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Animals
5:19 am
Fri June 14, 2013

European Pet Passport Lets Animals Travel To E.U. States

Originally published on Mon June 17, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

The European Union is a big fan of traveling pets. It has pet passports that allow them to travel through all the member states. Still, until this week there was a limit. Travelers could only take up to five pets across the borders. Now, thanks to a pet-loving member of the EU Parliament, those who prefer to travel with herds of animals are now free to roam, as long as they're heading for a competition or a sporting event.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Religion
5:18 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Harley Davidson Sends Pope Francis Gifts

The company sent the pope two motorcycles and a leather jacket. The occasion is a gathering of bikers in Vatican City this weekend hoping for a blessing of the motorbikes.

Critics' Lists: Summer 2013
5:03 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Secrets Of The Universe: 5 Great SF And Fantasy Summer Reads

Andrew Bannecker

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 1:03 pm

This summer, you can expect to be profoundly haunted by some of the best works of speculative fiction the season has to offer. The protagonists in these novels are mobbed by the ghosts of history, by the re-awakened dead, and by their recollections of traumas so formative that they transcend personal experience to become species memory. They are also, somewhat humorously, dogged by all the secret truths that have been edited out of Wikipedia entries.

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Middle East
3:38 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Voters Cast Ballots In Iran's Presidential Election

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:56 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Syria's ally Iran, people are voting for president today. It is Iran's first presidential election since the stunning vote in 2009. Back then, a surprisingly early declaration of victory for President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad sparked a wave of protests, followed by years of government repression. This time around, six candidates are contending for power amid widespread skepticism about the election, and intensive security on the streets.

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Latin America
3:38 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Venezuelan Joggers Find Safety In Numbers

Some participants run for a mile, while some run for up to six miles.
Meridith Kohut for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 2:05 pm

It's dusk on a recent day in Venezuela's capital, Caracas, and for many, that's a signal to get inside. Crime and violence have become so widespread here, many people simply shut themselves in.

"Your house becomes your own prison," says Arturo Hidalgo. After about 8 or 9 at night, he says, "you better be home because otherwise you can get in trouble."

Hidalgo would know: He's been robbed before. The result, he says, is a deep-seated fear. For an avid runner, that's a problem.

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World
3:38 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Talks In Turkey May Solve Violence Over Park Construction

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:49 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Middle East
3:38 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Syrians React To U.S. Providing Military Aid To Rebels

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 5:05 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, BYLINE: And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The White House announced last night it will now give direct military aid to Syrian rebel forces. Administration officials say this follows intelligence assessments that indicate the regime of President Bashar al-Assad has used chemical weapons repeatedly against opposition forces in the past year. For more on what this means, we go to NPR's Deborah Amos who is in Amman, Jordan. Deb, welcome.

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Middle East
3:38 am
Fri June 14, 2013

U.S. To Provide Military Support To Opposition In Syria

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And I'm Linda Wertheimer. The Obama administration has shifted policy on Syria with an announcement, last night, that it will step up support for rebels who've been losing ground in recent weeks. The White House says it will start providing direct military support to rebel commanders.

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Politics
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Religious Conservatives Focus On Midterm Elections

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 1:50 pm

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

They're calling it the Road to Majority. It's the third annual meeting of conservative religious activists with the Faith and Freedom Coalition. The conference is underway now in Washington, D.C. Its stated aim: To boost the conservative vote for next year's midterm election.

As NPR's David Welna reports, it's also a platform for Republican stars eyeing the White House in 2016.

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Around the Nation
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Detroit's Emergency Manager Meets With Creditors

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:49 am

Kevyn Orr will ask unions, retirees and banks to take big losses on debt the city just can't afford to pay. But Orr is walking a fine line trying to convince those parties to accept a bankruptcy-style settlement, without actually going to bankruptcy court — at least, not yet.

Business
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Bidding War Breaks Out For 2 Boston Parking Spaces

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 5:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And that brings us to our last word in business, which is luxury pavement.

