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The Two-Way
6:16 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Hague: A Deal With Iran Is 'On The Table' And 'Can Be Done'

International negotiators, including Secretary of State John Kerry and U.K. Foreign Minister William Hague, in Geneva for talks on Iran's nuclear program.
Christophe Bott AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 7:53 am

Despite the fact that a marathon negotiating session over Iran's nuclear program came up empty, international diplomats tried to put a positive spin on reaching a deal on Iran's nuclear program.

U.K. Foreign Minister William Hague told the BBC:

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Sunday Puzzle
6:03 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Capitalize On 'This Minus That'

NPR

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

On-air challenge: Every answer is the name of a state capital, to be identified from its anagram. For example, given "banally" minus the letter L, the answer would be "Albany."

Last week's challenge from the Emmy-winning TV comedy writer Mike Reiss: A famous actress and a famous director share the same last name, although they are unrelated. The first name of one of these is a classic musical. The first name of the other is an anagram of a classic musical. Who are they?

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Law
5:34 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Portland's Pot Vote Could Make It A Gateway City For Maine

Medical marijuana has been legal in Maine since 1999, and Portland voters legalized possession for recreational use just last week.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

It's been a big year in the marijuana legalization movement. Not only did Colorado and Washington voters make marijuana legal last November, but this week Coloradans approved a ballot measure to tax marijuana sales.

Also this week, Michigan voters in three cities removed penalties for possession. And in Portland, Maine, voters passed by an overwhelming margin an ordinance to legalize possession of up to 2.5 ounces.

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National Security
5:34 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Why Does The NSA Keep An EGOTISTICALGIRAFFE? It's Top Secret

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

What do the following words have in common?

SHARKFINN
KEYSTONE
DISHFIRE
TWISTEDPATH

The answer? They're all NSA code words.

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contractor, leaked thousands of documents about some of the most secretive programs run by the U.S. government. So secret, they're all given classified names.

You may have heard of PRISM, the name of the secret NSA program that vacuums up Internet communications. Turns out just about everything else at the world's biggest spy agency has its own code word.

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You Must Read This
5:03 am
Sun November 10, 2013

A Youngest 'Daughter' Remembers Famines, Shame And Hope

AFP/Getty Images

Hong Ying's autobiography, Daughter of the River, is doubly astonishing. First, it's an account of the Cultural Revolution that's not written by an intellectual. There's a certain genre of Chinese memoir that looks at upheaval under Mao through an elite lens, and I have to admit, I've been growing tired of those books. But Hong Ying comes from a very different background indeed.

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The Sunday Conversation
3:15 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Nazi Hunter Dedicates Career To Pursuing Justice

Eli Rosenbaum's team has investigated and prosecuted more than 1700 Nazi cases.
Department of Justice

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

More than 65 years after World War II, many Nazis are living out their lives in quiet retirements. The crimes scenes are, for the most part, cold. But Eli Rosenbaum is hot on the trail. He and his team at the Justice Department are Nazi hunters. They track down Nazis who moved to the U.S. after the war, and deport them.

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Theater
3:11 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Here's A Wild Idea For Shakespeare: Do It His Way

Mark Rylance as Olivia (right) and Samuel Barnett as Viola in Twelfth Night. The Broadway production, which first played at London's Globe Theatre, is done in the Elizabethan tradition, with an all-male cast.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:54 am

This season, New York audiences have seen wildly different interpretations of Shakespeare plays. They've seen the Romeo of Orlando Bloom make his first entrance on a motorcycle; they've seen a production of Julius Caesar set in a women's prison.

Now the London-based company from Shakespeare's Globe Theatre has landed on Broadway with what seems like the most radical concept of them all: plays staged in a style Shakespeare would've recognized, with all-male casts, period costumes and live music.

Not A Museum

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
3:10 am
Sun November 10, 2013

Inconsistencies Haunt Official Record Of Kennedy's Death

Jacqueline Kennedy (center), with Edward and Robert Kennedy on either side, watches the coffin of President John F. Kennedy pass on Nov. 25, 1963.
Keystone/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:03 am

The first thing T. Jeremy Gunn says when you ask him about President John F. Kennedy's assassination is, "I'm not a conspiracy theorist. I don't have a theory about what happened."

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The Two-Way
11:50 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Thousands Feared Dead After Typhoon Haiyan

Residents rest outside a stadium used as an evacuation center in Tacloban, Leyte province, central Philippines on Sunday after devastating Typhoon Haiyan hit the city on Friday.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:16 am

The vicious typhoon that raged through the center of the Philippines appears to have killed hundreds, if not thousands of people, and officials were reportedly struggling Sunday to distribute aid to survivors left homeless and destitute.

