nature Geoscience.

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Shots - Health News
12:21 pm
Fri September 6, 2013

Turns Out Your Kids Really Did Love That Music You Played

Mom loved him. You love him. Prince performing in 1985.
Ron Wolfson Landov

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 8:17 am

Way back in the 1980s, were you the one playing "When Doves Cry" over and over? Well, don't be surprised if your kids wind up doing the same thing.

Young adults have strong positive memories of the music their parents loved when they were the same age, a study finds. That flies in the face of the cultural stereotype that children reject their parents' taste in music.

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Music Reviews
11:52 am
Fri September 6, 2013

The Dawn Of Sun Records: 15 Hours Of Blues

The Prisonaires, a band formed in a Memphis-area prison, created one of Sun Records' early hits.
Courtesy of Bear Family Records

Sam Phillips is famous for saying that if he could find a white boy with the authentic Negro sound and feel, he'd make a billion dollars. Seeing Phillips in his striped sport coat and tie in 1950, you might well wonder if he'd know that sound and feel if it came up and bit him. But he'd been a fan of blues and country music since childhood, and he bet that his technical knowledge and feeling for this music could make him money.

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All Tech Considered
11:51 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Encryption Disrupted; Anonymity Online

Circuit board
Marilyn Nieves iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:09 pm

Monday's Labor Day holiday shortened our week, but there was no shortage of news in the tech space. Herewith, our weekly roundup to help catch you up.

ICYMI

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The Two-Way
11:43 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Dutch Court Rules Government Liable For 3 Srebrenica Deaths

Relatives of Rizo Mustafic react after the Dutch Supreme Court ruled the Netherlands was responsible for the deaths of Mustafic and two other Bosnian Muslim men during the Srebrenica massacre in 1995.
Martijn Beekman EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:53 pm

The Dutch Supreme Court has ruled that the Netherlands is responsible for the deaths of three Muslim men during the infamous Srebrenica massacre in 1995. More than 7,000 Bosnian Muslim boys and men were killed in the massacre, considered to be the worst on European soil since World War II.

At the time, Dutch peacekeeping forces had ordered the men to leave a United Nations compound when it was attacked by Bosnian Serb forces.

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The Two-Way
11:35 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Friday's Moon Launch Visible To A Potential 85 Million

An unmanned Minotaur rocket carries NASA's newest robotic explorer, the LADEE spacecraft, into Earth orbit and then to the moon.
Carla Cioffi AP

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 4:07 am

Updated, 11:40 p.m. EDT

The LADEE spacecraft is on its way to the moon. The rocket and its two-stage separation was visible at least from the Washington D.C. suburbs, and likely up and down the East Coast, given the clear skies.

Our original post:

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Code Switch
11:03 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The KKK?

NAACP leaders from the Casper, Wyo., branch speak with members of the KKK at a heavily guarded meeting this past week.
Alan Rogers Casper Star-Tribune

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

"I think all my first dates were probably less awkward than this," says Jeremy Fugleberg, referring to the NAACP's meeting on Saturday night with the Ku Klux Klan in a hotel conference room in Casper, Wyo. Fugleberg is assistant managing editor for news at the Casper Star-Tribune and reported on the gathering.

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The Protojournalist
10:43 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Quick Question: Can Only The Rich Be President?

Donald Trump says he is considering running for president in 2016.
Robin Marchant Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:31 am

Do you have to be rich to be president of the United States of America?

Donald Trump told ABC News recently that he might run for president in 2016 and that he is qualified because, among other reasons, he has amassed a net worth of more than $10 billion. "I'd spend a lot" on a campaign, he says. "I'd spend whatever it took."

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Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz
10:36 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Chuck Mangione On Piano Jazz

Chuck Mangione.
Courtesy of the artist

Flugelhorn player Chuck Mangione is widely known for the crossover success of his catchy mid-1970s tunes. But his jazz credentials are rock-solid: His mentor Dizzy Gillespie once recommended him for a spot in Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers. Mangione and bassist Gary Mazzaroppi team up with host Marian McPartland for some dynamic trio work in a session from 1999, including his famous tune "Feels So Good" and a few beloved standards.

