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The Two-Way
1:49 pm
Sun September 29, 2013

In Kenya, Questions Arise Over Reported Warnings Of Attack

The upper parking lot entrance to the Westgate Mall is seen above vehicles that plunged during the collapse of the upper level. Kenyan officials are urging patience with the pace of the flow of information about the attack.
Ben Curtis AP

Kenyan authorities say they've made another arrest in the deadly attack on an upscale mall that shocked Nairobi last week. But officials are also facing questions over reports of intelligence that may have given warnings about the attack, which ended with at least 67 deaths.

According to the Kenyan Red Cross's last update which came on Friday, 59 people who are believed to have been in the mall remain unaccounted for.

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The Two-Way
11:37 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The $142,000 Pickup: Truck With 1.3 Miles Tops Vintage Car Auction

This 1958 Chevrolet Cameo pickup truck with 1.3 miles and a three-speed transmission sold for $140,000 at Saturday's auction of vehicles stockpiled for decades by car dealership owner Ray Lambrecht.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 3:00 pm

A car auction unlike any other is going on this weekend in Pierce, Neb., where hundreds of cars that were stockpiled by a Chevrolet dealer are finally being sold — many for the first time. The Lambrecht Chevrolet collection stretches back to the 1950s and has drawn bids and interest from around the world.

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The Two-Way
9:43 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Militants Kill Students In Dorms At Nigerian College

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 10:28 am

As many as 50 students may be dead in Nigeria, after gunmen attacked an agricultural college's dormitories in the country's northeast. The attack, which occurred as many students slept, is being blamed on the group Boko Haram, which wants to form an Islamic state.

From The Associated Press:

"As many as 50 students may have been killed in the assault that began at about 1 a.m. Sunday in rural Gujba, Provost Molima Idi Mato of Yobe State College of Agriculture, told The Associated Press."

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The Two-Way
8:55 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Remarks On Women's Ovaries Expose Saudi Cleric To Ridicule

A file image taken from a video released by Change.org shows a woman driving a car as part of a 2011 campaign to defy Saudi Arabia's ban on women driving.
AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 10:24 am

A Saudi cleric who warned women against driving cars by saying it could harm their ovaries is facing criticism and mockery. The comments of Sheikh Saleh al-Luhaydan came a month before a planned day of disobedience, with activists encouraging women to drive — a right they do not have in Saudi Arabia.

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The Two-Way
7:53 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Market Bombing In Peshawar Leaves Dozens Dead

Pakistani rescue workers, police officers and civilians look for people who were wounded and killed at the site of a car bomb explosion in Peshawar, Pakistan, Sunday.
Mohammad Sajjad AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 10:12 am

A powerful explosion has killed at least 37 people in Peshawar, Pakistan, where authorities say they suspect a car bomb was detonated in a market district near a police station. The explosion left a scene of devastation, with casualties and severe damage to nearby buildings in the city's historic Qissa Khawani market.

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The Two-Way
6:52 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Shutdown Standoff: 'How Dare You,' And Other Views From Congress

The federal government remains on track to miss a midnight Monday deadline to fund its operations. Chambers of Congress sharply disagree over a temporary funding bill. Here, the Capitol is seen Saturday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 10:10 am

The federal government has moved closer to the brink of a shutdown, as the House of Representatives approved a temporary funding bill Saturday night that the Senate and White House say has no chance of becoming law.

The House bill would avert the budget deadline at midnight Monday by funding the U.S. government into December. But it also includes a one-year delay of Obamacare — a provision that Democrats and some Republicans say has no place in a stopgap funding bill.

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Sunday Puzzle
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

What's That (Vowel) Sound?

NPR

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 2:13 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a made-up, two-word phrase in which each word has two or more syllables. The first vowel sound in the first word is a short "e." Change that short "e" to a short "a" sound, and phonetically you'll get the second word of the phrase. For example, given "energetic backwoods father," you would say "peppy pappy."

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Politics
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The Ins And Outs Of A Shutdown

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For more on the budget standoff, we're joined now by NPR's national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Good morning, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Good morning, Rachel.

MARTIN: Sounds like this is happening, Mara. Are we on our way to a government shutdown?

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Africa
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

'I Knew Something Was Terribly Wrong'

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Katherine Walton and her five children were in Nairobi's Westgate Mall when it was stormed by terrorists last week. After four hours in hiding, several Kenyans helped them escape. I reached Katherine Walton yesterday on her cell phone in Nairobi. And I asked her when she first realized the mall was under attacked.

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Africa
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Al-Shabab Attracts International Recruits

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

The massacre at Nairobi's Westgate Shopping Mall last week, has put the Somali-based terrorist group al-Shabab under new international scrutiny. To understand more about this group's history, its motives and capabilities, we've reached out to Peter Bergen. He's a counterterrorism expert with the New America Foundation here in Washington.

