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The Two-Way
10:53 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Baikonour, We Have A Problem. Russian Rocket Crashes And Burns

The spectacular crash.
YouTube.com

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:38 pm

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Parenting
10:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Avoiding The Post-Millennial Mid-Life Crisis

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 7:54 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice. Today, as we broadcast from the Aspen Ideas Festival in Aspen, Colorado we decided to talk about new ideas about how young people can make the most of their 20s.

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Afghanistan
10:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Afghan Woman Fights For Women's Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we'd like to bring you the story of one young woman for whom going to school was literally an act of courage. Shabana Basij-Rasikh was six when the Taliban took over in Afghanistan. They made it illegal for girls to go to school. As a result, for years, Shabana and her sister put their lives on the line to go to a secret school in Kabul. Her persistence and bravery eventually led her to Middlebury College, where she graduated magna cum laude in 2010.

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Education
10:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Hot Tips To Reinvent Education

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Coming up, we will hear the story of one young woman who literally put her life on the line to go to school. Shabana Basij-Rasikh will join us to talk about growing up under Taliban rule in Afghanistan and the work she's doing now to make sure other young Afghan women can get an education. That's in just a few minutes. But first, we are continuing our conversation with our education innovators.

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Education
10:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Educational Innovators Ask 'Why Can't Learning Be Fun?'

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Remembrances
10:28 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Remembering William Gray: A Mentor To Many

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, we want to take a minute to say goodbye to an important figure in American politics and education. Former Congressman William Gray III died yesterday at the age of 71. Gray was a Democrat who represented Pennsylvania's 2nd District from 1979 to 1992. He was the first African-American to serve as majority whip in the U.S. House of Representatives.

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Parallels
9:59 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Nelson Mandela's Prison Adventures

Near the end of his 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela was taken to secret meetings with government officials and for drives around Cape Town. Here, he returned to his Robben Island prison cell for a visit in 1994, shortly before he became South Africa's first black president.
Louise Gubb Corbis

Originally published on Thu December 5, 2013 5:15 pm

On Christmas Eve 1986, a South Africa prison commander responsible for watching over Nelson Mandela casually asked the world's most famous prisoner, "Mandela, would you like to see the city?"

Mandela was completely surprised, but agreed. The prison commander, Lt. Col. Gawie Marx, promptly put Mandela in his car for a leisurely drive around Cape Town, one of the world's most scenic cities.

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Movie Reviews
9:58 am
Tue July 2, 2013

A Familiar Wild West, But The Guy In The Mask? Who's He?

There's a backstory for just about everything in Gore Verbinski's The Lone Ranger, including what drives the title character (Armie Hammer) to don the mask — and what's up with that dead crow Tonto (Johnny Depp) wears on his head.
Peter Mountain Walt Disney Pictures

Originally published on Wed July 3, 2013 5:25 pm

There's never been anything very lone about the Lone Ranger. He's always been accompanied by Tonto, his Native American sidekick; Silver his snow-white steed; and the William Tell Overture.

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The Two-Way
9:51 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Jailed Tunisian Rapper Is Freed; Song Called Police 'Dogs'

Tunisian rapper Ala Yaacoubi, also known by his rap name Weld El 15, left, speaks alongside his lawyer, Ghazi Mrabet, before his trial last month.
Fethi Belaid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 1:29 pm

A Tunisian appeals court has freed rapper Ala Yaacoubi, who last month was sentenced to two years in prison for insulting police officers with his song "The Police Are Dogs."

Critics had said the arrest of Yaacoubi, 25, who performs under the name Weld El 15, was a sign of repression in Tunisia, where mass rallies overthrew former leader Zine El Abidine Ben Ali at the start of the Arab Spring in 2011. As NPR reported that summer, several rap songs became anthems for that shift.

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Monkey See
9:32 am
Tue July 2, 2013

'Big Brother' Isn't Just A Terrible Show, It's A Wasted Opportunity

Houseguest Judd makes a toast during the season premiere of Big Brother.
Cliff Lipson CBS

Here's how Big Brother works.