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Barbershop
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Gearing Up For Football Season

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Economy
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Five Years After Wall Street Collapsed, What's Changed?

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 8:36 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later, it sounds like a bad walks-into-a-bar joke, but it wasn't. Recently, a representative of the KKK had a sit-down with members of the NAACP. This took place in Casper, Wyoming. Reporter Jeremy Fugleberg was there for the whole thing, and tells us what happened. That's in just a few minutes.

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Politics
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Republicans Divided Over Potential Strike On Syria

Republican congressional leaders support an American military strike in Syria, but the rank-and-file membership is divided. GOP Congressmen Doug Collins of Georgia and Luke Messer of Indiana serve on the House Committee on Foreign Affairs. They talk about the debate in the Republican caucus.

Race
10:04 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Did The NAACP Learn Anything From Meeting With The Klan?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:02 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Hitler's Last Bodyguard Dies; Was With The Fuhrer In Bunker

Rochus Misch, one of Adolf Hitler's bodyguards, in 1944. He died Thursday in Germany at the age of 96.
AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 2:35 pm

Rochus Misch, "Adolf Hitler's devoted bodyguard for most of World War II and the last remaining witness to the Nazi leader's final hours in his Berlin bunker," has died, The Associated Press reports.

Misch was 96. He died Thursday in Germany.

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The Two-Way
10:00 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Antitrust Monitor Ordered For Apple Over E-Book Price Fixing

Amazon's Kindle e-reader. Apple has been ordered to submit to a monitor to ensure it doesn't fix prices on e-books in future.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:44 am

A federal judge who found Apple guilty of colluding with publishers in an e-book price-fixing scheme ordered the tech giant on Friday to modify its contracts and submit to oversight to make sure it doesn't happen again.

The injunction issued by U.S. District Judge Denise Cote in Manhattan against orders the iPad maker to hire an external compliance monitor for two years to supervise the company's antitrust compliance efforts, The Associated Press reports.

Cupertino, Calif.-based Apple says it plans to appeal.

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Krulwich Wonders...
9:52 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What We Can Never, Ever Know: Does Science Have Limits?

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:10 am

I got two books in the mail that, if they could have, would've poked, scratched and ripped each others' pages out. I don't know if Martin Gardner and Patricia Churchland ever met, but their books show that there are radically, even ferociously, different ways to think about science. Gardner died last year. He was a science writer whose monthly "Mathematical Games" column in Scientific American was wildly popular. Patricia Churchland is a philosopher who teaches at U.C. San Diego.

The issue between them is: How much can we know about the universe?

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Shots - Health News
8:45 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Scientists Put A 'Sixth Sense' For Numbers On Brain Map

A sixth sense? A small patch of neurons on either side of the brain recognizes how many dots are on a screen. As more dots appear, active neurons shift to the right.
Courtesy of Ben Harvey/Utretch University

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 10:25 am

One of the most famous scenes in the movie Rain Man unfolds when a waitress drops a box of toothpicks on the floor. Dustin Hoffman's character, Ray, takes a look and says, "82, 82, 82." He quickly sums the numbers, declaring, "Of course, 246 total."

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Interviews
8:43 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Katey Sagal, Holding Court On 'Sons Of Anarchy'

Katey Sagal as Gemma Teller Morrow in Sons of Anarachy on FX.
Prashant Gupta FX

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 11:51 am

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 31, 2012.

As Gemma, the fierce matriarch of the biker gang in the FX series Sons of Anarchy, Katey Sagal has shot and killed people, hit somebody with a skateboard, pulled a gun on a baby and done other horrible things. It's all part of the challenge of playing the character, Sagal says.