Deaths in the province of Leyte — mainly from drowning and collapsed buildings — could escalate to 10,000, the regional police chief told the AP. The administrator of the province capital, Tacloban, said the toll could climb that high in the city alone.

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The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Judge OKs Lawsuit That Could Change NCAA Amateurism Concept

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 1:51 pm

A federal judge on Friday issued a ruling that may cause a "fundamental change in scholarship rules and the concept of amateurism" in NCAA basketball and football, USA Today reports.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

'Days Of Fire': The Evolution Of The Bush-Cheney White House

Charles Dharapak AP

President George W. Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney left office on Jan. 20, 2009, ending a consequential — and controversial — administration. The Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the U.S. invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq, and Hurricane Katrina were just some of the major events that challenged the administration.

Peter Baker, Chief White House Correspondent for The New York Times, covered those events in real time. But he's now taken a second look at the administration and the relationship at its heart.

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The New And The Next
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Digging Into The Truth About Messages, Images And Hard Times

Courtesy of Ozy.com

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:24 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest discoveries.

This week, he tells NPR's Arun Rath about a televangelist on the rise in Singapore, a blog that takes a deeper look at viral news photography and the most surprising trend of the Great Recession.

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History
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

75 Years Ago, Kristallnacht Presaged The Holocaust

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 12:27 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

If you're just joining us, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

It was once impossible to imagine Germany without Jews. You only have to look at the Yiddish language to have a sense of how richly the Jewish experience was integrated in the cultural life of Germany. That ended in the most vicious and heinous manner 75 years ago today.

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World
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

In Egypt, Ousted President's Appearance Brings Fresh Clashes

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 10:17 am

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

The first democratically elected president of Egypt, Mohammed Morsi, appeared in court on Monday. It was the first time he had been seen in public since the military coup that ousted him in early July. Morsi is being tried on charges of inciting murder and violence. He's become a rallying symbol for his supporters who have been protesting his ouster for more than four months. One person was killed and three others injured in the violence yesterday.

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National Security
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Edward Snowden's NSA Revelations Keep Coming

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:23 pm

Since June, documents leaked by National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have produced revelation upon revelation about the nation's top-secret intelligence gathering operations. The latest information, about U.S. spying on foreign leaders, has angered even some dependable U.S. allies. New York Times national security reporter Scott Shane, and Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., a senior member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, discuss the latest Snowden-related leaks.

Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

In The Heat Of The Foundry, Steinway Piano 'Hearts' Are Made

Sparks fly as Dan Hensley pours liquid iron (at 2575 degrees Farenheit) into the mold for a piano plate destined for Steinway pianos, at O.S. Kelly foundry in Springfield, Ohio.
Noah Adams NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 12:10 pm

The Steinway piano company has a new owner. This fall, the investment firm Paulson & Co. — led by billionaire John Paulson — spent about $500 million and bought all of Steinway & Sons, the venerated piano maker.

The deal includes a foundry in Springfield, Ohio, where the Steinway pianos are born in fire.

The O.S. Kelly Foundry has been making Steinway's plates since 1938. The plate is the cast-iron heart of a piano: It holds the steel wire strings with 40,000 pounds of tension, the company says. It allows vibrations to arise in a concert hall as music.

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U.S.
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

A wheelchair is among debris from Superstorm Sandy in the Queens borough of New York on Nov. 13, 2012. A judge ruled Thursday that the city does not have adequate plans for evacuating people with disabilities.
Shannon Stapleton Reuters/Landov

A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country.

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Music Interviews
3:00 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Can I Kick It? Organ Master Lonnie Smith Can

Dr. Lonnie Smith's In the Beginning, a new album that reimagines the artist's older, out-of-print work, is out now.
Susan Stocker Courtesy of the artist

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

How A California Law To Encourage Vaccination Could Backfire

Public school student Julio Valenzuela, 11, grimaces as he gets a vaccination before the start of the school in Lynnwood, Calif., on Aug. 27. Vaccines are required for school attendance.
ROBYN BECK AFP/Getty Images

California has a new law that's supposed to get more of the state's children vaccinated against measles, whooping cough and other infectious diseases.

But the law has taken a strange turn on its way to being put into action, one that may instead make it easier for parents to exempt their children from required vaccinations.

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The Two-Way
12:52 pm
Sat November 9, 2013

Venezuela 'Occupies' An Electronics Chain To Offer Lower Prices

Shoppers loaded with purchases leave a Daka store in Caracas on Saturday.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 1:29 pm

First he re-scheduled the Christmas season. Now, Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro essentially nationalized an electronics chain in order to "protect the middle class."

