NPR News

Pages

Music Interviews
1:18 am
Mon October 14, 2013

The Dismemberment Plan Returns, To Its Own Surprise

The Dismemberment Plan's new album, Uncanney Valley, is out Oct. 15.
Shervin Lainez Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 5:38 am

Read more
Asia
11:41 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Death Toll In India Temple Stampede Rises

A stampede on a bridge outside a Hindu temple in India killed more than 100 people on Sunday. Many of the victims leapt to their deaths in the water below.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon October 14, 2013 12:16 am

The death toll from a stampede near a temple in central India rose to 109 after many of the injured succumbed, an official said Monday.

Thousands of Hindu pilgrims were crossing a bridge leading to a temple in Madhya Pradesh state on Sunday when they panicked at rumors the bridge would collapse, triggering a stampede.

The district medical officer R.S. Gupta said that autopsies had been carried out on 109 bodies by late Sunday.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:43 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Israel Discovers Tunnel Leading To Gaza, Army Says

A view of a tunnel reportedly dug by Palestinians beneath the border between the Gaza Strip and Israel and recently uncovered by Israeli troops, on Sunday.
David Buimovitch AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:29 am

Israeli military officials announced Sunday that they have discovered an underground tunnel that leads from the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip into Israel. They say the tunnel could have been used for an attack against Israelis.

Read more
Movie Interviews
4:12 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Alan Rickman On 'CBGB' And The Importance Of Listening

Alan Rickman tells NPR's Arun Rath he wasn't familiar with CBGB or the punk scene until he began working on the film.
Beau Giann XLrator Media

After several failed musical ventures and two bankruptcies, New Yorker Hilly Kristal decided to try something new. In 1973, he opened a bar in Lower Manhattan intended to showcase sounds not so indigenous to the urban landscape: country, bluegrass and blues. And so came the name for the dive bar CBGB.

Read more
Animals
3:53 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Birds Of A Feather Spy Together

AFP/ Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:12 pm

The scene: Two men in a chilly Soviet apartment converse in whispers, careful to protect their plans from enemy ears. Little do they know, the benign-looking raven outside their window is not merely a city scavenger hunting for food, but a spy for the U.S. government.

Read more
Business
3:53 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

15 Years Later, Where Did All The Cigarette Money Go?

So far, the tobacco industry has paid more than $100 billion to state governments as part of a settlement. While smoking is down among young people and even adults in some areas, it's still unclear where much of that money has gone.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 10:12 am

Fifteen years after tobacco companies agreed to pay billions of dollars in fines in what is still the largest civil litigation settlement in U.S. history, it's unclear how state governments are using much of that money.

So far tobacco companies have paid more than $100 billion to state governments as part of the 25-year, $246 billion settlement.

Read more
Business
3:19 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Shortage Of Workers Hampers Chili Harvest In New Mexico

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Let's talk chili peppers. It's harvest time in New Mexico where the iconic crop has been grown for centuries. New Mexico still produces more chili peppers than any other American state. But production in the U.S. is a fraction of what's produced in India and China, countries with large pools of labor.

NPR's Ted Robbins reports that farmers in New Mexico could increase their harvest if they had the people to do it.

Read more
Music Interviews
3:19 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

A Comedy Woodstock, Courtesy Of Tenacious D

Jack Black and Kyle Gass of Tenacious D mug as 1960s hippies in a promo clip for Festival Supreme, a Los Angeles-based alternative comedy festival of their own creation.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 8:08 am

Woodstock didn't just bring together some of the most important musical acts of the late 1960s: It showed that a music festival could be a truly historic event.

These days, leave any pasture open long enough and someone will start setting up amps and concession stands. The outdoor music festival is ubiquitous in 2013. But so far, there has been no Woodstock for comedy.

Read more
Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Not In My Backyard: Hollywood Sign's Neighbors Fed Up With Tourists

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

If you've ever been to Los Angeles, no doubt you've sent a selfie with a Hollywood sign in the background. If that is you, you're not alone. The iconic sign is one of the city's biggest tourist attractions. Over the last few years, social media and GPS have only multiplied the number of visitors. Now, homeowners in the area say that's wreaking havoc in their neighborhood. NPR's Sam Sanders reports.

Read more
Europe
3:19 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Russia Sees Staggering Income Inequality

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:12 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

The Occupy Wall Street movement called attention to the huge gap between the rich and poor in America. But when it comes to wealth inequality, the U.S. has nothing on Russia where 35 percent of the entire country's wealth is owned by just 110 people. How on earth did a country go from communism to oligarchy so fast?