Producers throw a bunch of people into a house, where they're stuck for about three months. All day and all night, they're watched by cameras, and they can be watched online — these are the so-called "live feeds," which are sort of like watching the security cameras in the most boring juice bar in Los Angeles. (I wrote about touring the house in 2010; it's very creepy.)

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It's All Politics
9:17 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Democrats Face The Two States Of Texas: Urban And Rural

Texas is beginning to trend urban (downtown Houston, left), which could be good news for Democrats, who tend not to do well in rural areas like Wise County near Boyd (right).
David J. Phillip (left)/LM Otero (right) AP

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 12:32 pm

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Monkey See
7:02 am
Tue July 2, 2013

To The Dump, To The Dump, To The Dump Dump Dump: Write Us A Lone Ranger Joke

Milos Luzanin iStockphoto.com

This morning, as I perused the headlines, I saw a few items about the new Lone Ranger movie, and rather than being struck by interesting thoughts about the racial politics of Johnny Depp's Tonto, I abruptly remembered this joke: "Where does the Lone Ranger take his trash?" "To the dump, to the dump, to the dump dump dump." You know, because of the music?

And then I thought, "Who built the Lone Ranger's luxury apartment building?"

"Donald Trump, Donald Trump, Donald Trump Trump Trump."

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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Top Stories: Fallen Firefighters Honored; Heat Wave Continues

Oh, baby it's hot: The sun shines down on people standing atop the roof of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, one of the cities in the grips of a dangerous heat wave.
Jonathan Alcorn Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:44 am

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Books
6:42 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Chronicle of 'Gettysburg' Refuses Easy Answers

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:50 pm

For historians, and for much more casual students of the Civil War, the battle of Gettysburg 150 years ago holds seemingly limitless fascination — a search for "Gettysburg" on Amazon turns up over 7,500 books — and similarly limitless opportunity for debate. Did the Confederacy's iconic commander, Gen. Robert E. Lee, bring defeat to his own army by reaching too far in ordering Pickett's fateful — and disastrous — charge? Did Gen.

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The Two-Way
6:07 am
Tue July 2, 2013

VIDEOS: Solemn Salutes To Fallen Firefighters In Arizona

Holding on to each other: Firefighters hug during a memorial service Monday in Prescott, Ariz. They were honoring 19 others who died Sunday.
Michael Nelson EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:43 am

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A Blog Supreme
6:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Facing Illness, An Improviser Learns The Art Of Patience

Dayna Stephens.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:07 am

Dayna Stephens is a patient musician. The 34-year-old tenor saxophonist and composer fashions supple, searching improvisations that brim with melodic cogency. His compositions often exude a widescreen sensibility with languid, narrative-like passages, suspenseful interludes and sumptuous harmonies.

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The Two-Way
5:34 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Pressure Builds On Egypt's Morsi To Compromise Or Step Down

Hundreds of thousands of demonstrators gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square again Monday during a protest calling for the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi.
Mohamed El-Shahed AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 7:37 am

With about 24 hours to go before the deadline set by Egypt's military to work with opponents and craft a roadmap that moves the country past its political problems or have one created for him by the army, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi is under intense pressure. He must either "reach some kind of compromise" with those protesting against his government "or step aside," NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson tells our Newscast Desk.

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Around the Nation
5:20 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Sign Maker Misspells Florida, Twice

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene. Florida's Department of Transportation ordered a new sign for Interstate 95. It read: Exit 344, University of Florida, Florida State College South Campus. Only one issue. Both times, Florida was spelled wrong. It read: Flordia. The sign manufacturer in Arkansas made that mistake. According to First Coast News, the company has agreed to fix the sign for free. They also might want to get off at that exit and head back to school.

Europe
5:17 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Imagine 'Star Wars' Taking Place In Elizabethan England

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne.

Imagine if "Star Wars" took place not in a galaxy far, far away, but in Elizabethan England. Darth Vader and Obi-Wan Kenobi's final exchange might sound like...

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In time, thy powers have weak become, old man.

MONTAGNE: And yes, thou canst not win all warrant, Darth.

Out today, "William Shakespeare's Star Wars," as told by the Bard. And author Ian Doescher aims for a sequel: "The Empire Striketh Back."

