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Simon Says
3:47 am
Sat July 13, 2013

Retire The Phrase, 'This Wouldn't Be A Scandal In Europe'

Reporters swarm around former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer as he attempts to collect signatures for his run for New York City comptroller.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:22 am

I hope we've heard the last of people saying, "This would never be a scandal in Europe." They usually mean "sex scandal," and by now I think Americans are entitled to boast that we've become as blase about politicians with their pants down — or, in the case of Anthony Weiner, pec-flexing with his shirt off — as Europeans like to think they are.

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News
10:49 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Abortion Rights Activists Plan Challenge To Texas Measure

Abortion rights opponents, dressed in blue, and supporters, wearing orange, rally in the state Capitol rotunda Friday before the vote on a set of sweeping abortion restrictions.
Tamir Kalifa AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 11:31 am

In a major victory for the anti-abortion movement, the Texas state Senate passed a sweeping bill early Saturday that has become a flashpoint in the national abortion debate. Gov. Rick Perry is expected to sign it in short order.

But the fight is not over. Abortion rights supporters say that the new law attempts to overturn Roe vs. Wade in Texas, and that's why they plan to take their fight to the courts.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Prediction

Now that we're no longer the fattest country in the world, our panelists predict what the U.S. will do to regain our No. 1 status.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Lightning Fill In The Blank

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Limericks

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Duck-billed humans, a Twisted Tribute, and Toddler Toupees.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:08 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Not My Job: A 'Gilligan's Island' Quiz For Novelist Gillian Flynn

Heidi Jo Brady

Gillian Flynn is a very nice person who writes books about very unpleasant people. Her suspenseful, best-selling mystery novel Gone Girl is told from the perspective of Nick and Amy, a couple who are as unreliable as narrators as they are as spouses.

Since Flynn's name, Gillian, is just one letter short of "Gilligan," we've invited her to answer three questions about the classic TV series Gilligan's Island.

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The Salt
4:57 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Micro-Garden Madness: You Showed Us Your Stuff

Tomatoes and herbs grow in barrels in this urban micro-garden.
Nico Sanchez via Flickr/Creative Commons

Originally published on Tue July 16, 2013 8:30 am

Earlier this week, we told you about some of the people who are trying to make micro-gardening go big — by sharing their DIY tips and selling products designed to make gardening in a small space a piece of cake. Many readers of The Salt let us know they were all for it.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

San Francisco Hospital Reports Third Death In Asiana Crash

A third death has been reported in the crash-landing of Asiana Airline flight 214, as San Francisco General Hospital said Friday that one of its patients who was injured in the accident has died. Hospital officials described the victim as a girl; they offered no further details about her.

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Movie Interviews
4:26 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Guillermo Del Toro, On Monsters And Meaning

A child of the '60s and '70s, Guadalajara-born director Guillermo del Toro has been a fan of the Japanese kaiju film tradition since he was a kid. His latest movie, Pacific Rim, is his passion project and homage to the genre.
Rafy Warner Bros. Pictures

From the audience-pleasing Hellboy to the critically acclaimed Pan's Labyrinth, Guillermo del Toro's movies are chock-full of mystical, often terrifying creatures. Now the Mexico-born director has made a big-budget entry in the genre that helped define his fascination with the monstrous: the Japanese kaiju films of the '60s.

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NPR Story
4:19 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Sphinx Fragment In Israel Hints At Former Egyptian Connection

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

People have been puzzled by sphinxes, at least since the time of the ancient Greeks. And now, we can count another riddle of the mythical Egyptian creature that is part-lion, part-human. The feet of a sphinx - with a telling hieroglyphic inscription - have turned up in a dig in northern Israel, near the ancient city of Hazor. The find suggests an Egyptian connection at a time, with a place, that was previously unknown.

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The Two-Way
4:04 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Pakistani Schoolgirl Wounded In Taliban Attack Addresses U.N.

Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani advocate for girls' education who was shot in the head by the Taliban, speaks at the United Nations Youth Assembly on Friday.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:59 pm

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teen who was attacked by Taliban militants for promoting education for girls, received several standing ovations as she addressed the United Nations on Friday, calling on world leaders to provide free compulsory schooling to every child.