Read more
The Two-Way
3:05 pm
Sun October 13, 2013

Sequester Emerges Anew In Senate Shutdown Debate

Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), left, seen here speaking with Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY) in an elevator Sunday, says that undoing the sequester cuts is "one of the sticking points" in budget talks. Congress is struggling to find a solution to end the government shutdown, now in its thirteenth day.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 4:15 pm

The federal government shutdown is in its 13th day, with little sign of a budget deal that could win the approval of both houses of Congress, as well as the White House. The debate now includes efforts to avoid a default if the government's debt limit isn't raised by Thursday.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:48 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Seven Red Cross Relief Workers Seized In Syria

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:32 pm

The International Committee of the Red Cross says seven of its workers have been abducted in northwest Syria. The team, which includes one Syrian Red Crescent volunteer, was taken by gunmen as they drove to Damascus on Sunday morning.

The workers were seized in Idlib province, where rebels have clashed with government forces this month.

"We call for their immediate release," the relief agency said.

The AP reports:

Read more
The Two-Way
11:28 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Barriers Breached At World War II Memorial On Mall

A crowd gathers at the World War II Memorial to call for reopening national memorials closed by the government shutdown. The rally drew support from military veterans, Tea Party activists and Republicans.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:52 pm

A crowd of demonstrators converged on the World War II Memorial on the National Mall on Sunday morning, protesting the government shutdown that has included blocking full access to monuments in Washington.

The "Million Vet March," protest was organized by groups including the Brats for Veterans Advocacy, which called on military veterans and others to march against the barricading of the memorial, which its website calls "a despicable act of cowardice."

Read more
The Two-Way
9:32 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Cyclone Phailin Leaves Debris And Relatively Few Casualties

An Indian woman returns to the cyclone-hit Arjipalli village on the Bay of Bengal coast in Ganjam district, Orissa state, India, Sunday. Officials say 17 deaths resulted from the powerful storm that left a trail of destroyed houses.
Biswaranjan Rout AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:40 pm

Indian officials are reporting far fewer casualties than had been feared when the large and powerful cyclone Phailin struck the country's east coast Saturday. But the storm, which forced the evacuation of nearly 1 million people, has left flooding and destruction in its path.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:09 am
Sun October 13, 2013

U.S. Olympic Committee Adds Sexual Orientation To Anti-Discrimination Rules

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:29 pm

Months ahead of the Winter Olympics in Russia, where controversy surrounds a law that targets homosexuality, the U.S. Olympic Committee adds protection against discrimination based on sexual orientation to its policies.

"The fact that we do not think it is our role to advocate for a change in the Russian law does not mean that we support the law, and we do not," USOC CEO Scott Blackmun said.

Read more
Planet Money
7:56 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Models, Rules And High School Dropouts: A Guide To The Economics Nobel

The Nobel Foundation

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:27 pm

While a few gamblers bet real money on potential Nobel Prize winners, at Planet Money we're content to merely speculate. We're particularly interested in who might win the economics prize, which will be announced Monday morning.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:48 am
Sun October 13, 2013

U.S. Reaches Partial Deal To Keep Troops In Afghanistan

Secretary of State John Kerry describes a new partial bilateral security agreement with Afghanistan, in a news conference held Saturday after hours of discussions with Afghan President Hamid Karzai, right.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Two days of talks between U.S. and Afghan officials have yielded a partial security agreement between the two countries. Secretary of State John Kerry and President Hamid Karzai held discussions Friday and Saturday on a deal to keep the U.S. military in the country beyond the 2014 pullout date for most U.S. and NATO troops.

The next step for the tentative bilateral security agreement is for it to be reviewed by Afghanistan's parliament and the Loya Jirga, an assembly of public and tribal leaders.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:47 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Stampede On Indian Temple Bridge Kills Dozens

Indian villagers on tractors move past victims of a stampede on a bridge across the Sindh River in Madhya Pradesh state, India, on Sunday. Dozens of people died after a panic broke out.
AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:27 pm

At least 89 people reportedly died in a stampede Sunday at a temple in central India, where 25,000 people had crowded onto a bridge. Police believe a rumor that the bridge was collapsing sparked panic and confusion, according to local media.

Update at 12:15 p.m. ET: More Deaths Reported

Read more
Sunday Puzzle
6:21 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Can You Pass This -TE ST-?

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

On-air challenge: Today's puzzle is an insider's test. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the consecutive letters T-E-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end with -TE and the second word will start ST-. For example, given "sheer force," you would say "brute strength."

