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4:16 am
Sun July 28, 2013

A World A Few Degrees Of Whimsy Away From Our Own

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:11 am

Anthony Marra is the author of A Constellation Of Vital Phenomena.

Ditie, the narrator of Bohumil Hrabal's transcendent novel, I Served the King of England, is described in the jacket copy as "a hugely ambitious but simple waiter in a deluxe Prague hotel." I first crossed paths with him when I, myself, was working as a night porter in a deluxe Edinburgh hotel.

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Art & Design
4:15 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Stories Of Race In America Captured On Quilt And Canvas

As a black, female artist in the 1960s, Ringgold says there were "a lot of people trying to get in my way and keep me from doing what I was doing." Above, a 1965 self portrait.
Jim Frank On loan from Elizabeth A. Sackler

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:31 am

Artist Faith Ringgold is best known for what she calls her story quilts — large canvases made in the 1980s, on which she painted scenes of African-American life: sunbathing on a tar roof, a mother and her children, a quilting bee. She frames the canvases in strips of quilted fabric, carrying out an old African, and African-American quilt-making tradition.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington is showing an earlier aspect of Ringgold's art: big, strong, vivid paintings from the 1960s that reflect the violence and social upheaval of that time.

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Parallels
3:51 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Nelson Mandela, Robert Mugabe And The Countries They Shaped

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe (left) greets South African President Nelson Mandela in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1998. The two men have shaped their countries in dramatically different ways.
Rob Cooper AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:41 am

As the ailing Nelson Mandela turned 95 this month, the international community celebrated his legacy and rooted for his recovery.

Just to the north in Zimbabwe, President Robert Mugabe, 89, is running for re-election this week. He's looking to extend his 33 years in power, which have been marked by authoritarian rule, economic collapse and international isolation.

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News
3:43 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Which Citizens Are Under More Surveillance, U.S. Or European?

Protesters demonstrate against alleged NSA surveillance in Germany during a rally in Hannover, Germany, on Saturday.
Peter Steffen AP

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

The disclosure of of previously secret NSA surveillance programs has been met by outrage in Europe. The European Parliament even threatened to delay trade talks with the United States.

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News
3:40 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Religious Orders Use Pope's Visit To Recruit Young Postulants

People dance in laser lights in a tent during World Youth Day events in Quinta de Boa Vista park, where religious orders are holding a job fair of sorts to recruit new postulants.
Silvia Izquierdo AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:07 pm

The Quinta de Boa Vista park is far away from the celebrations in Copacabana Beach, where three million people gathered Saturday to hear Pope Francis speak. But the park is attracting a crowd of young people.

Kiosks for religious orders like the Carmelites, the Franciscans and the Legion of Mary line the park. It looks like a job fair, and in a way, it is.

Nuns from the Immaculate Conception of Our Lady of Lourdes dance around in front of their stand, to the banging of drums and the strumming of guitars.

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News
3:40 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Reinvigorating A Detroit Neighborhood, Block By Block

Woodward Avenue runs through Midtown, a Detroit neighborhood that is reviving in the midst of the larger city's decline. In the background is downtown Detroit.
Carlos Osorio AP

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

The debt-laden city of Detroit has been an incubator for new strategies in urban revitalization, including a downtown People Mover, casinos, urban farms, artist colonies and large scale down-sizing.

In the wake of the city's bankruptcy, many in the community are thinking small.

Just outside of downtown Detroit is a neighborhood called Midtown. Like many hip, urban neighborhoods, it's got hipsters on fixed geared bikes, yoga studios, boutiques for dogs.

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Sunday Puzzle
1:06 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Psst ... It's Class Time

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

On-air challenge: This puzzle is supersonic. Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name that has the consecutive letters S-S-T. Specifically, the first word will end in S-S, and the second word will start with T. For example, given, "A situation in which people speak on top of each other," you would say, "cross talk."

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Political Crisis In Egypt
4:22 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Crackdown In Egypt Shows Shift In Military's Approach

An Egyptian man mourns the death of a relative, shot dead after violence erupted Friday night, inside the Muslim Brotherhood field hospital in Cairo.
Florian Plaucheur AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 8, 2013 10:56 am

In Egypt, protests against the ouster of President Mohammed Morsi turned deadly Saturday, after Egyptian security forces launched the most violent crackdown yet on those demonstrators.

The Egyptian Health Ministry says around 80 people were killed — most of them in Cairo. The Muslim Brotherhood, from which the deposed president hails, put the death toll at nearly twice that number. Hundreds more were injured.

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Author Interviews
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

In 'The Panopticon,' They're Always Watching

During the 19th century, a panopticon was a prison or asylum with an all-seeing eye. Some of the C-shaped prisons with central watchtowers still stand in the U.S. and Europe.

