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Book Reviews
3:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Heading West: The Gritty, Luminous 'Son Of A Gun'

Justin St. Germain teaches at the University of New Mexico.
William Bledsoe

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:17 pm

My parents married young — both were still undergraduates — and so by the time my father started graduate school in mathematics, he and my mother were the harried parents of three small children. They wanted us to see America. And so my father chose the University of Arizona — about as far as you could go from our West Virginia home without falling off the country's opposite edge. On our way, we stopped in Tombstone.

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Education
3:27 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Ala. School District Cancels Bus Service, Igniting Controversy

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

For many communities around the country, the yellow school bus is the quintessential sign that school is in session. Well, one school district is taking its buses off the roads. Citing the need to cut costs, district officials in Hoover, Alabama are canceling school bus service starting one year from now.

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Law
3:08 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

'Whitey' Bulger Found Guilty On 31 Of 32 Counts

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

A Boston jury has found James "Whitey" Bulger guilty of 11 murders, racketeering, extortion and other mob-related crimes. Bulger, who was the subject of a worldwide manhunt for more than a decade before being captured in 2011, likely faces life in prison. Audie Cornish speaks with WBUR's David Boeri.

Digital Life
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Big Buzz On Twitter Means Better Chances On Election Day

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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World
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Haiti's Cholera Outbreak Tied To Nepalese U.N. Peacekeepers

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

More than 100 years after the eradication of cholera in the island nation of Haiti, the disease has reemerged with a vengeance. A new study out of Yale University traces the outbreak back to an infected Nepalese disaster response team, dispatched by the UN in the aftermath of Haiti's massive 2010 earthquake. Robert Siegel speaks with the study supervisor, Muneer Ahmad.

Africa
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Islamists Accuse U.S. Of Complicity In Morsi Overthrow

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

More now on Egypt. Over the past year, we've checked in often with Dr. Abdul Mawgoud Dardery. He is an English professor from Luxor. He got his PhD in Pittsburgh. He is a member of the Muslim Brotherhood who ran for parliament as a candidate of President Morsi's Freedom and Justice Party. He was a moderate in that group and he won a seat from Luxor before the parliamentary elections were thrown out by a court.

He's in Washington this week as a representative of a pro-Democracy, anti-coup group. Welcome to the program once again.

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Africa
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Egypt's Security Agencies Back, Now With A New Mandate

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Law
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

NYPD's 'Stop-And-Frisk' Deemed Unconstitutional

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

A federal judge in New York City ruled that the police department has been violating the civil rights of tens of thousands of minority New Yorkers with its practice of warrantless searches, better known as "stop-and-frisk." It's a rebuke for city officials have defended the tactic as an important crime-fighting tool. Judge Shira Scheindlin is appointing a federal monitor to oversee reforms at the department.

Law
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Holder Proposes Reducing Minimum Sentences For Drug Offenses

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

Attorney General Eric Holder outlined federal steps to cut long prison sentences for some drug offenders. In a speech before the American Bar Association, Holder said the change is necessary to curb growing incarceration costs and to make the justice system more fair.

Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Waging A 'No Parking' War Along Malibu's Beaches

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

A trip to Malibu is the perfect getaway during your summer vacation. But good luck finding a place to park. Some Malibu residents place fake "No Parking" signs along the coast to keep tourists off of public beaches. And it's not just a problem in Malibu. A bill in the California Legislature would allow the state's Coastal Commission to start cracking down on the 600 backlogged public access violations along the coast.

Media
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

NPR, Ombudsman Differ On S. Dakota Indian Foster Care Series

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:14 am

After an extensive investigation lasting well over a year, NPR's ombudsman has concluded the network's series on South Dakota's efforts to put Native American children in foster care was fundamentally flawed.

The network and the ombudsman, Edward Schumacher-Matos, who is paid to critique NPR's news coverage, have split sharply over his findings.

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Around the Nation
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Firefighting's First Female General Makes Order Out Of Chaos

Jeanne Pincha-Tulley, a Type 1 incident commander, addresses the media in the then-evacuated town of Idyllwild, as the Mountain Fire grows closer. Pincha-Tulley has a reputation for being frank and direct with the media and public. "For the next two days," she said, "the fire is going to put embers right over this town."
Nate Rott NPR

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 5:55 pm

A line of dirty fire engines rumbles off of Southern California's Pine to Palms Highway into an open field, trailing a cloud of brown dust. The drivers' faces are smudged with black soot.