Read more
Author Interviews
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Turow Explores Mystical Connections In 'Identical'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Scott Turow says some recent research in a case with DNA evidence inspired the plot of his new thriller, Identical. He tells host Rachel Martin about his interest in twins.

The Salt
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

With Each Sip Of Whisky, You're Taking A Gulp Of Atmosphere

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 2:48 pm

You know the saying about drinking early in the day: "It's 5 o'clock somewhere in the world."

Well, it turns out that the "somewhere" actually can make a difference when it comes to drinking.

Scientists at Oxford University have found that whisky has a different taste depending on where it's sipped.

Read more
Politics
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senators Hunt For Budget Agreement

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Deal or no deal? That's the question in American politics right now as the shutdown drags on and the debt ceiling looms. Host Rachel Martin talks with NPR's political correspondent Mara Liasson.

Politics
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

How To Be A 'Super Forecaster'

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Experts and pundits' predictions of the future aren't particularly accurate, according to University of Pennsylvania professor Philip Tetlock. He tells host Rachel Martin that making accurate predictions might be a trainable skill.

Asia
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Cyclone Ravages India's East Coast

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

A massive evacuation effort appears to have saved many lives, but Cylcone Phailin flooded villages and destroyed homes. Financial Times South Asia bureau chief Victor Mallet speaks with host Rachel Martin about the extent of the damage.

Afghanistan
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Kerry, Afghans Reach Deal On Troop Withdrawal

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

In marathon talks in Kabul, Secretary of State John Kerry persuaded the reluctant Afghan president to agree to a deal on the planned withdrawal of American troops next year. While some questions about the agreement remain unresolved, it marks a diplomatic victory for Kerry. Now it is up to Karzai to sell it to his people.

Africa
5:49 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Why Libyan Prime Minister Was Kidnapped, Then Freed

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Ali Zeidan was abducted and then released last week after the U.S. raided Tripoli to capture a senior al-Qaida suspect. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with professor Dirk Vandewalle, author of A History of Modern Libya, about Zeidan's many opponents and the role of militias in Libya.

Parallels
5:11 am
Sun October 13, 2013

A Decade On, A Boy, A Ball And A West Bank Wall

A decade ago, Israel's separation barrier cut off Ishaq Amer's home from its Palestinian village.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:29 am

A little more than a decade ago, in an effort to improve security, Israel began building a physical barrier in and around the West Bank.

The Amer family is among the Palestinians whose lives were disrupted. The concrete wall and fence cut them off from their village. Their son was separated from his soccer buddies, the most important thing in the world to him at the time.

Read more
You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun October 13, 2013

'Mezzanine' Takes The Trappings Of Everyday Life To The Next Level

iStockphoto.com

Okay, I admit it. I was going to tell you to read Proust. The thing is, a whole industry already exists around urging you to read Proust, and as well-meaning as those literary evangelists might be, they only end up making you feel unworthy, illiterate and/or lazy.

Read more
It's All Politics
3:41 am
Sun October 13, 2013

Senate Gets A Dose Of Scolding With Its Morning Prayer

Senate Chaplain Barry C. Black has been using his morning prayer to express his displeasure with political gridlock.
Drew Angerer AP

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 1:21 pm

It's easy to tune out when the Senate goes through its morning rituals. The president pro tem calls the chamber to order; there's the Pledge of Allegiance. One morning could sound like any other.

Except for the past two weeks. Barry C. Black, the Senate chaplain, has been using his morning prayers to say exactly what he thinks is wrong with Washington lawmakers: "Remove from them that stubborn pride, which imagines itself to be above and beyond criticism."

Read more
The Salt
3:38 am
Sun October 13, 2013

(Cabbage) Heads Will Roll: How To Make A Food Network 'From Scratch'

According to journalist Allen Salkin, Emeril Lagasse initially opposed bringing Rachael Ray, pictured here in 2007, onto the Food Network – and, at first, Ray agreed with him. "You have this all wrong," she told executives, "I'm beer in a bottle; you guys are champagne."
Scott Gries Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 13, 2013 6:47 am

Mario Batali, Guy Fieri and Rachael Ray are just a few of the stars the Food Network helped create. But what the network gave, it could also take away.

In From Scratch, author Allen Salkin takes an unsparing look at the network's progression from struggling cable startup to global powerhouse, and the people — Emeril Lagasse, Paula Deen — who rose and fell along the way.

Salkin tells NPR's Rachel Martin that while the network was intended for cooks, it wasn't run by them.

Read more

Pages