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The Two-Way
5:25 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Cyclist's Felony Manslaughter Plea First Of Its Kind In U.S.

A bicyclist who struck and killed a pedestrian in San Francisco last year has pleaded guilty to felony vehicular manslaughter, prosecutors announced Wednesday. The conviction is said to be the first of its kind in the nation.

The accident happened when 37-year-old Chris Bucchere rode through several red lights and struck 71-year-old Sutchi Hui and his wife, who were crossing the intersection.

Hui died four days later from his injuries.

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The Two-Way
5:22 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

George H.W. Bush Shaves His Head In Support Of Ailing Boy

George H.W. Bush with Patrick, the two-year-old son of one of the members of his security detail.
Office of George H.W. Bush

In a very sweet gesture, President George H.W. Bush shaved his head to show solidarity for Patrick, the two-year-old son of one of the members of his Secret Service detail.

Patrick, Bush's spokesman Jim McGrath said on Twitter, is undergoing treatment for leukemia, so he lost his hair.

McGrath tweeted this picture of Bush with the little guy:

And this one of Patrick with Bush and the entire Secret Service detail:

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Europe
5:21 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Royals Reveal New Baby's Name

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Finally this hour, the news that some of you at least have been anxiously awaiting. The royal baby has a name, several of them, in fact. George Alexander Louis. We'll break down that monitor for you now.

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National Security
5:03 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

House Rejects Measure That Would Have Curbed NSA Program

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:58 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

On Capitol Hill, an effort to limit the authority of the National Security Agency has fallen short. It was the first chance for House lawmakers to vote on the government's phone surveillance program since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. They rejected an amendment that the White House and top intelligence officials had lobbied hard against.

NPR's Tamara Keith joins us from Capitol Hill. And, Tamara, the amendment was defeated. How close was it?

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Law
4:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

S.C. Court Orders 'Baby Veronica' Adoption Finalized

The South Carolina Supreme Court has ordered finalization of the adoption of "Baby Veronica" by a couple living near Charleston, S.C.
Melanie Capobianco AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:51 pm

Lawyers for the biological father of a Native American child are expected to make a last-ditch appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday, hoping to prevent the return of the child to her adoptive parents.

But the four-year legal saga is likely near an end.

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The Two-Way
4:00 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Train Derailment In Spain Leaves Dozens Dead

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 1:22 am

Update at 3:20 a.m. Thursday: Death Toll Rises

The Associated Press reports that 77 people were killed when a train derailed in northwestern Spain, according to Maria Pardo Rios, spokeswoman for the Galicia region's main court. Four died at hospitals, while 73 were found dead at the scene, she said.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Spanish newspaper El País paints a bloody picture of the scene of a train derailment in Santiago de Compostela, Spain, on Wednesday.

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Environment
3:52 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

What's Swimming In The River? Just Look For DNA

Biologists normally look for the hellbender slamander, which is known by the nickname "snot otter," under rocks in streams. But now there's a gentler way: They can take water samples and look for traces of the animals' DNA.
Robert J. Erwin Science Source

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:34 pm

If you want to protect rare species, first you have to find them. In the past few years, biologists have developed a powerful new tool to do that. They've discovered that they can often find traces of animal DNA in streams, ponds — even oceans.

The idea took root just five years ago, when biologists in France found they could detect invasive American bullfrogs simply by sampling pond water and looking for an exact genetic match to the frogs' DNA.

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Code Switch
3:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How Musicians Helped Integrate The Silver Screen

When Gene Krupa's orchestra was cast in 1941's Ball of Fire, trumpeter Roy Eldridge's presence was not negotiable.
Express Getty Images

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 10:28 am

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Business
3:29 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Full-Time Vs. Part-Time Workers: Restaurants Weigh Obamacare

The California Tortilla chain is one company still deciding how to react to the new health care requirements for business, set to take effect next year.
John Ydstie NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Many businesses that don't offer health insurance to all their employees breathed a sigh of relief earlier this month when they learned they'd have an extra year to comply with the new health care law or face stiff penalties.

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The Two-Way
3:19 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Nominates Caroline Kennedy To Be Ambassador To Japan

Caroline Kennedy in February of 2013.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 3:22 pm

President Obama has nominated Caroline Kennedy to serve as the United States' ambassador to Japan.

NPR's Mara Liasson filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"The daughter of President John F. Kennedy and an early and significant supporter of President Obama's, Kennedy is also an attorney and the author of several best-selling books. If confirmed she would fit a tradition for the Japan post — where many other prominent Americans have served. But she would be the first female ambassador to Japan.

