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Shots - Health News
1:05 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Should Severe Premenstrual Symptoms Be A Mental Disorder?

Women's moods can change based on the phases of their menstrual cycle. But does that mean they have a psychiatric disorder?
Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:37 pm

The way Ronna Simmons of Philadelphia describes it, every two weeks a timer goes off.

Simmons, 24, will have been doing just fine, working, taking care of her daughter. And then suddenly everything changes. Normally cheerful, Simmons says she begins to hate herself.

"I tell everybody, 'I'm not myself right now,' " she says. " 'I'll call you back when I'm Ronna again.'"

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StoryCorps
1:04 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Air The StoryCorps Theme, Cue The Tears

Radio documentarian Dave Isay stands next to one of two StoryCorps Airstream trailers outfitted with recording studios a few years after the project was launched. StoryCorps is celebrating its 10th anniversary.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:37 pm

NPR's Steve Inskeep has a confession to make. In order to remain composed as the host of Morning Edition, he sometimes has to turn the volume down in the studio when the StoryCorps segment airs on Fridays.

"I just wait for the clock to run down so I know when to talk at the end because otherwise I know I'm going to lose it if I listen to that story," Inskeep tells StoryCorps founder Dave Isay. "It's deeply moving."

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Shots - Health News
1:03 am
Mon October 21, 2013

Enrollments For Health Care Exchanges Trickle In, Slowly

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:37 pm

The Obama administration's hopes ran high that millions would flock to enroll for health insurance on state and federal exchanges established under the Affordable Care Act.

Those exchanges went online Oct. 1. The administration projected that half a million individuals or families would enroll within 30 days, according to The Associated Press.

But three weeks in, the data suggest the actual number of enrollments is lagging far behind that number.

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Music Interviews
1:01 am
Mon October 21, 2013

TLC: A Girl Group's 20 Years Of Ups And Downs

TLC's Chilli and T-Boz attend the New York premiere of CrazySexyCool on Oct. 15, 2013.
Brad Barket Getty Images for VH1

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 1:37 pm

Twenty years ago, Tionne Watkins, Lisa Lopes and Rozonda Thomas came together for the first time to sing and dance for music executives in the hopes of landing a spot in a singing group.

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Books
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

For The Ultimate Getaway, Why Not South Sudan?

Most people associate the Nile with Egypt, but the river also flows through South Sudan, where much of it is bordered by jungle. That makes it a excellent destination for rafting and wildlife enthusiasts, says travel guide author Max Lovell-Hoare.
Courtesy of Levison Wood/Secret Compass

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

With cooler temperatures approaching, you might be in the market for a perfect wintertime vacation. Maybe someplace sunny and warm, unspoiled by tourists, with beautiful views and rich culture.

To find all that, you might consider South Sudan. That's the suggestion from Sophie and Max Lovell-Hoare, authors of the Bradt Travel Guide to the young country.

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Movie Interviews
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

'Captain Phillips': A First-Time Actor, Opposite Tom Hanks

Barkhad Abdi (center) learned to swim, navigate small skiff boats, handle weapons — and act — for the film Captain Phillips.
Jasin Boland

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Before landing a role opposite Tom Hanks in the film Captain Phillips, Barkhad Abdi had never acted.

"This was my first time acting, or even thinking about acting," Abdi tells NPR's Arun Rath.

Captain Phillips is based on a true story: the hijacking of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama. Hanks stars as the title character, Capt. Richard Phillips, and Adbi plays Muse, the man who leads the charge against ship and crew.

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Science
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Climate Watcher Says He's Done With Flying

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Meteorologist Eric Holthaus has made his career monitoring the Earth's climate, and he's alarmed at what he sees. After reading a new, bleak international report on climate change, Holthaus has decided one important way to reduce his carbon footprint is to give up airplane travel for good.

Science
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

To Fix Climate Change, Scientists Turn To Hacking The Earth

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 12:52 pm

In the summer of 2012, a small group of the Haida people, a native community in Canada, had a problem. The salmon they rely on were disappearing. So the Haida took matters into their own hands.

They partnered with an American businessman, drew up plans and then took a boat full of iron dust into the waters off their home island and put the dust in the ocean.

When they spread the iron dust, it created a big algae bloom. They hoped the algae would soak up carbon dioxide and bring back the fish.

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Around the Nation
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

World's Eyes On Washington's New Recreational Pot Rules

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Washington State has finalized rules for recreational marijuana sales, joining Colorado in beginning to create a legal framework for the pot industry. Randy Simmons, deputy director of the Washington Liquor Control Board, says other states and even other countries are watching Washington's developing system very closely.

All Tech Considered
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

What's Creepy, Crawly And A Champion Of Neuroscience?

The RoboRoach device allows users to influence the movements of cockroaches with a smartphone.
Backyard Brains

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Soon you'll be able to direct the path of a cockroach with a smartphone and the swipe of your finger.

Greg Gage and his colleagues at Backyard Brains have developed a device called the RoboRoach that lets you control the path of an insect.

