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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Elevator Pitch: Why Care About Washington?

wbeem via Flickr

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 9:24 am

­­My friend Mark Leibovich — a New York Times reporter — has written a book about the inner watchworkings of Power Washington called This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral-Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking!-in America's Gilded Capital. Among the incestuous cognoscenti of the Capital City, This Town has more buzz than a top-bar beehive.

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The Two-Way
8:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Hey, It's Not A Burglar, It's A 19-Foot Python

Employees hold a huge python caught in an Australian charity store. Police initially thought a burglar had fallen through the roof and made a mess.
Queensland Police AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 9:57 am

Imagine this: A 19-foot python falls out of the ceiling of a store and leaves a big hole, knocks over sale objects and then makes a nasty mess on the floor before hiding in plain sight along a wall. And nobody finds it for a day.

Police in Queensland, Australia, were called to a charity store in the tiny town of Ingham this week to investigate what they initially suspected was a break-in by someone with stomach flu.

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The Two-Way
8:29 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Apple Conspired To Set E-Book Prices, Judge Rules

A federal judge ruled Wednesday that Apple conspired with publishers to fix e-book prices.
Manu Fernandez AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:19 pm

Apple Inc. "conspired to raise the retail price of e-books," a federal judge ruled Wednesday as a civil lawsuit brought by the Justice Department reached its conclusion.

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Shots - Health News
8:13 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Catholics Split Again On Coverage For Birth Control

Baltimore Archbishop William Lori gave voice to a letter Catholic groups sent to the administration and Congress to protest insurance rules for contraceptives.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 12:42 pm

  • As Heard On Morning Edition

Two prominent Catholic groups are finding themselves, once again, on opposite sides of a key issue regarding the Affordable Care Act.

Three years ago, the Catholic Health Association, whose members run hospitals and nursing homes across the country, backed passage of the health law. The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, which represents the hierarchy of the church, opposed it.

Now the groups are divided over the law's requirement for most employer-based health insurance plans to provide women with birth control.

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The Two-Way
7:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Foul Play, Negligence Not Ruled Out In Quebec Train Disaster

Do not cross: Crime scene tape blocks access to part of Lac-Mégantic, Quebec, where a train derailed and exploded on Saturday.
Stephen Morrison EPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 4:19 am

Quebec police are looking into whether Saturday's train derailment and the massive explosions that followed in the small town of Lac-Megantic were caused by "foul play or criminal negligence," CBC News reported Wednesday morning.

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Shots - Health News
7:11 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Tax Break Can Help With Health Coverage, But There's A Catch

Tax credits may help make health insurance more affordable, but can bite back if your income goes up more than expected.
iStockphoto.com

There are two kinds of financial help for people planning to enroll in the online health insurance marketplaces that will open this fall. One could put people at risk of having to pay some of the money back, while the other won't.

That's one big difference between tax credits and subsidies, both of which are intended to help people with lower incomes pay for health insurance through the new health care law.

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The Two-Way
7:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Royals In Nappies: A Family Album

Little Princess Elizabeth takes a ride on the grounds of Windsor Castle in 1927 with her cousin, Gerald Lascelles.
AP

The photographers are already setting up ahead of the expected birth this month of the little prince or princess who will be Britain's third in line to the throne.

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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Wed July 10, 2013

VIDEO: Rare Clip Shows Roosevelt's Use Of Wheelchair

Photos of President Franklin D. Roosevelt sitting in a wheelchair are also rare and weren't shown to the public while he was in office. In this image from 1941 he's with his dog Fala and Ruthie Bie, the granddaughter of a gardener who worked for the Roosevelt family.
Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 8:26 am

The press and the president's aides kept Franklin D. Roosevelt's use of a wheelchair hidden from most of the public during his more than 12 years as the nation's leader.

So hidden, in fact, that an Indiana college professor's discovery of just 8 seconds of film that shows Roosevelt gliding down a ramp aboard the U.S.S. Baltimore in July 1944 is making news this week.

According to The Associated Press:

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All Tech Considered
6:22 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Utah Internet Firm Defies State's Warrantless Subpoena Law

Pete Ashdown is founder and CEO of XMission, Utah's oldest Internet service provider.
Flickr via Center for Study of Ethics at UVU

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:51 am

Utah's oldest Internet service provider, XMission, has refused to give up customer information to law enforcement, reports The Salt Lake Tribune. Specifically, the company says it won't comply with administrative subpoenas.