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The Two-Way
3:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Why The Latest Gulf Leak Is No BP Disaster

Fire boats battle a fire at the off shore oil rig Deepwater Horizon in April 2010.
U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 4:06 pm

Teams of workers are mobilizing in the Gulf of Mexico to try to stem a natural gas leak at an offshore drilling rig that exploded and caught fire Tuesday. The rig off the Louisiana coast has been partially destroyed by the out of control blaze, and firefighting boats are on the scene.

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On Aging
3:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Move Over Nursing Homes — There's Something Different

There are no strict schedules at Green House homes, so resident Charles Tyler, 72, is free to stay in his recliner in the living room during mealtimes.
Ina Jaffe NPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

One thing just about everyone dreads as they age is the possibility of ending up in a nursing home. We all think we know what that's like: sharing a room with strangers, sitting slumped in a wheelchair all day, rigid schedules, bad smells. And for more than 1 million Americans, this is home. But there's an effort to change all that, and it's known as The Green House Project.

In the past 10 years, more than 140 of these alternative, nonprofit nursing homes have been built in 24 states.

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Shots - Health News
3:17 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How A Family Copes With Schizophrenia And Suicide

Homer Bell's family: sister Laura Bell (from left), sister Regina Bell, mother Rosalind Scott and stepfather Jack Wilcox.
Jeff Cohen WNPR

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Homer Bell was 54 years old when he killed himself in April in a very public way — he laid down his head in front of a stopped bus in his hometown of Hartford, Conn. It was the last act in a life filled with struggle, as Bell and his family endured his schizophrenia.

At a time when there are calls to strengthen the mental health system, Bell's story shows how hard coping with mental illness can be.

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Code Switch
3:01 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

How The Death Of A 12-Year-Old Changed The City Of Dallas

Twelve-year-old Santos Rodriguez was shot and killed by a police officer in Dallas on July 24, 1973.
Courtesy of the Dallas Mexican American Historical League

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

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Education
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Senate Passes Student Loan Legislation To Lower Interest Rates

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 7:31 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

After a long wait, the Senate has finally passed student loan legislation. It would restore lower interest rates for undergraduates. Many of them saw their rates double on July 1st when the Senate missed its deadline.

As NPR's Ailsa Chang reports, the new measure closely resembles both what the president wanted and what the House has already passed.

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Politics
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Speech Part Of Attempt To Refocus Economic Policy

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Joining us from the White House is Gene Sperling, director of the president's National Economic Council. Welcome to the program once again.

GENE SPERLING: Well, thank you for having us.

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Politics
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Obama Kicks Off Economic Speaking Tour In Illinois

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

President Obama went on the road today to reboot his economic agenda with a message that he called a better bargain for the middle class. He returned to Knox College in the small town of Galesburg, Illinois, to launch an economic speaking tour. Galesburg is where, eight years ago, the newly elected Senator Obama delivered his first big economic speech. And as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports, many of the themes haven't changed since then.

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National Security
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Snowden's Presence A 'Comfortable' Problem For Russia

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

In Russia today, there was speculation that Edward Snowden might leave the transit area of a Moscow airport. He's been stuck there for the past month.

Earlier today, Russian media were reporting that Snowden would be receiving travel documents that would allow him to officially set foot on Russian soil. As NPR's Corey Flintoff reports, those stories were premature, but they revealed that the fugitive situation is more complicated than it might seem.

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Africa
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Military Signals Impending Crackdown On Morsi Supporters

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel. The U.S. has delayed plans to deliver F-16 fighter planes to Egypt. The move is intended to send a message of concern about the Egyptian military's management of the country after ousting the elected president. The news came on the same day that Egypt's military chief, General Abdul Fatah al-Sisi, called for mass demonstrations.

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Around the Nation
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

'Bat Cave' Road In Chicago Accessible To Only A Few

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

In Chicago, there's a two-and-a-half-mile roadway that the mayor calls the Bat Cave. It's been around for more than a decade, but it's not well known. The mini-highway was designed to ferry conventioneers to Chicago's convention hall.

But as NPR's Cheryl Corley reports, some local politicians are arguing that the Bat Cave is being reserved for politicians with special clout.

(SOUNDBITE OF VEHICLES)

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Energy
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Offshore Drilling Rig Remains On Fire In Gulf Of Mexico

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

An offshore drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico is on fire. Regulators say the rig has partially collapsed. It all began yesterday when members of a drilling crew lost control of a natural gas well they were completing. The crew was evacuated from the rig as a cloud of gas escaped into the air. And then last night, the gas caught fire. NPR's Jeff Brady tells us more.

