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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Israel, Palestinians To Restart Talks In Washington

Israeli Justice Minister Tzipi Livni during a meeting with Secretary of State John Kerry at the U.S. Ambassador's residence in Rome in May.
Mladen Antonov AFP/Getty Images

Israeli and the Palestinian negotiators will sit down to peace talks in Washington on Monday, picking up from where they left off five years ago, the State Department says.

Secretary of State John Kerry has personally extended an invitation to Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to send senior negotiating teams to the U.S. capital "to formally resume direct final status negotiations," spokesperson Jen Psaki said.

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Music Interviews
2:37 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

AlunaGeorge Finds A Natural Groove, By Accident

George Reid and Aluna Francis have become darlings of the European music festival circuit without releasing an album. Body Talk, their full-length debut as AlunaGeorge, is out Monday.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue July 30, 2013 1:54 pm

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Science
2:36 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Echolocation is second nature to animals such as bats and dolphins. Can humans also find their way using sound as a tool?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 9:30 am

Birds do it. Bats do it. Now even educated people do it. Echolocation is the process used by certain animals to identify what lies ahead of them, by emitting sounds that bounce off objects.

Now a team of researchers has created an algorithm that could give the rest of us a chance to see with sound.

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Science
2:34 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

Steamy days, sultry nights and swarming bugs all make up the thrum of life in the heart of summer. But more and more, our summers are assaulted by the bloodsucking kind of bugs, namely mosquitoes and ticks.

More than a nuisance, new species can impact our health and indicate larger environmental trends.

Beautiful And Adaptable

One relative newcomer prowling the scene is the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for its unique markings, it is black with white stripes.

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Environment
2:29 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Conservationists Call For Quiet: The Ocean Is Too Loud!

The beaked whale is one of the most vulnerable of all whale species to underwater noise pollution.
Robin Baird/Cascadia Research

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 4:24 pm

Just about everything that we do in the water makes noise. When we ship goods from country to country, when we explore for oil and gas and minerals, when the military trains with explosives or intense sonar systems — the noise travels.

But these man-made noises are making it impossible for sea creatures to communicate with themselves, something that is integral to their survival. Michael Jasny, the director of the Marine Mammal Protection Project for the Natural Resources Defense Council, says we have to quiet down.

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All Songs Considered
2:08 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Newport Folk Festival 2013: Day Two In Photos

The versatile bluegrass star Sarah Jarosz plays new songs from her upcoming third album, Build Me Up from Bones, as well as Joanna Newsom and Bob Dylan covers.
Meagan Beauchemin for NPR

Originally published on Sun August 4, 2013 8:04 am

The sun came out over the second day of the Newport Folk Festival — and flying hair, Flying Vs and flying drumsticks. Saturday included sets from Jim James, The Avett Brothers, Shovels & Rope, Frank Turner and much more.

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The Two-Way
12:30 pm
Sun July 28, 2013

Weiner Campaign Manager Quits After Latest 'Sexting' Scandal

Anthony Weiner, New York mayoral candidate, during a news conference on Thursday in New York.
Bebeto Matthews Associated Press

The man in charge of Anthony Weiner's campaign is stepping aside in the wake of new revelations that the candidate exchanged lewd online messages with several women. But Weiner says he's staying in the race to become mayor of New York.

Danny Kedem, who joined Weiner's campaign in early spring, resigned over the weekend, the candidate said on Sunday.

"We have an amazing staff, but this isn't about the people working on the campaign. It's about the people we're campaigning for," Weiner said after speaking at a Brooklyn church, according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
11:36 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Treasury Secretary: Congress Must End Uncertainty On Debt

Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Department of the Treasury earlier this month.
Brendan Smialowski AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 2:15 pm

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew says the debt ceiling needs to be raised, but without another economically damaging partisan fight.

In a series of interviews on the Sunday morning political talk shows, Lew said Congress needs to lift the "cloud of uncertainty" over the nation's finances and raise the limit before it fully expires on Sept. 30.

"The fight over the debt limit in 2011 hurt the economy, even though, in the end, we saw an extension of the debt limit," the secretary said on NBC's Meet The Press.

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The Two-Way
8:23 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Cannes Jewel Heist Nets Bling Worth $53 Million

Actress Sharon Stone at the 66th international film festival in Cannes in May. The Mediterranean resort town is famous for the jewelry-clad celebrities it attracts.
Joel Ryan Invision

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 1:16 pm

A jewelry exhibit at the posh Carlton Hotel in Cannes was held up on Sunday and an estimated $53 million worth of goods was swiped. It was the third such heist in the French Riviera resort in as many months.

A police spokesman, speaking to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity, says one or more thieves took the jewels around noon on Sunday, but it wasn't immediately clear if they were armed.