"She does things in the name of loyalty, which I relate to, but she goes way beyond anything I would do."

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Obama To Address Nation About Syria On Tuesday

President Obama during his news conference Friday in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 8:44 am

Saying he will continue to "make the best case" in coming days for taking military action against the regime of Syrian President Bashar Assad, President Obama has announced that he will speak to the American people Tuesday about why he's come to that conclusion.

Obama's statement came Friday at the start of a news conference he's holding in St. Petersburg, Russia, where the G-20 Summit of world leaders wrapped up Friday. He spoke for about 50 minutes. We followed along. Scroll down to see what the president had to say.

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TED Radio Hour
7:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What Does YouTube Tell Us About Millennials?

Ryan Lash TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 5 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Kevin Allocca's TEDTalk

YouTube Trends Manager Kevin Allocca watches and thinks about popular videos for a living. He talks about how interactive participation has become a crucial part of entertainment — and that Millennials will only demand more.

About Kevin Allocca

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TED Radio Hour
7:58 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is It Ok To Use The M-Word?

Neil Howe coined the term "millennials" back in 1991.
Neil Howe

Originally published on Sat September 7, 2013 10:27 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Neil Howe's Interview

When demographer Neil Howe first coined the term Millennial back in 1991, he didn't expect it to become a loaded word for a generation some call lazy and entitled. But Howe is optimistic about this generation — and so are lots of Millennials.

About Neil Howe

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The Two-Way
7:56 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Obama Has No 'Intention' To Strike Syria If Congress Says No

President Obama on Friday at the G-20 Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia.
Kevin Lamarque Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 9:22 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': White House adviser Tony Blinken talks with NPR's Steve Inskeep

"The president of course has the authority to act" even if Congress does not support his plan for a military strike on Syria, White House deputy national security adviser Tony Blinken told Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep earlier today.

But Blinken also said of the president that it is "neither his desire nor his intention to use that authority absent Congress backing him."

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Parallels
7:51 am
Fri September 6, 2013

The Deadly Checkpoint That Divides Syria's Biggest City

Syrian rebel fighters run run for cover during clashes Wednesday with government forces in Aleppo. Syria's largest city has been bitterly divided since heavy fighting broke out more than a year ago. The government army controls the western part of the city; the rebels control the east. Residents risk sniper fire as they cross back and forth.
Aleppo Media Center AP

Originally published on Fri September 6, 2013 9:39 am

It's a typical day — which means it's a very dangerous one — at the Karaj al-Hajez crossing point that separates the eastern part of Aleppo that's held by Syrian rebels and the western part that's held by President Bashar Assad's army.

Despite the risks, street vendors still shout about their merchandise on offer and residents carry on with their daily shopping. An old man urges his wife to hurry so they can cross back to the other side before trouble erupts, which it does with regularity.

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

What Does It Mean To Be A Teenage Feminist Today?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Tavi Gevinson's TEDTalk

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is There A Better Way To Find Work?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 4 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Charlie Hoehn's TEDTalk

Charlie Hoehn graduated college during a recession, constantly hearing the mantra, "You've got to take what you can get." But after months of rejection, he stopped following that advice. He describes how he built a career by working for free.

About Charlie Hoehn

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

Is 30 Really The New 20?

James Duncan Davidson TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Meg Jay's TEDTalk

Psychologist Meg Jay has a message for twenty-somethings: just because marriage, work and kids happen later, doesn't mean you can't start planning now. She tells twenty-somethings how they can reclaim adulthood in the defining decade of their lives.

About Meg Jay

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TED Radio Hour
7:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

How Can Young People Make An Impact?

courtesy of TED

Originally published on Thu December 26, 2013 11:55 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Next Greatest Generation?

About Natalie Warne's TEDTalk

At 18, Natalie Warne's work with the Invisible Children movement made her a hero for young activists. She calls on young people not to let age stop them from changing the world.

About Natalie Warne

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