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Parallels
12:45 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

You Face A U.S. Legal Problem. Where Should You Run?

U.S. chess grandmaster Bobby Fischer, shown in 1971, a year before he won the world's most famous chess match, fled to Iceland in 2005 to avoid prosecution in the U.S. He remained there until his death in 2008.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 1:22 pm

Let's say you are an American facing prosecution and you want to escape the long arm of the American law. Where's the best place to go?

Iceland, perhaps, and we'll get to that in a moment.

Edward Snowden, who faces potential prosecution after declaring that he leaked details of a highly classified U.S. intelligence program, caught a flight to Hong Kong.

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It's All Politics
12:39 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Partisan Feuds Roll On In IRS Investigation

It would be a vast understatement to say that Republican Rep. Darrell Issa (right) of California and Democratic Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland don't see eye to eye on the IRS scandal's latest development.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 1:09 pm

It looks like things may be getting even uglier than usual over in the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

The panel now headed by Rep. Darrell Issa, a California Republican, has long been a place to watch partisan tempers fly.

But the assertion by the panel's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, that the investigation into the Internal Revenue Service's targeting of conservative groups should be closed appears to have only escalated the bad feelings that already existed.

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Author Interviews
12:24 pm
Mon June 10, 2013

Flying High And Low In 'Full Upright And Locked Position'

In Full Upright and Locked Position aviation consultant Mark Gerchick looks at post-Sept. 11 air travel.
W.W. Norton & Co.

No, you aren't imagining it: There is indeed less leg room on some airplanes than there used to be.

"Back in the old days, probably 20 years ago, the tendency was to have about 34 inches," says Mark Gerchick, a former chief counsel for the Federal Aviation Administration. "Now the standard is about 31 inches in the United States. ... Some of the low-cost airlines have tightened that up to about 28 inches, which is now approaching the limits of anatomical possibility."

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The Two-Way
11:59 am
Mon June 10, 2013

With Nod To 'Texts From Hillary' Guys, Clinton Joins Twitter

Will some of her tweets be as funny as the made-up "texts from Hillary?"
@HillaryClinton

"Thanks for the inspiration @ASmith83 & @Sllambe - I'll take it from here... #tweetsfromhillary"

With that bit of social media swagger on Monday, @HillaryClinton joined Twitter.

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The Two-Way
11:49 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Butt Slap Lands Ex-NFL Star Chad Johnson In Jail

Former Miami Dolphins receiver Chad Johnson.
J. Meric Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 12:59 pm

Chad Johnson — the NFL star formerly known as Chad Ochocinco for his jersey number — was minutes from having part of his life back on track. Johnson, who had pleaded no contest to head-butting his ex-wife, was about to seal a plea-deal that called for community service and counseling instead of jail time, when he did something that made the entire court room erupt in laughter.

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The Two-Way
11:38 am
Mon June 10, 2013

What Is Meant By The Term 'Whistle-Blower'

In a video interview with The Guardian, Edward Snowden says he exposed NSA monitoring because "the public needs to decide whether these programs and policies are right or wrong."
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA/Landov

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:22 am

When Edward Snowden came out as the source of leaks about the National Security Agency's surveillance programs, he was immediately labeled a whistle-blower by many.

Is the term a misnomer?

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Mon June 10, 2013

CBS News: Memo Alleges State Dept. Influence Over Investigations

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 2:13 pm

CBS News has obtained what it says is a memo written by the State Department's investigative arm indicating that some of its investigations into allegations of illegal and inappropriate behavior of department employees were "influenced, manipulated, or simply called off."

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New In Paperback
11:19 am
Mon June 10, 2013

June 10-16: A Terrorist, A Fabulist, A Worrier And Lost Orphans

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 11:20 am

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Music Reviews
11:06 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Arctic Records: Drafting A Blueprint For The Philly Sound

Barbara Mason had had one minor hit on Arctic by the time "Yes I'm Ready" came out in March 1965, and hit the Top 10 on both the R&B and pop charts.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 12:24 pm

Arctic Records opened for business late in 1964. The label was the brainchild of Jimmy Bishop, the program director of WDAS — at the time Philadelphia's No. 1 black radio station. If that sounds like a conflict of interest, you don't know much about the music business in Philadelphia back then. Besides, it didn't help Arctic's first single, "Happiest Girl in the World" by the Tiffanys, three local teenagers who sang backup in various studios.