Jenni Fagan's new book borrows the panopticon idea as the setting for a gritty, often poetic, novel. The story is based loosely on Fagan's own experience growing up in the Scottish foster care system for 16 years.

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U.S.
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

How Americans Said No To Cocaine After Years-Long Addiction

Narcotics officers in New York seized 3,586 pounds of cocaine and $1.3 million seized in 1997. Cocaine use in the U.S. has dropped by almost half since 2006.
Gino Dominico AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:56 am

In the 1980s, if you moved in certain circles — or picked up the newspaper — a certain white powder was everywhere, common as dust.

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A Blog Supreme
3:25 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Piano Mastery, Trinidadian Trumpet, Singing Apes: New Jazz

Trumpeter Etienne Charles' new album is called Creole Soul.
Laura Ferreira Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 8:26 am

It's been too long since we simply sat up and pointed out a few of the many new releases worth a set of ears. Luckily, the staff on weekends at All Things Considered thought the same. They invited me to sit down with host Jacki Lyden and play a few cuts for them.

Here's music from an elder statesman of piano, a trumpeter who understands creole music personally, a drummer who writes tunes with a payoff, and a singer in her early 20s with maturity and kick.

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Handful Of Tracks Propelled J.J. Cale To Big Leagues

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 3:25 pm

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

And as we mentioned earlier in the show, singer-songwriter J.J. Cale has died. If you're not familiar with his name, you've probably heard some of his music. He penned hits from the 1970s and '80s that were recorded by Eric Clapton, Lynyrd Skynyrd and many others. The success of those songs gave him the freedom to release his own albums for more than four decades. NPR's Dan Bobkoff has this remembrance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CALL ME THE BREEZE")

LYNYRD SKYNYRD: One, two, one, two...

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NPR Story
2:54 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Film Unveils Underpinnings Of Mass Killings In Indonesia

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 3:25 pm

The film The Act of Killing is the most talked about movie of the year. It's a film that is both fiction and nonfiction. Filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer talked to the old men in charge of the death squads in Indonesia in the 1960s that killed somewhere between 500,000 to 2 million civilians in the name of thwarting communism.

NPR Story
2:54 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Diseases That Never Went Away: Battling Drug Resistance

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 3:25 pm

Why are these antiquated diseases on the rise again, and how strong is the threat of drug-resistant bacteria? Host Jacki Lyden talks to Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Ga., about this trend in infectious diseases.

The Two-Way
2:06 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

More Than 1,000 Prisoners Escape In Massive Libyan Jailbreak

Libyan protesters shown after ransacking the offices of the Muslim Brotherhood-backed Party of Justice and Construction, in Tripoli on Saturday.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 3:14 pm

More than 1,000 inmates, many convicted of serious crimes, have escaped from a prison in Libya's eastern city of Benghazi, the country's prime minister confirmed.

According to The Associated Press, it wasn't immediately clear if the jailbreak at Koyfiya prison was part of a larger series of protests taking place across the country on Saturday in response to the assassination on Friday of prominent political activist Abdelsalam al-Mosmary, who was an outspoken opponent of the Muslim Brotherhood.

According to AP:

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All Songs Considered
1:11 pm
Sat July 27, 2013

Newport Folk Festival 2013: Day One In Photos

Dancing in the rain at Newport.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 8:04 am

It always rains at least one day at the Newport Folk Festival, and because Newport started a whole day earlier this year, we got the downpour out of the way first. But that didn't stop folks from dancing and singing along to The Mountain Goats, JD McPherson, Blake Mills and many more.

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Sat July 27, 2013

New Zealand Cites Obesity In Denying Chef's Work Visa

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 12:05 pm

Chef Albert Buitenhuis has been declared too fat to live in New Zealand, a country with one of the highest obesity rates in the developed world.

Immigration officials recently informed South African Buitenhuis that his work visa would not be renewed because, at 286 pounds, he falls short of what Wellington deems "an acceptable standard of health."

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NPR Story
10:59 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Ex-Rep. Lindy Boggs: Advocate For Women, Dedicated To Family

Cokie Roberts (far left) and Steve Roberts with Cokie's mother, Lindy Boggs, and children Lee and Rebecca in 1969.
Courtesy of Cokie and Steve Roberts

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:01 am

Lindy Boggs died Saturday morning. She was 97 years old, had served in Congress for close to 20 years and also as the U.S. ambassador to the Vatican, appointed by President Bill Clinton.

But those achievements, great as they are, do not begin to sum up the life and accomplishments of Lindy Boggs. As many of you know, she is part of our family at NPR: Her daughter is Cokie Roberts. And she has many friends here, as she does everywhere.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Three Capitals Observe 60th Anniversary Of Korean Armistice

Tourists visit the Korean War Veteran Memorial on the National Mall on Friday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Sixty years after the armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War, North Korea was celebrating 'Victory Day' with a show of military force that included goose-stepping soldiers, mobile missile launchers and armored columns.