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Music Interviews
3:19 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

Anoushka Shankar And Norah Jones: Half-Sisters Collaborate At Last

Anoushka Shankar's new album, Traces of You, comes out Tuesday.
Harper Smith Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:02 pm

Anoushka Shankar began playing sitar with her famous father, the late Ravi Shankar, when she was 4. But until recently, she'd never entered a studio with her other famous relative, half-sister Norah Jones.

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The Two-Way
1:16 pm
Sun October 20, 2013

SEE: Banksy's Month (So Far) In New York City

A man takes a photograph while another poses in front of Banksy's latest work depicting a pre-Sep. 11 New York City skyline.
Daniel Pierce Wright Getty Images

The reclusive British street artist Banksy has unleashed an interesting experiment on New York City.

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The Two-Way
11:58 am
Sun October 20, 2013

As Strike Continues, Two Bay Area Transit Workers Killed By Train

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) trains sit idle at a BART maintenance facility on the first day of the BART strike on October 18, in Richmond, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Two Bay-Area transit workers performing a track inspection were killed by an out-of-service train on Saturday, the Bay Area Rapid Transit agency said.

The accident comes amid a strike that has paralyzed the system. The New York Times reports:

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The Two-Way
10:17 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Obama Administration Addresses Health Care Website Fumbles

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange internet site.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

The Obama administration has started to confront the many technological problems that have hampered the roll out of the new health care law.

"I think that there's no one more frustrated than the president at the difficulty in the website," Treasury Secretary Jack Lew said on Meet the Press this morning.

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The Two-Way
8:52 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Wildfires In Australia Destroy 200 Homes, May Get Worse

The charred headland at Catherine Hill Bay near Wyong on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia.
Dean Lewins EPA /LANDOV

Authorities in Australia say major wildfires that have already scorched about 200 homes and 269,000 acres, could get worse.

CNN reports:

"'These conditions that we are looking at are a whole new ballgame and in a league of their own,' said the commissioner of rural fire services, Shane Fitzsimmons. 'The predictive charts indicate that there will be a significant impact on populated areas should all these forecasts materialize.'

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The Two-Way
6:49 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Sox Vs. Cards: 5 Things To Know About The World Series

Jonny Gomes of the Boston Red Sox celebrates after defeating the Detroit Tigers in Game Six of the American League Championship Series at Fenway Park on Sunday.
Jared Wickerham Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 12:45 pm

The Boston Red Sox clinched the American League pennant last night during a 5-2 win over the Detroit Tigers in Game 6 of the American League Championship Series.

That means the World Series matchup is set: It'll be the Red Sox vs. the St. Louis Cardinals beginning Wednesday in Boston.

With that, here are five things you should know about the upcoming championship series:

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun October 20, 2013

No Time To Be Bashful

NPR

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 10:16 am

This week we have a celebrity edition of the Puzzle. Comedian Paula Poundstone is taking on our challenge. Poundstone is also a regular panelist on NPR's Wait Wait Don't Tell Me.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Syrian Peace Talks To Start In November

Arab League Secretary General Nabill el-Araby says negotiations to broker a political solution to Syria's bloody civil war will begin in November.
Amr Nabil AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 11:50 am

Negotiations to try to broker a political solution to Syria's bloody civil war will begin in Geneva on Nov. 23.

That's according to Arab League chief Nabil el-Araby, who spoke to reporters after meeting with Lakhdar Brahimi, the joint U.N.-Arab League envoy to Syria.

These meetings have been a long time coming, but until now have not materialized because at different points, the Syrian regime and the Syrian rebels have refused to come to the table.

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Health
5:47 am
Sun October 20, 2013

With Addiction, Breaking A Habit Means Resisting A Reflex

Addiction can come in a lot of forms, but the characteristics are the same.
aurumarcus Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 9:27 am

The pull of addiction can come from many directions: from food to alcohol to the Internet. So what connects those dependencies?

"Addiction is a memory, it's a reflex. It's training your brain in something which is harmful to yourself," says Dr. Charles P. O'Brien, co-founder of the Center for Studies of Addiction at the University of Pennsylvania.

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Three Books...
5:03 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Prohibition-Era Passion: Three '20s Books On Trailblazing Loves

On both sides of the Atlantic, the 1920s saw strict gender roles bend — and break — as new kinds of relationships were tested in life and literature. Here, British actor Leslie Henson and his wife Madge Saunders show off the spirit of subversion in November 1920.
Brooke Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 9:36 am

The 1920s were a time of literary liberation.

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Code Switch
4:14 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Asian-American Band Fights To Trademark Name 'The Slants'

The Slants' band members are all of Asian descent.
Courtesy of The Slants

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 8:08 am

The Slants, a six-member band from Portland, Ore., calls their sound "Chinatown Dance Rock" — a little bit New Order, a little bit Depeche Mode. They describe themselves as one of the first Asian-American rock bands. Their music caters to an Asian-American crowd, they've spoken at various Asian-American events, and they're proud of all of it.