Across the road, helicopters land to fill with water and fuel before whacking their way back up through the smoky sky. The scenic San Jacinto Mountains behind them are bare and black, burnt clean of tree and bush. Puffs of gray smoke rise like faint ghosts.

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All Songs Considered
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Question Of The Week: What Are The Best Apps For Making Music?

Apple's Garage Band for the iPad and iPhone includes virtual instruments, such as piano and drums, you can play like the real thing.
 

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 8:57 am

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Research News
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Particle Physicists Want A New Collider To Study The Higgs

This simulated image shows what information about a Higgs particle would look like in the proposed International Linear Collider.
Norman Graf interactions.org

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 4:03 pm

"It's a very curious time in high-energy physics," says Michael Peskin, a researcher at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California. On the one hand, researchers have just made the most significant discovery in decades: In July of last year, they announced they had found the Higgs particle at a collider in Switzerland. The Higgs is part of the mechanism that gives mass to everything. It is so fundamental that without it, we wouldn't exist.

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Music Reviews
3:06 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Shine And The Moonbeams: R&B For The Kids

Shawana Kemp, lead singer for Shine and the Moonbeams.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:03 pm

Family music comes in a broad range of styles – folk, rock, punk and even polka. But, compared with its popularity among adults, there have been very few R&B and soul music albums for kids. Enter Shine and the Moonbeams.

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Shots - Health News
3:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Dementia Test Tweaked For Gen X: Hirohito Out, Oprah In

Is Oprah Winfrey a celebrity for the ages?
Surian Soosay Flickr

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:56 am

It's bad enough to have to be tested for dementia. It's even worse if the test isn't fair. Researchers in Chicago found they needed to update the screening test for a type of early onset dementia so that the measure would more accurately pick up symptoms among a new wave of patients — baby boomers and Gen Xers.

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New In Paperback
2:35 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Aug. 12-18: Jimi Hendrix, The Everglades And The 'Iron Curtain'

AP

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:18 am

* Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Code Switch
2:26 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Medgar Evers' Son Honors Civil Rights Icon In His Own Way

After Medgar Evers was murdered, his wife, Myrlie Evers, carried on his work. This photo shows Myrlie Evers and her children, Van, 9; Darrell, 16; and Rena, 14, in June 1969 in their Claremont, Calif., home.
AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:06 pm

James Van Dyke Evers was only 3 when his father, Medgar, was assassinated in the driveway of the family's home in Jackson, Miss., in June 1963.

A sniper shot Medgar Evers in the back as he returned from a meeting late at night. Tensions had been running high because Evers, the first field secretary for the NAACP, was making headway in pushing the state's black citizens to register to vote. White Mississippians who had lived comfortably under segregation could feel the ground shifting beneath them — and they didn't like it.

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The Salt
2:05 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Three Ways Cooking Has Changed Over The Last 300 Years

Maids at work in a large kitchen, circa 1890.
W. and D. Downey Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 2:56 pm

Cooking with calf's head and cow heel may not sound like the most palatable way to spend an afternoon, but it's all in a day's work for librarian Judith Finnamore of London's Westminster Archive Centre.

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All Tech Considered
2:05 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

The Biggest Twitter Moments Ever Feature Beyonce, Romney

At a peak of 268,000 tweets per minute, Beyonce's 2013 Super Bowl halftime performance was the biggest moment on Twitter, ever.
Chris Graythen Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 6:14 pm

The conclusion of Beyonce's high-wattage Super Bowl spectacular — and the subsequent blackout in the New Orleans Superdome — are the first and second most tweeted-about moments in Twitter history, according to the social media giant.

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The Two-Way
1:34 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

'Ocean's 16' Powerball Winners Claim Share Of Jackpot

The winners of the Aug. 7 Powerball jackpot pose with a check for their share of the $448 million grand prize.
Sam Fromkin New Jersey Lottery

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 2:19 pm

The 16 women and men who won more than $86 million in last week's Powerball drawing validated their ticket and posed with a gigantic check Monday. The group, which calls itself "Ocean's 16," famously worked at the Ocean County Vehicle Maintenance Department the day after they learned they would become millionaires.

"Lottery officials say each will get about $3.8 million after taxes," the AP reports.

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Shots - Health News
1:03 pm
Mon August 12, 2013

Brains Of Dying Rats Yield Clues About Near-Death Experiences

Could the images common in accounts of near-death experiences be explained by a rush of electrical activity in the brain?
Odina iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 5:57 am

A burst of brain activity just after the heart stops may be the cause of so-called near-death experiences, scientists say.