In Boston's Back Bay neighborhood, real estate is expensive, and space is tight.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And so it was that a bidding war broke out there yesterday. According to the Boston Globe, the price for the item in question started at $42,000.

MONTAGNE: And was bid up to a final price $560,000 - which got the winners two parking spots on crumbling asphalt in an alleyway.

Business
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Business News

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:59 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with a man, a plan, a canal.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

MONTAGNE: Not Panama this time. This canal is in Nicaragua. Yesterday, the Nicaraguan congress granted a Chinese tycoon the exclusive right to develop a multi-billion dollar rival to the Panama Canal. The bill grants the investor 50 years of control over the potential shipping route - pending a study of its viability. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Food
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

What's A Juniper Berry And How Do I Cook With It?

Chef Raghavan Iyer at work in Om, an Indian restaurant in Minneapolis, in 2009.
Craig Lassig AP

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:29 am

This is an installment of NPR's Cook Your Cupboard, an ongoing food series about working with what you have on hand. Have a food that has you stumped? Share a photo and we'll ask chefs about our favorites. The current submission category: Booze!

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Around the Nation
3:22 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Maine College Students Take On A Bear Of A Study

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 4:49 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

In Maine, the state's effort to keep tabs on its black bear population is getting some help from a group of college kids. The program has undergraduate students capturing bears, running tests on them, and attaching tracking devices before releasing them back into the wild.

Maine Public Radio's Jay Field went along on a recent expedition into the woods.

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Parallels
1:20 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Friction Among Afghans A Threat To Post-U.S. Mission

A soldier from the 4th Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, Manchus, looks toward the tree line through his rifle scope while on a foot patrol to visit Afghan Local Police in the Panjwai District of Kandahar province in southern Afghanistan. Panjwai is one of the most dangerous districts in Afghanistan.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Tue June 25, 2013 1:48 pm

The Afghan farmer in Panjwai District, outside the southern city of Kandahar, is finally fed up with the Taliban.

His name is Abdullah Razik. He's slight, with a trim beard and a dark green shirt that falls below his knees.

The Taliban plant roadside bombs in his fields, he says, and shoot near his house. The area is one of the most dangerous in Afghanistan — the birthplace of the Taliban.

Not long ago, something worse happened, Razik says.

"My friend ... lost his hand," he says. "The Taliban were putting IEDs in my village" four months ago.

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Planet Money
1:19 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Why More People Are Renting Tires

Originally published on Fri June 21, 2013 11:44 am

"Oh, I checked every place in town, and they were outrageous," says Shannon Kelly. "It would be anywhere from $4[00] to $500, and I just don't have that right now."

Kelly had just walked into Rent N Roll, a rent-to-own tire store in Ocala, Fla. She was looking to rent a set of tires for her truck. Tire rental stores like this one have been around for a while, but until recently, most of their customers rented fancy rims. These days, it's becoming more common for the stores to rent simple tires to people who don't have the cash to buy tires outright.

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Middle East
1:18 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Can Captain Sunshine Save The Israeli Electric Car Dream?

American-Israeli solar entrepreneur Yosef Abramowitz, aka Captain Sunshine, speaks during a rally of electric car owners in Israel.
Emily Harris/NPR

Originally published on Sun June 16, 2013 6:19 am

Captain Sunshine wears a yellow yarmulke, yellow T-shirt and a bright-yellow cape held around his shoulders with a silky red ribbon. At a recent rally of about 200 electric-car owners in Israel, he called out questions to the crowd.

"We're saying to the government and to the army," he shouted through a squawky mic, "20 percent of your fleets should be electric cars. Do you agree?"

The crowd cheered yes.

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Movie Interviews
12:45 am
Fri June 14, 2013

Zack Snyder, Making Superman Over For Our Era

Actor Henry Cavill and director Zack Snyder confer on a shot for an early sequence in Man of Steel. Cavill is the first British actor to wear Superman's iconic red and blue — though not the first to play a D.C. comics superhero.
Clay Enos Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:04 am

The quintessential American superhero — the one who forged the genre — returns to the multiplex this weekend: Superman. The latest big-screen iteration, called Man of Steel, explores the birth of the character (played as an adult by British actor Henry Cavill), delving into why he came to Earth, his inner conflicts growing up, and how he resolves them.