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The Two-Way
6:56 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Egypt Warns Of Wider Crackdown On Protesters

A general view shows brick barricades erected by protesters along Nasr City's main street in eastern Cairo on Sunday.
Fayez Nureldine AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:45 am

Egypt is ramping up threats of a wider crackdown on supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi, who have refused to end a sit-in a day after at least 80 anti-government protesters were killed in two cities in street clashes with security forces.

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The Two-Way
5:47 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Millions Gather On Rio Beach To Hear Pope Deliver Sunday Mass

Millions jammed Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro for Pope Francis' final Mass on his trip to Brazil on Sunday.
Mario Tama Getty Images

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 11:34 am

This post last updated at 11:30 a.m. EDT

Millions of faithful thronged Brazil's Copacabana Beach to hear Pope Francis deliver Sunday Mass, the culmination of the Latin American pontiff's first papal trip abroad.

Francis, speaking from a massive stage erected on the beach, urged those gathered for World Youth Day's concluding Mass to spread the Gospel "to the fringes of society, even to those who seem farthest away, most indifferent."

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Parallels
5:38 am
Sun July 28, 2013

A Simple Visa Request Vs. Afghan Bureaucracy

The collection line outside Kabul's Passport Office. NPR producer Sultan Faizy spent more than two weeks trying to get reporter Sean Carberry's visa renewed.
Sean Carberry NPR

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 6:53 am

You think getting a passport or renewing your driver's license in the U.S. is a headache? Well, welcome to Afghan bureaucracy. On July 7, Kabul correspondent Sean Carberry asked producer Sultan Faizy to begin the process of renewing Sean's six-month resident visa. Here's Sultan's log of what happened:

July 7: I took the application letter along with the copies of Sean's work permit to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Security wouldn't let me in with my press ID. After more than 30 minutes of calling the media department, I was able to drop off the letter.

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Sports
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Athletic Glory At An Advanced Age

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

The Olympic motto - Faster, Higher, Stronger - has always applied to an ideal: a young, supremely fit athlete, performing wondrous tasks. The motto means something different for athletes over 50. Thousands of them are in Cleveland for the National Senior Games. These games may be lacking in youth and buff physiques, but NPR's Tom Goldman reports the event still has great significance for those are competing and watching.

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Islamabad's Defiantly Consistent Chinese Eatery

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Cities sitting nervously on the edge of wars have a tendency to change very quickly. Take Pakistan's capital, for example. But some things never change, like an unexpectedly delicious Chinese restaurant.

News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

GOP Aims To Put Women In Office

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

The GOP has tried to bolster the number of women on Capitol Hill, as well. This week, the National Republican Committee launched Project Grow. It's aimed at recruiting, mentoring, and electing more Republican women into office - federal, state and local. Congresswoman Marsha Blackburn, of Tennessee's 7th District, joins us from City Hall in Fairview, Tennessee, just outside of Nashville.

Welcome to you and thanks so much for joining us.

REPRESENTATIVE MARSHA BLACKBURN: Oh, I'm delighted to be with you. Thank you.

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Women's Agenda Features Work-Family Balance Issues

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Obama Touts Economic Prescriptions

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Susan Stamberg, in for Rachel Martin.

President Obama says Washington has lost focus on the economy. The president's been traveling the country with his economic prescriptions - more job creation, better access to education and a stronger middle class.

NPR senior political correspondent Mara Liasson joins us now. Morning to you.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Morning, Susan.

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Dominique Strauss-Kahn Charged With Pimping

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

A French court says former International Monetary Fund head Dominique Strauss-Kahn will stand trial on charges of being part of an organized prostitution ring. The once-powerful French politician was considered a step away from the French presidency when he was accused of sexually assaulting a New York City hotel maid in May 2011. As NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports, his fall from grace isn't over yet.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: (Foreign language spoken)

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Tackling Sexual Harrassment On England's Transit

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Egypt Clashes Among Country's Worst Bloodshed

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Susan Stamberg.

Egypt's Health Ministry reports more than 70 people have died in clashes between security forces and protesters that took place on a major road in Cairo. Most of them were supporters of ousted President Mohamed Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood from which he hails.

Reaction to the fighting in Egypt is rather muted at the moment. But as NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports, a growing number of Egyptians are concerned over what the government is planning next.

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

This Fountain Of Youth Has A Little Extra Zing

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 12:21 pm

Transcript

ORSON WELLES: Of course, there are all sorts of fountains. Some are beautiful, some are purely mythological. Some are silly fountains. Of course, the silliest of all, is the fountain of youth. Old Ponce de Leon thought that one was somewhere down in Florida.