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All Songs Considered
11:03 am
Mon June 10, 2013

First Watch: Young Galaxy, 'New Summer'

Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 2:01 pm

The latest video for the Canadian electro-pop band Young Galaxy is a study in stark, disturbing contrasts. "Here it comes again, the beautiful, warm weather," sings frontwoman Catherine McCandless, just as all hell breaks loose.

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The Salt
11:00 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Politician

Artist's rendering

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 2:36 pm

The Sandwich Monday crew is out of the office today, at a staff retreat where they're probably going to make us exercise. Still, here's a quick take on a new sandwich from one of our favorite spots.

The arrival of a new sandwich at Tudor's Biscuit World in West Virginia is a lot like that scene in The Lion King: Somebody takes the biscuit to the edge of a cliff and holds it out for all of Appalachia to behold, and all the animals rejoice, except the animals who end up on the biscuit.

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The Two-Way
10:50 am
Mon June 10, 2013

For Bobby Fischer, WikiLeaks & NSA Leaker, Iceland Is Haven

Former world chess champion Bobby Fischer in March 2005 as he left Japan for Iceland, where he lived out his final years.
Yuriko Nakao Reuters /Landov

Edward Snowden, the former CIA and Booz Allen computer security technician who says he leaked information about National Security Agency surveillance programs, has told The Guardian that he wants "to seek asylum in a country with shared values

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Photography
9:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

'Capturing Love': How To Photograph Same-Sex Weddings

If you've ever looked through a wedding album, you've seen photos of the groom removing his bride's garter or dipping her on the dance floor. But those poses could be awkward or even offensive for same-sex couples. A new book Capturing Love could help avoid problems. Host Michel Martin learns tips from co-authors Kathryn Hamm and Thea Dodds.

Music
9:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

New Mantra Makes Chrisette Michele's Music 'Better'

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 3:25 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. R&B singer Chrisette Michele burst on to the scene in 2007 with her first album, "I Am." Her melodic and unique voice caught a lot of ears and earned her a Grammy for the single, "Be Okay."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "BE OKAY")

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Economy
9:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Despite Images Of Affluence, LGBT Poverty High

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 1:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Here in the U.S., June is known as gay and lesbian pride month, recognizing the contributions and concerns of LGBT people in this country. Later, we'll talk with two people on the cutting edge of what's become one of the markers of LGBT progress. They are the authors of a new book about how to photograph same-sex weddings. There are some interesting similarities and differences that might surprise you.

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Politics
9:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

How Serious Is The NSA Data Leak?

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 1:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
9:26 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Designated Drivers Often Fail To Abstain From Drinking

Has the person taking the car keys been drinking, too?
Jacom Stephens iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:45 am

We might need to change the definition of a designated driver from noble abstainer to something along the lines of not as drunk as you.

The idea of having one person in a group agree not to drink so that everyone else can get home safely after a night of alcohol-fueled fun has been promoted as a way to reduce the dangers of drunken driving, especially among teenagers and young adults.

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The Two-Way
8:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

No Decisions Yet On The Most-Anticipated Supreme Court Cases

An artist's sketch of the scene during a U.S. Supreme Court hearing earlier this year.
Art Lien Reuters / Landov

There's no big news again today from the U.S. Supreme Court — which is sort-of big news in itself because it means we're still waiting for the justices' decisions on these major cases:

-- Fisher v. University of Texas, a key test of affirmative action in higher education.

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The Two-Way
7:59 am
Mon June 10, 2013

S&P Upgrades U.S. Credit Outlook To 'Stable'

Citing improved tax receipts and some steps taken to address the country's long-term budget issues, Standard & Poor's upgraded the United States credit outlook to "stable." As Reuters reports, the credit rating agency said the chance of a downgrade to the country's credit rating is "less than one in three."

Reuters reports:

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The Two-Way
7:32 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Daniel Ellsberg: NSA Leaker Showed Battlefield Courage

Daniel Ellsberg; Jan. 16, 2010.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 10:58 am

Daniel Ellsberg, who leaked the Pentagon Papers in 1971, says Edward Snowden, the man who leaked top secret documents about an NSA surveillance program, showed "the kind of courage that we expect of people on the battlefield."

Ellsberg, who became one of the first to be prosecuted under the 1917 Espionage Act, told CNN that if he had been in Snowden's position, he would have broken the law in an act of civil disobedience.

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Trayvon Martin Killing: 2 Sides Want Very Different Jurors

George Zimmerman, the man accused of second-degree murder in the shooting death of Trayvon Martin.
Joe Burbank / Orlando Sentinel MCT /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:59 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Greg Allen previews the George Zimmerman trial

Nearly 16 months after the shooting death of African-American teenager Trayvon Martin in Sanford, Fla., the man charged with second-degree murder is due in court Monday for the start of his trial.