In South Korea, meanwhile, President Park Geun-hye vowed not to tolerate provocations from Pyongyang.

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The Two-Way
9:33 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Former Louisiana Congresswoman Lindy Boggs Dies At 97

Former Democratic Rep. Lindy Claiborne Boggs attends the Distinguished Service Award ceremony at the Capitol in May 2006 in Washington, D.C.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:51 am

Former Rep. Lindy Boggs, the first woman elected to Congress from Louisiana and an ardent civil rights campaigner, has died at age 97.

Boggs went to Congress after a special election to succeed her late husband, Thomas Hale Boggs, Sr., who had died in a plane crash in Alaska. She served in the House for nearly two decades.

She died of natural causes at her home in Chevy Chase, Md., according to her daughter, NPR senior news analyst and ABC News journalist Cokie Roberts.

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The Two-Way
8:52 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Singer, Songwriter J.J. Cale Dead From Heart Attack At 74

J.J. Cale wrote hits including "After Midnight" and "Cocaine" for Eric Clapton.
R. Diamond WireImage/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat August 3, 2013 7:12 am

J.J. Cale, whose songs became hits for the likes of Eric Clapton and Lynyrd Skynyrd, has died at age 74 from a heart attack, his management agency's website announced.

Cale died at about 8 p.m. Friday at Scripps Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., the Rosebud agency said Saturday.

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Train Driver Held In Spain Following Deadly Derailment

Men stand next to the train engine stored in a warehouse in Escravitude, 10 miles from the site of Wednesday's crash.
David Ramos Getty Images

Spain's Interior Minister, Jorge Fernandez Diaz, announced Saturday that the driver of a high-speed train that derailed this week, killing at about 80 people near the town Santiago de Compostela, has been detained on suspicion of negligent homicide.

Diaz said Francisco Jose Garzon Amo has been discharged from the hospital and taken to a police station, The Associated Press reports.

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Fresh Air Weekend
7:03 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Maria Bamford, 'Lunches With Orson' And '& Sons'

Maria Bamford is a stand-up comedian and voice actress. She recently appeared in the fourth season of Arrested Development.

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 9:11 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Gunman, Six Others, Killed In Florida Apartment Standoff

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 7:05 am

A Florida gunman seized hostages and killed six people in an eight-hour standoff at an apartment complex that ended early Saturday when a SWAT team stormed the building and fatally shot the assailant.

The deadly incident occurred in Hialeah, a town just a few miles north of Miami. Police were quoted by The Associated Press as saying the bodies of three women and two men were found at the scene and that another man had been killed nearby. Two hostages were unharmed.

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The Two-Way
5:42 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Scores Killed As Egypt Demonstrations Turn Deadly

Supporters of Egypt's ousted President Mohammed Morsi carry an injured man to a field hospital following clashes with security forces at Nasr City.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 7:58 pm

The top of this post was last updated at 9:45 p.m. ET:

About 80 people have been killed and hundreds injured in bloody clashes overnight in and around Cairo after protests escalated into violence, with supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi saying police shot at demonstrators.

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports that Egypt's Ministry of Health has updated the number of dead to 80, with 792 injured.

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Sports
5:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

'You Gotta Keep Smashin' And Smashin' And Smashin'!'

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's summertime, and on weekend nights all across the country, that means demolition derby time - cars bashing cars for the pure thrill of it. Charles Lane from member station WSHU recently went to a demo on New York's Long Island, the legendary home of the demolition derby. He brought back this audio postcard.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Fire it up (unintelligible).

CHARLES LANE, BYLINE: A white four-door Chevy Impala. It's got graffiti writing down the side that says Misery Machine, and it's number 86.

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News
5:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Egypt Demonstrations Turn Deadly

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. Scott Simon is away. I'm Linda Wertheimer. In Cairo overnight, Egyptian police fired on supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi, killing dozens of people and wounding hundreds more.

(SOUNDBITE OF PROTEST)

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: (chanting in foreign language)

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News
5:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Defense Begins Case In Bulger Trial

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Health
5:32 am
Sat July 27, 2013

Why Do People Still Die Of Heart Disease?

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

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Author Interviews
5:18 am
Sat July 27, 2013

'The Telling Room': This Cheese Stands Alone

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 10:59 am

Here's a great piece of travel writing, storytelling, mythmaking and hero worship — all rolled into one book with a near record-breakingly long title. It's by magazine writer Michael Paterniti of GQ, and it's called The Telling Room: A Tale of Love, Betrayal, Revenge, and the World's Greatest Piece of Cheese.

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