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All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

First Watch: John Vanderslice, 'How The West Was Won'

John Vanderslice
Courtesy of the artist

"This is just an awesome, inspiring place to make music." Those are the words of Jake Wachtel, who directed this music video for John Vanderslice. And the place he's talking about, well, it's John's heart and soul really: It's a recording studio called Tiny Telephone located in San Francisco's Mission District.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Reports: Egypt Orders Arrest Of Muslim Brotherhood Leader

Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie in Cairo last December.
EPA/Landov

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:57 am

Prosecutors in Egypt have ordered that Muslim Brotherhood leader Mohammed Badie be arrested, according to Egyptian state television and other news outlets.

NPR's Leila Fadel adds from Cairo that she's been told about the order by an Egyptian security official with knowledge of what's happening.

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The Two-Way
5:47 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Book News: 'Ender's Game' Author Responds To Boycott Threats

Orson Scott Card poses at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, in 2008.
Wikimedia Commons/ Nihonjoe

Originally published on Thu July 11, 2013 5:08 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
5:47 am
Wed July 10, 2013

No Smoking Signs Are Usually Pretty Simple

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:42 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Direct TV To Offer New Channel: Dog TV

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. Starting next month, Direct TV will offer a new channel - Dog TV, 24 hour programming designed just for your pooch. The aim is to entertain dogs while they're home alone, and help them deal with challenging situations. The viewers will be exposed, in small doses, to stressful sounds, like doorbells and vacuum cleaners.

Around the Nation
5:40 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Minor League Baseball Team Loses An Important Member

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne.

A Minor League baseball team in New Jersey lost an important member this week. Chase the golden retriever entertained fans of the Trenton Thunder for most of his 13 years. He carried bats from the batters' cage to the dugout, and baskets of water bottles to the umpires. Chase was so renowned, he was honored last month at Yankee Stadium, and the Thunder threw him a retirement party last week. Chase died Monday. His son Derby will now take his place.

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Rhetoric Drowns Out The Thrills In Huston's 'Skinner'

iStockphoto.com

Charlie Huston's 2010 novel, Sleepless, bowled me over. What a powerful combination of combustible plot and fiery language! At the center of that book, an insomnia plague spreads across Southern California (and the rest of the country). The illness keeps you awake all night, quite fuzzy-minded during the day, and then after a couple of months it kills you. The only thing approaching an antidote is a drug called Dreamer, which makes a little sleep possible before you die.

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The Two-Way
4:54 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Boston Bombings Suspect To Appear In Survivor-Packed Court

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:35 am

When the young man who stands accused in the Boston Marathon bombings makes his first court appearance Wednesday afternoon, survivors of the explosions that killed three people and wounded more than 260 are expected to be in the room, The Associated Press reports. So are relatives of those killed and wounded.

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The Two-Way
3:41 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Investors Brace For News Out Of Fed Minutes

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke during a news conference in June. Financial markets reacted to comments he made then by selling off bonds and stocks.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 7:13 am

After the Federal Open Market Committee meeting last month, the financial markets "freaked out," according to David Wessel, economics editor of The Wall Street Journal.

Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke's remarks at the time sent a shockwave through the markets when he suggested the Fed's stimulus could end.

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Politics
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Chaos Abroad Challenges America's Power

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning.

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Business
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Twinkies To Return to Store Shelves On Monday

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And today's last word in business is one of our favorite subjects: Twinkie resurrection.

The yellow spongy cakes will be back on store shelves this Monday. There had been a run on Twinkies following the bankruptcy of Hostess, Twinkies' parent company.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Animals
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Virus Targets Baby Pigs

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And the agriculture industry is dealing with a new worry: a virus that is spreading through farms. It has killed hundreds of thousands of baby pigs.

Frank Morris from member station KCUR has more.

FRANK MORRIS, BYLINE: Like most hog farmers, Brent Sandidge in Missouri has been losing money lately.

BRENT SANDIDGE: We've had a drought, and record high feed prices, so that would be the last thing you'd need, another hit.

MORRIS: But that hit came this spring for some with the Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus.