In October, Malala was shot in the head by Taliban militants who attacked a schoolbus she was on. She was targeted for her campaign promoting girls' rights.

"They thought that the bullets would silence us, but they failed," she said.

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Code Switch
4:01 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Years Later, Miss Indian America Pageant Winners Reunite

Vivian Arviso says her year of service as Miss Indian America included a stint answering tourists' questions at Disneyland's Indian Village.
Sheridan County Library

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

The women who were crowned Miss Indian America are reuniting this weekend in Sheridan, Wyo. The Native American pageant ran from 1953 to 1984 and attracted contestants from across the country. Originally, the pageant started as a way to combat prejudices against Native Americans.

Wahleah Lujan, of Taos Pueblo in northern New Mexico, who won the title in 1966, was very shy at the time. In one of her appearances right after she was crowned, she told an audience: "The most important thing in my life is the preservation of our ancient pueblo and the Rio Pueblo de Taos."

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It's All Politics
4:01 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

'Illusioning Victory From Defeat': A Washington Story

New York Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer speaks at a news conference on gun legislation earlier this year.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:39 pm

At the end of another demoralizing and unproductive Washington week, it struck us that the messaging of failure is a very delicate business — for members of both flailing parties.

New York Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer's straight-faced characterization of the House GOP's rejection of his immigration bill as "encouraging" best illustrated the problem.

For nothing was hopeful and nobody was a winner in the nation's capital this week.

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National Security
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Homeland Security Secretary Napolitano To Resign

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano is stepping down to take charge of the University of California system.

Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Wal-Mart Threatens To Pull Out Of D.C. Over Wage Requirements

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Wal-Mart is threatening to walk away from plans to build three of six new stores slated for the nation's capital. Those three stores are supposed to go up in some of the city's neediest neighborhoods. But the city council in Washington, D.C., has approved a bill requiring big box stores to pay employees a living wage of $12.50 an hour. And Wal-Mart says if that becomes the law, it will scrap its plans.

NPR's Allison Keyes spoke to people in those communities about their thoughts on the standoff.

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Business
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Boeing Takes Another Hit With Fire On Plagued 787 Dreamliner

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

An Ethiopian Airlines jet caught fire on the ground today at London's Heathrow Airport. It was a Boeing 787, also known as the Dreamliner, which has more than its share of troubles. The 787 has had serious problems with its lithium-ion batteries. In January, one overheated and another caught fire. The whole 787 fleet was grounded for more than three months after that.

Here's NPR's John Ydstie with more on what happened today.

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Europe
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Train Derailment Kills At Least Six People Near Paris

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A train wreck outside of Paris tonight at the height of rush hour has shocked the nation that relies heavily on passenger rail. An intercity commuter train derailed, at least six people were killed and scores wounded.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley has more from Paris.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Beyond Leadership Issues, Egypt Has Deep Economic Troubles

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

As Egypt inches closer to forming an interim government, at the top of the agenda is economic reform. The Egyptian economy today is dismal. Foreign currency reserves have shriveled. Tourism is way down, unemployment way up.

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Political Crisis In Egypt
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Egypt's Polarization Descends Into Personal Relationships

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Ahmed Assem has become the poster child of what Muslim Brotherhood leader's are calling a massacre — last Monday's assault by security forces on angry Islamist protesters. Assem was a photographer who filmed his own death. An army sniper shot him down. The killing has torn Assem's family apart. His brother is a police officer who blames the Brotherhood for the violence, but the family, like Egypt itself, is now deeply divided and unsure what is to come.

Europe
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Royal Baby Craze Reaches New Heights In U.K.

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A few months ago, amid raging civil war in Syria and political turmoil in Turkey, there was another overseas story also making headlines. Bob Garfield, co-host of the program ON THE MEDIA from NPR and WNYC, was intrigued by what he saw. The story came to his attention during a full hour broadcast from ABC News.