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Monkey See
6:23 am
Mon June 10, 2013

The Tony Awards: Is This The Greatest Awards Show Opening Ever?

NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 09: Host Neil Patrick Harris and casts of Broadway shows perform onstage at The 67th Annual Tony Awards at Radio City Music Hall on June 9, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Andrew H. Walker/Getty Images for Tony Awards Productions)
Andrew H. Walker Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 8:57 am

Unless you've seen every awards show since the dawn of time (which would make you The Unluckiest Person In The World), you can't really answer the question of whether last night's opener of the Tony Awards, hosted for the fourth time by Neil Patrick Harris, was the best opening ever.

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The Two-Way
5:50 am
Mon June 10, 2013

After Igniting In 2nd Half, Heat Easily Beat Spurs In Game 2

Oh no you don't: The Miami Heat's LeBron James (right) rejects a slam dunk attempt by the San Antonio Spurs' Tiago Splitter during Sunday night's game in Miami.
Mike Segar Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 6:56 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman reports on Game 2 of the NBA finals

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Europe
5:34 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Swedish Commuter Rail Engineers Get Around Dress Code

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In Stockholm, engineers on the Swedish commuter rail line have found a new way to skirt a dress code. The drivers were told no more shorts, even though the heat in the cab can top 95 degrees - just long pants or skirts. So many of the male engineers are now wearing skirts. Women are allowed to, so the company says it will not discriminate. Something tasteful in an A-line, or pleats, perhaps? It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:29 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Deputies Help Deer With Doritos Bag Stuck On Its Head

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

Key deer in Florida are an endangered species. Their diet includes leaves and berries - definitely not Doritos - which does not mean a deer can't get cravings. Sheriff's deputies on patrol in the Florida Keys spotted one on the side of the road, with an empty bag of Doritos stuck on its head. It must have wanted the last chip in the bottom, a deputy told the South Florida Sun Sentinel. The deer stood calmly as the deputies removed the bag.

The Two-Way
5:16 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Who Is Edward Snowden, The Self-Styled NSA Leaker?

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Mon June 10, 2013 8:21 am

  • From 'Morning Edition': Tom Gjelten on the NSA leaks

Edward Snowden, the 29-year-old former CIA technical assistant who has stepped forward to say he's the source of explosive leaks about government surveillance programs was among "thousands upon thousands" of such analysts hired to manage and sift through "huge amounts of data," NPR's Tom Gjelten

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Parallels
5:15 am
Mon June 10, 2013

In Venezuela, A Family Blames The Police For Their Misery

Eloisa Barrios visits the humble graves of nine male family members in the Guanayen cemetery. She says all nine were killed by the police, in what was a vendetta against her family. Recently, a 10th member of the family was stabbed to death. He was 17.
Meridith Kohut for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 3:05 pm

The story of Venezuela's Eloisa Barrios is especially revealing because so many of her relatives have been killed. Revealing because of who she believes pulled the trigger.

Some weeks ago, Barrios climbed into our van for a drive to a cemetery. The burial ground is outside a village in the Venezuelan countryside. We went there to visit the Barrios family dead.

She told us nine relatives had been killed in shootings over the past 15 years. All nine were young men.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Jeannette Walls' 'Silver Star' Lacks Spunk And Direction

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:11 am

"You've got spunk," Lou Grant says to Mary Richards on the very first episode of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. And then he adds, famously, "I hate spunk." The year is 1970, the same year in which Jeannette Walls set her new novel, The Silver Star. In the book, someone tells the 12-year-old narrator, Bean Holladay, that she's got spunk too. Maybe it's no coincidence. 1970, after all, was situated squarely in the middle of second-wave feminism. It was an era when women and girls were asserting themselves and finding their voices, which weren't always met with approval.

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Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
5:03 am
Mon June 10, 2013

Sneak Preview: 5 Books To Look Forward To This Summer

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 8:28 am

My summer reading preferences are so particular they have, at times, stopped me from reading at all. I need a romance for a train trip — for obvious reasons. When it's hot, I prefer something with no climate congruence at all; I've never enjoyed Anna Karenina so much as I did on the beach (that romance is a train exception — er ... for obvious reasons). When I'm on a plane trip, I like a passel of good young-adult novels, filled with cliffhangers, reversals and quick emotion. It's a mood makeover in flight.

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