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The Two-Way
11:21 am
Sat November 9, 2013

WATCH: Olympic Torch Makes Its First Space Walk

Video streamed by NASA showed Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazanskiy carrying the unlit Olympic torch, bobbing weightlessly at the end of a tether in a darkness dotted by stars.
AP

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 1:24 pm

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The Two-Way
10:05 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks End Without Agreement

Secretary of State John Kerry checks his phone before a meeting with EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs Catherine Ashton and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif in Geneva, Switzerland, on Saturday.
Jason Reed AP

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 6:38 pm

(Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET)

When Secretary of State John Kerry cut short a trip to the Middle East on Friday to head to Geneva for negotiations over Iran's nuclear program, it set up expectations that a historic deal may have been at hand.

Today, reality set in and as NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Geneva, the talks ended without an agreement.

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Sports
9:24 am
Sat November 9, 2013

The Losingest Texas Football Team

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

It's been a rough spell for the Scarborough High School football team in Houston. Very rough, actually. The Spartans are on a 46-game losing streak, the longest in Texas. Their last win was in September 2009. That means this afternoon's game against the Washington High School Eagles is the last chance for this year's seniors to earn a victory.

We're joined now by Scarborough head coach Jayson Merren. Welcome.

COACH JAYSON MERREN: How are you doing?

GONYEA: Good. And by senior defensive lineman Justin Steward. Hi Justin.

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Sports
9:24 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Lessons From The NFL Bullying Scandal

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

GONYEA: The basketball and hockey seasons are just getting going, and the big story in sports is still the drama inside the Miami Dolphins. We're referring, of course, to the bullying of second-year lineman Jonathon Martin, by veteran offensive lineman Richie Incognito. The story revealed a history of racial slurs.

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Fresh Air Weekend
8:52 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Fresh Air Weekend: Roy Choi, Industrial Musicals And 'The Story Of A New Name'

Chef Roy Choi was named Food and Wine Magazine's Best New Chef in 2010.
Bobby Fisher Courtesy of Harper Collins

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
8:06 am
Sat November 9, 2013

With House OK, Hawaii Poised To Legalize Gay Marriage

Proponents of gay marriage rally outside House chambers at the Hawaii Capitol in Honolulu on Friday.
Oskar Garcia AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:36 am

Hawaii is poised to join 14 other states that have approved same-sex marriage.

Hawaii Gov. Neil Abercrombie has indicated he will sign the bill, which was just approved by the House. If you remember, the Illinois state legislature took the same move last week. So depending on when the bills are signed into law, Hawaii will become either the 15th or 16th state to allow same-sex marriage.

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The Two-Way
6:23 am
Sat November 9, 2013

Super Typhoon Leaves More Than 150 Dead In Philippines

Children play near electric posts which were damaged after super Typhoon Haiyan battered Tacloban city in the central Philippines.
Romeo Ranoco Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 11:27 am

(Updated 7 p.m. ET)

The Philippines is just now starting to assess the damage caused by the landfall of one of the most powerful tropical cyclones in recorded history.

As Mark reported, Typhoon Haiyan roared over the Philippines with top sustained winds at nearly 200 mph.

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Theater
5:14 am
Sat November 9, 2013

'We Will Rock You': A Bohemian Musical

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 9:24 am

Transcript

DON GONYEA, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Don Gonyea. Whether or not you're a fan of rock and roll, you've surely heard at least one of the hits by Queen. The British band dominated the airwaves in the '70s and '80s and now their music is rocking the world again, this time in a jukebox musical called "We Will Rock You."

The show has been running in London for a dozen years but now an Americanized version is touring the United States and Canada. NPR's Allison Keyes was at the opening show in Baltimore.

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Author Interviews
5:14 am
Sat November 9, 2013

'A Rose Is A Rose Is A' 75-Year-Old Kid's Book By Gertrude Stein

Excerpted from The World Is Round.
Courtesy of Harper Design

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 3:01 pm

You might know Gertrude Stein from that college class where you studied her experimental fiction, or maybe you remember her as the host of salons for famous 20th-century artists like Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso and Ernest Hemingway.

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Author Interviews
5:14 am
Sat November 9, 2013

English Manners Are Downright Medieval ('Sorry!' Was That Rude?)

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat November 9, 2013 9:24 am

From that very first time we're first scolded for putting our elbows on the table at great-aunt Millie's house, we're inducted into the world of manners. After that, it's a lifetime of "pleases" and "thank yous," and chewing with our mouths closed.

But where did all of this civility come from? We can't give all the credit (or blame) to the English, but the average Brit says "sorry" eight times per day, so it's a pretty good place to start.

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