Thanks so much for being with us.

PETER BERGEN: Thank you, Rachel.

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Around the Nation
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Report Notes Poor Communication In Deaths Of Arizona Hotshots

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Poor communication contributed to the deaths of 19 elite firefighters in Arizona this past June. That's just one of the findings of a long-awaited report on the Yarnell Hill Fire that was released yesterday. It was the deadliest U.S. wildfire in 80 years. The report lays out in detail what happened that day but it does not address why it happened or who was responsible. NPR's Ted Robbins was in Prescott, Arizona and he brings us the story.

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Law
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Hate Crime Opponent Becomes A Victim

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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National Security
6:02 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The F-35's History Of Costly Problems

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

In the midst of all these budget battles, debt ceiling fights and the sequester that has forced the government to cut billions of dollars in programs, the Pentagon is going forward with the most expensive weapons system ever.

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Three Books...
5:03 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Brief, Bright And Beautiful: Three Books On Nordic Summer

The far north of Europe, where I come from, is supposed to be the Mecca of melancholy. And yet there's a contradiction to our famous Nordic gloom: the Nordic countries are as much associated with light as with darkness. From our folklore to our folk songs to our literature, the Arctic summer light pierces our darkest tales. The season is almost like a religion to us.

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Movie Interviews
3:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, On Life And The Lenses We Look Through

With Don Jon, the actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, who stars as the titular porn-addicted Jersey boy, adds writer and director to his resume.
Relativity Media

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Joseph Gordon-Levitt's movie Don Jon is about a young, simple guy with a few basic passions: his body, his pad, his cars, his family, his church, his girls, and his porn.

That's right: Jon is addicted to pornography. You could say he's managing that addiction pretty well — until he becomes taken with Barbara, played by Scarlett Johansson.

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Television
3:58 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The Most Shocking Moments Are True In 'Masters Of Sex'

Michael Sheen and Lizzy Caplan play famous sex researchers William Masters and Virginia Johnson in a new series, Masters of Sex.
Craig Blankenhorn Showtime

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:53 pm

The new TV series Masters of Sex is set in the middle of the last century — before the 60's, before the pill, almost, it seems, before the invention of sex. It's the story of William Masters and Virginia Johnson, pioneering researchers in the field of human sexual response, and it's based on a 2009 book of the same name, by Thomas Maier.

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Parallels
3:54 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Holy Smokes, Batman, You're Protesting In Brazil!

An anti-government demonstrator dressed as Batman carries a Brazilian flag at a protest during Brazil's Independence Day celebrations in Rio de Janeiro earlier this month. The protesters called on the government to provide better security, education, health and public services.
Ricardo Moraes Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:52 am

It's not Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, but people are dressing up anyway.

A group of Brazilian protesters have been coming out in costume at demonstrations against Rio's governor, Sergio Cabral. There's the masked crusader Batman, of course, but also a motley assortment of other characters, including Captain Jack Sparrow from the Pirates of the Caribbean franchise.

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Politics
3:43 am
Sun September 29, 2013

House Vote Brings Government To The Verge Of A Shutdown

The lights are on at the Capitol as the House of Representatives works into the night Saturday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 9:22 am

Shortly after midnight Sunday morning, the House of Representatives passed a bill that would keep the government's lights on. It would also delay the Affordable Care Act for a year, making the legislation a non-starter for Senate Democrats and the president.

The ball is back in the Senate's court now, with fewer than 40 hours until a government shutdown begins.

The House bill does three things. First, it's a temporary measure to keep government operations funded through the middle of December.

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A Blog Supreme
3:37 am
Sun September 29, 2013

The Jazz Documentarian Who Won The Lottery

"Don't Blame Me" for the web series Capsulocity." href="/post/jazz-documentarian-who-won-lottery" class="noexit lightbox">
Vocalist Brianna Thomas and Michael Mwenso sang a duet of "Don't Blame Me" for the web series Capsulocity.
Courtesy of Capsulocity

Originally published on Sun September 29, 2013 6:51 pm

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U.S.
3:35 am
Sun September 29, 2013

Insurance Exchanges Will Open To Scrutiny, Curiosity, Confusion

Workers at a Minnesota health care exchange prepare for opening day on Tuesday.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Mon September 30, 2013 9:51 am

Tuesday is a big day for the White House. That's when new health insurance exchanges open in every state, where people can buy the insurance the Affordable Care Act requires next year. They will also see if they qualify for new subsidies to help them afford it.

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Author Interviews
4:59 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

'Faithful Scribe': Tracing Ancestry Through Pakistan's History

The Faithful Scribe, by Shahan Mufti

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 5:10 pm

In The Faithful Scribe, Shahan Mufti examines the history of Pakistan and its relationship to the United States. He also explores how his own family story is part of the tumultuous story of the world's first Islamic democracy.