(SOUNDBITE OF ABC NEWS STORY)

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Iraq
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

In Iraq, One Scammer Took Advantage Of The IED Epidemic

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Our next story illustrates a variation on an old theme. There's a military procurement officer born every minute. In the current issue of Bloomberg Businessweek, Adam Higginbotham has an article with the stunning title, "The $38 Million Bomb-Detection Golf Ball Finders." It's about a man named James McCormick, a Briton who managed to make a very good living selling devices that he claimed detected bombs. He sold them in many countries, most notably Iraq, where concealed bombs, so-called improvised explosive devices were epidemic.

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Middle East
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Taliban Attack Survivor Speaks At U.N. On Her 16th Birthday

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A young Pakistani girl who survived a Taliban attack last year was at the United Nations today, appealing for education for all children. It was the first public speech by Malala Yousafzai since the Taliban tried to kill her near her school in Pakistan's Swat Valley last year. Today also happens to be her 16th birthday, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Around the Nation
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Community Leaders Brace For Fallout From Zimmerman Verdict

Chimurenqa Waller leads demonstrators in a chant in front of the Seminole County Courthouse while the jury deliberated in the trial of George Zimmerman on Friday
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Sat July 13, 2013 5:30 am

As the nation waits for the jury's verdict on George Zimmerman, community leaders in Florida are in place, prepared for a big public reaction.

Government and law enforcement officials say they're hoping for the best with any demonstrations that may come after the verdict. But they're also preparing for the worst – rising tensions that could escalate violently.

An 'Opportunity' For Peace?

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Law
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Jury Begins Deliberations In George Zimmerman Case

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. A jury in Sanford, Florida is beginning deliberations in the electric and closely watched trial of George Zimmerman. Zimmerman is charged with second degree murder and manslaughter in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin. He's pleaded not guilty. He said he acted in self defense. We have two reports now on the trial and preparations outside the courtroom.

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National Security
3:05 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Snowden's Asylum Contingent On Not Leaking More Secrets

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 4:19 pm

Former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden is requesting asylum in Russia while he pursues a more permanent asylum in Latin America. A condition of his continued stay in Russia is that he stop releasing information that is damaging to the US.

The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Justice Tightens Guidelines For Obtaining Records From Media

Attorney General Eric Holder speaking at the Justice Department last month.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:59 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder announced a tightening of Justice Department guidelines for dealing with the sensitive issue of subpoenas of journalists' communications, weeks after embarrassing disclosures that his office had secretly obtained phone records and emails from reporters as part of a probe of unauthorized leaks.

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The Two-Way
2:31 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

U.S., Germany Call For Release Of Ousted Egyptian Leader

Supporters of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, outside Cairo's Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque on Friday.
Marwan Naamani AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:11 pm

The United States has joined Germany in calling for the release of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, who has been detained since a July 3 military coup in Cairo.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said that Washington and Berlin were in agreement that Morsi should be freed.

The Islamist leader was deposed after massive, nationwide protests against his rule, and he's been held at an undisclosed location since then.

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Code Switch
2:21 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Awkwardly Awaiting The Zimmerman Trial's Outcome

George Zimmerman wipes his face after arriving in the courtroom for his trial in Sanford, Fla., on Friday. Zimmerman is charged in the 2012 shooting death of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.
Joe Burbank AP

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 2:40 pm

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The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

Man Hailed As A Hero After Epic Swim Saves Stranded Family

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 3:10 pm

"It wasn't an option. It just had to be done."

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Arts & Life
1:27 pm
Fri July 12, 2013

To The Beaches Of Chile, Hallucinogens In Tow

Jamie (Michael Cera) is a reflexively judgmental cynic whose drunken invitation locks him into a road trip with a stranger (Gaby Hoffmann), whose different take on life cracks his shell a little.
IFC

Sebastian Silva's 2009 film The Maid examined the physical and psychological demands of working as a nearly indentured live-in housekeeper, and the toll taken by more than 20 years in the same household.

Perhaps in part because Silva based the film on his childhood growing up in Santiago, Chile, the approach to a subject rife with issues of social class was more personal than overtly political.

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