The Two-Way
5:10 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Book News: Neil Gaiman Revives 'Sandman' Comic Series

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:13 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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First Reads
5:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Exclusive First Read: 'Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish'

David Rakoff, seen here in 2010, worked on Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish for a decade, finishing shortly before his death in 2012.
Larry Busacca Getty Images for Tribeca Film Festival

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 8:03 am

  • Listen to the Excerpt

David Rakoff was a mainstay on public radio's This American Life, and the best-selling author of Fraud, Don't Get Too Comfortable, and Half Empty. He died of cancer in 2012 at the age of 47, shortly after finishing Love, Dishonor, Marry, Die, Cherish, Perish, a short novel in verse that jumps from decade to decade, tracking a panoply of American characters across the 20th century: 1920s slaughterhouse workers, 1950s office girls, AIDS victims and '80s yuppies.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Tue July 2, 2013

You'll Want To Hang Up On These 'Secret Conversations'

Originally published on Sat July 20, 2013 3:34 pm

A country girl from Grabtown, N.C., Ava Gardner arrived in Hollywood in 1941 knowing she couldn't act but, gorgeous as she was, she never had to let that slow her down. Her beauty — which reportedly intimidated Elizabeth Taylor — won her not just film roles and studio-paid acting lessons, but the attentions of all-American boy Mickey Rooney, whom she married and divorced before she turned 21. She had a similarly brief union with bandleader Artie Shaw — she called those two her "starter husbands" — before a tempestuous, headline-making marriage to Frank Sinatra.

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The Two-Way
5:00 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Snowden Seeks Asylum In 20-Plus Nations, Gives Up On Russia

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:54 am

With help from a WikiLeaks lawyer, the young American who admits he leaked information about National Security Agency surveillance programs has now asked more than 20 nations to give him asylum.

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Parallels
4:51 am
Tue July 2, 2013

New Kind Of Ikea Hack: Flat-Packs Head To Refugee Camps

Check out the video at the bottom of the page to see how this box transforms ...
Ikea Foundation

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 9:20 am

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National Security
3:24 am
Tue July 2, 2013

NSA Leaker Edward Snowden Expands Asylum Request

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The saga of Edward Snowden feels like a page-turner, the story of an international fugitive no one wants. Snowden is the former NSA contractor trying to avoid prosecution in the U.S. for leaking classified documents.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Snowden has been weighing his options as he languishes in a Moscow airport. He's requested asylum in at least 20 countries now. According to the website WikiLeaks, Snowden's legal advisor submitted those requests by hand to diplomatic missions in Moscow.

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Middle East
3:22 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Egypt's Army Gives Morsi Deadline To Allay Opposition

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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Europe
3:17 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Trade Talks Threatened By Allegations U.S. Spied On E.U.

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Europe is in an uproar over revelations that U.S. intelligence services are spying on the European Union mission in New York and its embassy in Washington. The new allegations come from the latest secret U.S. National Security Agency documents leaked by Edward Snowden.

Economy
3:15 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Economic Squeeze Plays Out On Egyptian Streets

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

David Greene talks to Farah Halime, a Cairo-based financial journalist who writes about Egypt's economy. Whether President Morsi caves to protesters' demands to step down, whoever ends up running the country will have to deal with a terribly deteriorating economy. Halime's blog is called the RebelEconomy.com.

Economy
3:10 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Portugal's Budget Austerity May Do More Harm Than Good

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I always wondered where some of those stock market symbols came from.

To Europe now. Portugal's finance minister - the architect of the country's economic bailout deal with the European Union - has resigned. In stepping down, he cited the backlash against the policies he imposed at the urging of European lenders.

NPR's Lauren Frayer reports on this latest turn in the debate over whether severe budget austerity does more harm than good.

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Politics
2:45 am
Tue July 2, 2013

Texas Democrats See Opportunity In Changing Demographics

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 6:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

All week, we are looking at demographic changes in the currently very red, very Republican Lone Star state. Democrats hope the growing size and potential voting clout of the Latin population will turn Texas blue.

Whether that happens or not, the Texas Democratic Party already bears little resemblance to what it looked like when it last dominated Texas politics decades ago.

NPR's Don Gonyea brings us the latest in our series Texas 2020.

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