"A huge impetus for me in writing this book was actually being on both sides of this present conflict, where America is involved in this war in Afghanistan," Mufti tells NPR's Arun Rath. "As we know, the place of Pakistan in this conflict is very dubious and questionable."

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Health Care
4:52 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

The Religious Alternative To Obamacare's Individual Mandate

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:54 pm

The Affordable Care Act requires nearly every American to have health insurance or pay a penalty, beginning Jan. 1. The so-called "individual mandate" has been controversial ever since the law was passed.

But for people who fall into a few select categories, the mandate doesn't apply. Like Native Americans who get health coverage through the Indian Health Service, or people who are incarcerated.

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The Two-Way
3:58 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

NSA Reportedly Uses Data To Chart Americans' Social Ties

Efforts by the National Security Agency to track potential suspects and find connections between them have led the agency to collate its reams of data with information drawn from sources that include GPS locators and Facebook profiles, according to The New York Times. The newspaper cites documents provided by Edward Snowden, the former NSA contract worker, as well as interview with officials.

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World
3:18 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Mexican State's Anti-Corruption Plan: Hire Female Traffic Cops

Dressed in the black and neon orange colors of the new transit police, these women are slated to replace a force of notoriously corrupt traffic cops in Mexico State.
Edith Chapin NPR

Originally published on Mon October 7, 2013 5:25 pm

In the central State of Mexico, officials are trying a new approach to fight corruption.

Authorities have hired hundreds of women and put them in charge of issuing all traffic violations. They're trying to crack down on the famous mordida, or bribe — a favorite among Mexico's crooked traffic cops.

Authorities say women are more trustworthy and less corrupt than men. But the plan has run into a few snags.

Choosing Female Cops

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Around the Nation
3:18 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Under Pressure, Calif. City Dismantles Homeless Encampments

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 4:52 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Next, we're headed to Fresno, California. The city has one of the highest homeless populations per capita in the country. Fresno has been a poor city for a long time. But since the recession, the situation of the city's homeless has become even more wretched. Like a lot of places, Fresno was hit hard when the housing market collapsed. Large shanty towns covering several acres began to sprout up around downtown. Facing pressure to act, in recent weeks, city officials armed with brooms and backhoes began dismantling them.

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Fire Report Details What Happened To 19 Ariz. Hotshots

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 4:52 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

From NPR West, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath.

Three months after 19 firefighters died on the Yarnell Hill fire in Arizona, the officials have released a long-awaited report detailing what happened to the Granite Mountain Hotshots. The report was given to the firefighters' families this morning, then released online and in a news conference in Prescott, Arizona.

NPR's Ted Robbins is there, and he's with us now to discuss what was the worst loss of life in a wildfire in 80 years. Ted, what does the report say?

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U.S.
3:18 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

House Takes On Temporary Spending Bill

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 4:52 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

From NPR West, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Arun Rath.

Since the Affordable Care Act was passed four years ago, the House has voted more than 40 times to repeal or defund all or part of it. At this hour, the House once again is set to vote on a measure that would delay the rollout of Obamacare for a year. That is one of two amendments the House Republicans are adding to a bill that would keep the government open for business past Monday. Without a stop-gap spending bill, a partial government shutdown will begin on Tuesday.

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Fresh Air Weekend
2:26 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Elton John, 'Masters Of Sex' And 'Merchants Of Meth'

Elton John tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that The Diving Board is "a very adult album."
Joseph Guay Courtesy of the artist

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
2:10 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Report On Arizona Hotshots' Deaths Finds A Communications Gap

A map shows the movements of the Granite Mountain Hotshot crew as they fought the Yarnell Hill fire in late June.
Arizona State Forestry Division

Originally published on Sat September 28, 2013 2:40 pm

The 19 firefighters who died after being trapped by an Arizona wildfire in late June were only about 600 yards from a designated safety zone at a ranch, according to a task force formed by the Arizona State Forestry Division to investigate the firefighters' deaths.

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Parallels
2:03 pm
Sat September 28, 2013

Two Young Girls, A World Apart, United By Twin Tragedies

The author's daughter, right, with her friend Banita. The two girls lived next door to each other in Nairobi.
Courtesty of David McGuffin

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:53 am

When the Navy Yard mass shooting took place in Washington on Sept. 16, my 10-year-old daughter got a one line e-mail from her best friend in Nairobi, where we used to live. It read: "r u ok."

Her friend Banita had seen the news on television in Kenya. She was worried. My daughter wrote back that she was fine. We now live in Washington, but miles away from the site of the latest mass killing here in the U.S.

In this globalized world, communications can bring quick comfort.

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