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Author Interviews
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Helen Fielding On Bridget Jones: Still Looking Good At 51

Helen Fielding says she wanted to explore a common predicament: getting older, finding yourself single again, and having to deal with a changed dating landscape.
Alisa Connan

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Who could forget that slightly manic — but ever so endearing — single gal looking for love in London: Bridget Jones. From her first diary entries in 1996, to her portrayal on the big screen in 2001, to her most recent ramblings in this year's Mad About the Boy, we've gotten to go inside the mind of Bridget Jones and see the truth, the whole truth about what it's like to be a woman most definitely now not in her 30s.

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Author Interviews
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Drinking To 'Numb,' Women Gain On Men In Alcohol Abuse

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 10:07 am

Carrie Bradshaw and her rounds of cosmopolitans; Bridget Jones with her glasses of chardonnay; Chelsea Handler declaring her passion for vodka. In sitcoms, rom-coms and comedy shows, female boozers are the stuff of jokes. They suffer through hangovers, complain about their bar bills, promise to cut back and then cheerfully renege.

But many women find that their drinking doesn't lead to laughter. In the U.S. and Western Europe, growing numbers of women struggle with alcoholism; in some places, women's rates of alcohol abuse have achieved parity with men's.

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Media
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

What Glenn Greenwald Could Gain From New Media Venture

Glenn Greenwald, who first reported the disclosures of U.S. surveillance programs, is now leaving The Guardian to work with eBay founder Pierre Omidyar on a new journalism venture.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Glenn Greenwald, who broke the story about the U.S. government's massive surveillance program, is quitting The Guardian. He's leaving the British daily and joining a journalism startup with eBay founder and billionaire philanthropist Pierre Omidyar.

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The Salt
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Unleashed On Halloween, Monster Cereals Haunt Hoarders

This Halloween season, the three big Monster Cereals will be joined by Frute Brute and Fruity Yummy Mummy, which haven't been on the market in decades.
Dan Pashman

Originally published on Mon October 21, 2013 1:11 pm

This Halloween season, the cereal monsters are on the loose. Count Chocula, Boo Berry and Franken Berry have consumers in their grasp — for a limited time only.

General Mills' line of "Monster Cereals" originally hit the market in the early '70s, but the company decided in 2010 they would only be available during the Halloween season.

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World
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

Saudi Act Of Protest Stuns U.N., And Some Observers

The U.N. Security Council votes on a resolution requiring Syria to give up its chemical weapons last month in New York. Last week, Saudi Arabia turned down a chance to take a seat on the Council.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 6:58 am

Known for quiet diplomacy, Saudi Arabia is taking an unusual and very public step to protest the international community's failure to resolve the crisis in Syria and other issues that interest Riyadh.

On Thursday, Saudi Arabia was elected to become a non-permanent member of the United Nations Security Council, which the Saudi ambassador to the U.N. initially called a defining moment in his nation's history.

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Parallels
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

You Have Questions About The NSA; We Have Answers

A sign outside the National Security Agency campus in Fort Meade, Md.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Sun October 20, 2013 2:48 pm

Four months have passed since former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden began spilling secrets about the NSA's surveillance programs, but many Americans still don't know what to think about the disclosures.

For good reason. The surveillance programs are highly technical, involving the bulk interception of huge volumes of communication data as they traverse multiple links and networks. The laws governing what the NSA can do are complex and open to conflicting interpretations.

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Technology
4:12 am
Sun October 20, 2013

When Playing Video Games Means Sitting On Life's Sidelines

The reSTART center for Internet addiction is in the woods outside Seattle. The initial, inpatient part of the program is held on a property that has a treehouse and a garden.
Rachel Martin NPR

Originally published on Tue October 22, 2013 2:49 pm

A facility outside Seattle, surrounded by pine trees, is a refuge for addicts — of technology.

There are chickens, a garden and a big treehouse with a zip line. A few guys kick a soccer ball around between therapy appointments in the cottage's grassy backyard.

The reSTART center was set up in 2009. It treats all sorts of technology addictions, but most of the young men who come through here — and they are all young men — have the biggest problem with video games.

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The New And The Next
4:04 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

The New And The Next: Punk Rock Love, A Sensible Scary Movie

Courtesy of Ozy

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 8:30 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

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Around the Nation
4:04 pm
Sat October 19, 2013

For Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, A Mixed Midterm Report Card

Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel speaks at his election night party on Feb. 22, 2011, in Chicago. As mayor of Chicago, Emanuel has faced major challenges, ranging from a ballooning deficit to education, the economy and crime.
Kiichiro Sato AP

Originally published on Sat October 19, 2013 4:41 pm

A little more than two years ago, Chicago's then-mayor-elect, Rahm Emanuel, expressed his gratitude to supporters on election night.

"Thank you Chicago, for this humbling victory," he told the crowd. "You sure know how to make a guy feel at home."

But today, Emanuel faces sobering challenges common to most of American's biggest cities.

Not only are schools troubled, Chicago's homicide rate spiked last year — a total of 516 murders — the highest in 10 years. Unemployment is 9 percent. And the city's deficit is looming near the $1 billion mark.

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