The insight comes from research involving nine lab rats whose brains were analyzed as they were being euthanized. Researchers discovered what appears to be a momentary increase in electrical activity in the brain associated with consciousness.

Although the experiment relied on animals, the results could apply to humans, too, the researchers say.

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The Two-Way
11:56 am
Mon August 12, 2013

James 'Whitey' Bulger Guilty Of Murder, Racketeering

A courtroom sketch of James "Whitey" Bulger (left) and defense attorney J.W. Carney, Jr.
Margaret Small AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 2:38 pm

James 'Whitey' Bulger, the notorious Boston gangster who spent 16 years on the lam before being captured in June of 2011, was found guilty of multiple murders and racketeering by a federal jury in Boston on Monday.

Facing 32 charges, Bulger was convicted on most of them, including 11 murders that date back to the '70s and multiple counts of extortion and money laundering.

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The Two-Way
11:51 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Iconic Butter Cow In Iowa Doused With Red Paint

This photo provided by Iowans for Animal Liberation shows the 2013 butter cow at the Iowa State Fair in Des Moines, Iowa. Authorities confirmed Monday that people had gained access to the display, poured red paint over the butter sculpture and scrawled, "Freedom for all," on a display window.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:43 pm

The iconic butter cow, sculpted meticulously every year at the Iowa State Fair, was doused with red paint early Sunday. Vandals also used the paint to scrawl "Freedom For All" on its glass enclosure.

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The Salt
11:32 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Jim Shoe

Behold.
NPR

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 12:20 pm

The Chicago sandwich containing gyro meat, roast beef and corned beef goes by many names. This is one of many ways in which it's like the devil, and Sean Combs. People call it the Gym Shoe, the Jim Shoe or the Jim Shoo.

Ian: With a name this unappetizing, the sandwich had no choice but to be so delicious no one would mess with it. It's like A Boy Named Shoe.

Blythe: I thought I'd need my Reebok Stomach Pumps for this.

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All Tech Considered
11:31 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Crowdsourcing Ideas For A Better School

Crowdsourcing tools are giving teachers and school district employees more say on big decisions.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 6:28 pm

In my previous life as a high school English teacher, I often felt disconnected from everyone making the decisions that affected how I did my job. A new curriculum handed down from the district. Tutorials to learn how to process student data. Elective classes swapped out for study halls. I just learned to roll with the punches.

But crowdsourcing tools are slowly working their way into the education policy world, designed to give teachers and district employees more say on big decisions that affect their school environment.

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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Mon August 12, 2013

London Puts Stop To Sidewalk Bins That Track Cellphones

A promotional image from Renew shows one of its recycling/advertising kiosks in London. City officials asked the company to stop recording data about the phones of passing pedestrians.
Renew

Originally published on Mon August 12, 2013 11:37 am

The city of London has ordered a company to cease tracking the cellphones of pedestrians who pass its recycling bins, which also double as kiosks showing video advertisements. The bins logged data about any Wi-Fi-enabled device that passed within range.

The company, called Renew, recently added the tracking technology to about a dozen of the 100 bins it had installed before London hosted the 2012 Summer Olympics.

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Parallels
10:55 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Bangladesh Textile Exports Surge; Another Factory Worker Dies

A Bangladeshi woman cries on Aug. 2 at the site of Rana Plaza building collapse near Dhaka, Bangladesh. The building came crashing down in April, the worst tragedy in the history of the global garment industry.
A.M. Ahad AP

Two news items reminded us of the collapse in April of a building outside the Bangladeshi capital, Dhaka, that housed garment factories.

-- In the first, a worker injured in the collapse of the Rana Plaza died last week after spending 108 days in hospital in a coma.

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Author Interviews
10:50 am
Mon August 12, 2013

Behind 'The New Black': The Real Piper's Prison Story

Taylor Schilling plays Piper in Netflix's Orange Is the New Black, which is based on Piper Kerman's memoir of her year in prison.
Jessica Miglio Netflix

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 9:18 am

Piper Kerman was a 24-year-old Smith College graduate in 1993, when she flew to Belgium with a suitcase of money intended for a West African drug lord.

This misguided adventure started when she began a romantic relationship with a woman who was part of what Kerman describes as a "clique of impossibly stylish and cool lesbians in their mid-30s." That woman was involved in a drug-smuggling ring, and got Kerman involved, too, though Kerman left that life after several months.

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