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Business
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

China Issues Grim Trade Outlook

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news begins with China's grim trade outlook.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: Numbers from the month of June offered more evidence that the world's second-biggest economy might be losing steam. Exports from China fell by more than 3 percent from a year earlier. Imports were down, as well, by almost a percent.

Asia
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Bangladesh Collapse: The Garment Workers Who Survived

Rebecca Khatun, a worker at Rana Plaza, lies in a hospital bed. She lost her left leg and right foot in the collapse, which also killed five members of her family. Khatun received $120 and free medical care for her loss --€” compensation she says won't be enough for what she's been through.
Julie McCarthy NPR

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:57 pm

(We updated this post at 11:58 a.m. ET to include a statement released Wednesday by Walmart. Click here to see that)

It's been 2 1/2 months since the Rana Plaza collapsed on garment workers in Bangladesh, exposing abysmal safety conditions in the country's factories.

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Shots - Health News
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

How Oregon Is Getting 'Frequent Fliers' Out Of The ER

Jeremie Seals used to go to the hospital emergency room to avoid sleeping in his car.
Kristian Foden-Vencil OPB

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Forty-year-old Jeremie Seals has had a tough life.

He left home at 14, and his health isn't good. He had a heart attack when he was 35. He has congestive heart failure, and nerve pain in his legs that he says is "real bad."

"Long story short, I'm terminal," he says, matter-of-factly.

Seals is unwilling to divulge too much about his past. But over the years, he says his health has deteriorated to such a degree that he can no longer hold a job.

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NPR Story
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

L.A. Embraces Dodger Rookie Yasiel Puig

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In baseball, the summer of Yasiel Puig goes on. The breakout star for the Los Angeles Dodgers is a mere five weeks into his major league career. And in that short time he is set hitting records and also helping turn around a struggling Dodgers team. Puig is a 22-year-old Cuban defector. His past remains a bit of a mystery, but that doesn't seem to bother the fans caught up in Puig-mania.

Here's NPR's Tom Goldman.

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NPR Story
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Egypt's Economic Health Needs Outside Help

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 1:21 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Egypt's political future will largely depend on its economy, and its economic future will largely depend on help from other countries. To talk more about this, we reached Mohsin Khan. He's a senior fellow at the Rafik Hariri Center on the Middle East at the Atlantic Council. He's also the former Director of the Middle East Department at the International Monetary Fund. Good morning.

MOHSIN KHAN: Good morning.

MONTAGNE: What are Egypt's most immediate economic needs?

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NPR Story
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Egyptian Military Pushes Ahead With New Constitution Plans

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:13 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. In Egypt, the interim president and the generals who brought him to power are pushing ahead with what they say is a plan for a new constitution and elections. This is supposed to be a transition to some kind of real civilian rule. But it's already raising a lot of doubts about the intentions of the military. We've reached NPR's Leila Fadel in Cairo for the latest. Leila, good morning.

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Afghanistan
2:32 am
Wed July 10, 2013

U.S. Troop Issue Complicates Diplomacy With Afghanistan

Originally published on Wed July 10, 2013 6:03 am

President Obama is considering pulling all U.S. troops out of Afghanistan by the end of next year, but the White House says no decision is imminent. Administration officials say the U.S. and Afghanistan are still talking about whether the U.S. will keep some residual force in Afghanistan after 2014.

Around the Nation
1:02 am
Wed July 10, 2013

Banjo Billy's Bus Tour: History, Mystery And Bad Jokes

The Banjo Billy bus tour starts and ends outside the Hotel Boulderado, at the corner of 13th and Spruce streets. Banjo shares some haunting tales from previous (and possibly still-current) guests, particularly those on the third floor and inside the still-functioning Otis elevator.
Courtesy of Vince Darcangelo

Originally published on Fri July 19, 2013 9:40 am

The rambling, funky ride called Banjo Billy's Bus Tours, in Boulder, Colo., is equal parts history, crime stories and comedy. It's all woven together by John Georgis — better known as Banjo Billy — in a playful, "choose your own adventure" style.

"You can either choose a PG tour, or a PG-13 tour, or an R-rated tour," he tells one group of riders. The crowd chooses the R-rated version, but they have to work for it.

"If you want the R-rated tour, you gotta say it like a pirate," Banjo says, drawing a bunch of "arrrrghs" from tour-goers. "R it is!"

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