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National Security
2:45 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Proposed House Amendment Would Limit NSA's Authority

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

House lawmakers will have their first chance today to vote on the government's phone surveillance program, since news of it was leaked by Edward Snowden. The House is considering an amendment that would limit the authority of the National Security Agency. It's an amendment the White House and top intelligence officials have urged lawmakers to vote down.

For more, we're joined from the Capitol by Tamara Keith. Hi, Tamara.

TAMARA KEITH, BYLINE: Hi, Robert.

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

In First Public Mass In Brazil, Pope Francis Urges Humility, Charity

Pope Francis celebrates Mass at the Basilica of the National Shrine of Our Lady Aparecida on Wednesday in Aparecida, Brazil.
Buda Mendes Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 2:50 pm

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Shots - Health News
1:18 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Plan B To Hit Shelves, Protected From Generics

The Plan B One-Step morning-after pill will now be available to women as young as 15 without a prescription, and will have another three years of protection from generic competition.
AP

Originally published on Thu July 25, 2013 3:54 pm

As expected, the Food and Drug Administration has granted an additional three years of protection from generic competition to the makers of the most popular form of the emergency contraceptive pill,

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The Two-Way
12:51 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

Principal In Indian Lunch Poisoning Tragedy Is Arrested

Indian children and activists shout anti-government slogans on Saturday as they march to parliament demonstrating against the death of 23 children in Bihar state after they ate poisoned "midday meals."
Raveendran AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:56 pm

More than a week after 23 children in India died after eating an insecticide-laced lunch, the principal in charge of the school's mid-day meal program has been arrested.

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Book Reviews
12:44 pm
Wed July 24, 2013

'My Lunches With Orson' Puts You At The Table With Welles

Central Press Getty Images

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 12:53 pm

If you asked me to name my favorite movie scene, I'd choose the one in Citizen Kane when newspaper owner Charles Foster Kane steals his rivals' best reporters, then throws a party in his own honor. As musicians literally sing his praises, we watch Kane dance with chorus girls wearing a look of radiant delight. It's a moment bursting with promise and cockiness and joie de vivre, made all the more exuberant because Kane's pleasure is so obviously shared by Welles himself.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Wed July 24, 2013

Royal Baby Gets A Name: George Alexander Louis

Britain's Prince William, right, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge hold the Prince of Cambridge on Tuesday as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary's Hospital in London.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 1:15 pm

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have now named their new baby boy: The third in line for the British throne was given the name George Alexander Louis.

"The baby will be known as His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge," the crown said in a press release.

By historical standards, this is an expedited naming. In the past, royals have waited weeks to announce a name. Prince Charles' name wasn't known for a month; Prince William's name wasn't made public for seven days.

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Code Switch
10:53 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

Univision Clips 'Tweety's' Wings

Univision has canceled a popular Spanish-language radio show hosted by Eddie Sotelo, also known as Piolín or "Tweety Bird."
Damian Dovarganes AP

If you drive anywhere in greater Los Angeles, you know that you spend a significant amount of time staring at the bumper of the car ahead of you. And you may have noticed that a lot of those bumpers have red and yellow stickers that say "PIOLÍN por la MAÑANA." A lot.

The stickers show up on everything from sleek luxury cars to beat-up pickup trucks, and they advertise the morning drive-time radio show of Eddie "Piolín" Sotelo. (Piolín translates into "Tweety Bird" in Spanish—a gleeful moniker for the cheerful, diminutive host.)

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Kitchen Window
10:08 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

On Hot Summer Days, Cook Your Fish Without Fire

Deena Prichep for NPR

There are the summer days where we bake cobbler and pie, and grill up slabs of eggplant and bushels of corn. And then there are the tropically hot summer days where the thought of turning on an oven — or even an outdoor barbecue — is enough to make you want to flop your sweaty self across the bed (or, better yet, into a pool of cold water). On those dog days, you don't want your food warm from the grill — you want it dripping with cold.

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Sweetness And Light
8:03 pm
Tue July 23, 2013

NCAA Should 'Bolster And Reinforce' African-American Players

Jaimie D. Travis iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed July 24, 2013 9:59 am

"And this is a long-term project: We need to spend some time in thinking about how do we bolster and reinforce our African-American boys? And this is something that Michelle and I talk a lot about. There are a lot of kids out there who need help who are getting a lot of negative reinforcement." President Obama

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