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StoryCorps
12:44 am
Fri June 14, 2013

A Second Chance For A Father And Foster Son

Adrian Hawkins (left) with his foster father, Horace Atwater Jr., at a visit to StoryCorps in Atlanta. Horace took in Adrian when he was 14 years old.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 8:50 am

In 2004, Horace Atwater Jr. took in Adrian Hawkins as a foster child. Adrian was a teenager at the time, "this little, skinny kid, about 14," Horace recalls. "You didn't really have any clothes. You had mismatched socks."

Adrian had lived a difficult life as a child. He lived in several group and foster homes before moving in with Horace. "I remember times being hungry, seeing drugs and all kinds of stuff," Adrian tells Horace at StoryCorps in Atlanta. "I mean, some things had to happen for me to be in foster care."

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Movie Reviews
10:05 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

'Bling Ring': When Fame-Obsessed Teens Go Rogue

The Bling Ring, stealing clothes, jewelry and cash from the likes of Lindsay Lohan." href="/post/bling-ring-when-fame-obsessed-teens-go-rogue" class="noexit lightbox">
Taissa Farmiga (left) and Israel Broussard are key players in the five-person posse (otherwise known as the "Hollywood Hills Burglar Bunch") targeting celebrity homes in The Bling Ring, stealing clothes, jewelry and cash from the likes of Lindsay Lohan.
EPK

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 9:43 am

What it came down to in the end were "the beautiful, gorgeous things."

That's how Marc (Israel Broussard) explains the Bling Ring, a gang of teens who, over a span of 10 months in 2008 and 2009, robbed a series of celebrity homes, including those of Paris Hilton, Lindsay Lohan and Orlando Bloom. Along the way, they accrued more than $3 million worth of jewelry, clothing and accessories — not to mention that inevitable tabloid-headline nickname.

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Middle East
5:37 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Chemical Weapons Use In Syria Crosses U.S. 'Red Line'

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. The Obama administration has now joined France and Britain in concluding that the Syrian government has used chemical weapons against its own people. That crosses a red line that President Obama has repeatedly warned would change the U.S. calculation in Syria.

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Parallels
5:29 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Where Things Stand In Syria – And Other Questions Answered

A man carries a boy badly wounded by the fighting between government forces and rebels on March 11, 2012. The U.N. says at least 93,000 people have been killed in the fighting.
Rodrigo Abd AP

The White House announced Thursday that Syrian President Bashar Assad had crossed a "red line" by using chemical weapons against the opposition. The announcement comes amid calls for greater U.S. engagement in the conflict. We take a look at what is happening in Syria and who the major players are.

Where Do Things Stand In Syria?

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The Two-Way
5:16 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Lost In 1968 Battle, Marine's Dog Tag Found Again

After a photo of Lanny Martinson's dog tag was placed on Facebook and elsewhere, Marines and veterans helped track him down. Martinson lost the tag in Vietnam in 1968.
Facebook

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 7:08 pm

Lanny Martinson was a 23-year-old Marine sergeant in Vietnam when he last held his dog tags. In the 45 years since, he thought they were gone forever, lost in the mad rush to save his life after he and other Marines walked into a minefield.

He'll soon be getting one of those dog tags back, after a network of people worked together to find the tag's owner. When they contacted him, Martinson was just at the point of filing papers to request new dog tags, all these years later.

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It's All Politics
4:59 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

5 Things To Know About America's Fastest-Growing Counties

A worker guides a crane in Watford City, N.D. Oil production has tripled in five years, leading to rapid growth in some of the state's counties.
Matthew Staver Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:16 pm

The U.S. Census Bureau released its list of the nation's 100 fastest-growing counties Thursday, and here's what we learned: They're mainly clustered in the South and West, and their rapid population gains are fueled by a wide variety of economic and cultural factors including the energy boom, military realignment, Hispanic immigration, student enrollment and changing retirement patterns.