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

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Sports
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

High-Tech Boats Make Waves At America's Cup

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

Slow season for sports? Not one bit. It is the season for that favorite activity of couch potatoes - yacht racing. Also, in another elegant sporting arena, some unexpected lessons at this year's Dallas Cowboys training camp. Our teacher on all this, NPR's Mike Pesca. Hiya, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hi. Yachts and the Cowboys. That goes so well together.

STAMBERG: Yeah. So, the America's Cup right now - that's the prestigious yacht sail-off -and it seems that some of the racing boats are making some very serious waves, yes?

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

At Henry Ford's 150th Birthday Party

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

Amid all the gloom in Detroit, some people were celebrating this weekend. It's the 150th anniversary of the birth of Henry Ford, the founder of the Ford Motor Company. There was a big party at the Ford Stage in Dearborn, and people gathered there to remember the inventor who, by the way, was known for his passion for folk dance. Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton sent us this audio postcard.

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News
5:07 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Across The Country, Overpromised On Pensions

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Transcript

SUSAN STAMBERG, HOST:

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Theater
4:18 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Wallace Shawn: From 'Toy Story' Dino To Highbrow Playwright

Wallace Shawn (from left), Larry Pine and Deborah Eisenberg make up the cast of The Designated Mourner. Written by Shawn and directed by Andre Gregory, the Public Theater show is a product of one of the longest collaborations in the history of the American theater.
Joan Marcus Courtesy The Public Theater

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Wallace Shawn is famous for his career as an actor, but over the past four decades he has written a handful of plays that are intellectually demanding and rarely produced. His characters tell stories in monologues, rather than acting them out onstage, and they use cascades of words to make dizzying arguments.

His work is being showcased at New York's Public Theater this season. A revival of The Designated Mourner opened July 21 and the American premier of another Shawn play, Grasses of a Thousand Colors, will open this fall.

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Author Interviews
4:18 am
Sun July 28, 2013

'Rural Life' Adds Natural Color To 'The Grey Lady'

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

Verlyn Klinkenborg's essays about life on his farm in upstate New York have run in The New York Times since 1997. With a long family history of farming, his agricultural roots run deep into the soil.

"All of my aunts and uncles farmed; all of my cousins still farm," he says. "The home farm where my dad was raised has been in my family since the early teens, and ... following the track of modern agriculture, has changed its character hugely over time. But it's still in the family."

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You Must Read This
4:16 am
Sun July 28, 2013

A World A Few Degrees Of Whimsy Away From Our Own

Originally published on Thu August 1, 2013 10:11 am

Anthony Marra is the author of A Constellation Of Vital Phenomena.

Ditie, the narrator of Bohumil Hrabal's transcendent novel, I Served the King of England, is described in the jacket copy as "a hugely ambitious but simple waiter in a deluxe Prague hotel." I first crossed paths with him when I, myself, was working as a night porter in a deluxe Edinburgh hotel.

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Art & Design
4:15 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Stories Of Race In America Captured On Quilt And Canvas

As a black, female artist in the 1960s, Ringgold says there were "a lot of people trying to get in my way and keep me from doing what I was doing." Above, a 1965 self portrait.
Jim Frank On loan from Elizabeth A. Sackler

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:31 am

Artist Faith Ringgold is best known for what she calls her story quilts — large canvases made in the 1980s, on which she painted scenes of African-American life: sunbathing on a tar roof, a mother and her children, a quilting bee. She frames the canvases in strips of quilted fabric, carrying out an old African, and African-American quilt-making tradition.

The National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington is showing an earlier aspect of Ringgold's art: big, strong, vivid paintings from the 1960s that reflect the violence and social upheaval of that time.

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Parallels
3:51 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Nelson Mandela, Robert Mugabe And The Countries They Shaped

Zimbabwe's President Robert Mugabe (left) greets South African President Nelson Mandela in Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1998. The two men have shaped their countries in dramatically different ways.
Rob Cooper AP

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 10:41 am

As the ailing Nelson Mandela turned 95 this month, the international community celebrated his legacy and rooted for his recovery.

Just to the north in Zimbabwe, President Robert Mugabe, 89, is running for re-election this week. He's looking to extend his 33 years in power, which have been marked by authoritarian rule, economic collapse and international isolation.

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News
3:43 am
Sun July 28, 2013

Which Citizens Are Under More Surveillance, U.S. Or European?

Protesters demonstrate against alleged NSA surveillance in Germany during a rally in Hannover, Germany, on Saturday.
Peter Steffen AP

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 10:31 am

The disclosure of of previously secret NSA surveillance programs has been met by outrage in Europe. The European Parliament even threatened to delay trade talks with the United States.

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