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Business
4:35 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Unpaid No More: Interns Win Major Court Battle

Eric Glatt, a Georgetown Law student, poses on Wednesday, in Washington, D.C. Unpaid internships have long been a path of opportunity for students and recent grads. But a federal judge ruled this week that Fox Searchlight Pictures violated minimum wage and overtime laws by not paying interns who worked on production of the 2010 movie Black Swan. Glatt was one of the interns.
Alex Brandon AP

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:36 pm

A federal court in New York has ruled that a group of interns at Fox Searchlight Pictures should have been paid for their work on the movie Black Swan. The decision may have broad implications for students looking for their first job.

Eric Glatt filed the federal lawsuit against Fox. He says everyone always told him taking an unpaid internship was the way to get his foot in the door in the film industry.

At Fox, he worked as an unpaid accounting clerk, he says — filing, getting signatures, running checks and handling petty cash — but he was working for nothing.

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Middle East
3:46 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Death Toll In Syria Jumps To Nearly 93,000

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:35 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The United Nations announced today that the death toll in Syria has jumped to nearly 93,000. Since last July, more than 5,000 people have been killed every month. And the numbers in reality are likely even higher.

They're compiled for the U.N. by a nonprofit group in San Francisco called the Human Rights Data Analysis Group. Researchers go through a complicated process, scouring eight different sources that document deaths. Megan Price led that study, and she joins us now to talk about it. Welcome to the program.

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The Two-Way
3:34 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

4 Exchanges You Should Listen To About NSA Surveillance

FBI Director Robert Mueller is sworn in on on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Thursday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 9:12 pm

  • Mueller Responds To Nadler
  • Mueller Explains Importance Of Program
  • Mueller Explains Relation To Fourth Amendment
  • Mueller Responds To Collins

Today was round two on Capitol Hill.

After the Senate Appropriations Committee questioned the director of the National Security Agency, the House Judiciary Committee grilled FBI Director Robert Mueller.

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The Two-Way
3:34 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

U.S. Says It Has 'High Confidence' Syria Used Chemical Weapons

Syrian rebel fighters hold a position Thursday in the northwestern town of Maaret al-Numan. At least 93,000 people, including more than 6,500 children, have been killed in Syria's civil war.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 6:19 pm

The White House has "high confidence" that the Syrian regime is using chemical weapons against rebel forces, and the U.S. is prepared to offer military assistance to the opposition, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Deputy National Security Adviser Ben Rhodes said that an estimated 100 to 150 Syrians have been killed in attacks using sarin gas, although the figure "is likely incomplete."

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NPR's Backseat Book Club
3:32 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Meet 'Ivan': The Gorilla Who Lived In A Shopping Mall

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:00 pm

The school year is drawing to a close, but NPR's Backseat Book Club has plenty of reading lined up for the summer. Our June pick is The One and Only Ivan, a Newbery Medal-winning book by Katherine Applegate. It tells the story of a gorilla who spent 27 years in a shopping mall in Tacoma, Wash. — and it's based on a true story.

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The Salt
3:28 pm
Thu June 13, 2013

Saving Grandma's Strawberry Cake From The Clutches Of Jell-O

Jeremy Jackson wanted to rethink his grandma Mildred's famous Strawberry Cake recipe, which uses boxed cake mix and Jell-O. His updated cupcake version is shown on the right.
Jeremy Jackson for NPR

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 4:35 pm

Jeremy Jackson's grandma Mildred was famous for her strawberry cake. Legend has it that one of the families in her small Missouri town loved the dessert so much, they "commissioned" her to make it for them once a week.

Jackson is the author of Good Day for A Picnic: Simple Food that Travels Well. He shared two versions of his Strawberry Cake for All Things Considered's Found Recipes series.

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