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All Tech Considered
3:57 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Hard-Core And Casual Gamers Play In Different Worlds

Kelly Kelley, who goes by the gaming pseudonym MrsViolence, streams her play nightly for her many fans to watch.
Twitch.TV screenshot

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 4:49 pm

This holiday season, the video game industry is looking to reignite sales as two game titans, Sony and Microsoft, launch the next generation of game consoles.

Their target demographic is the group of dedicated players known as hard-core gamers. Dive into the wide world of video game culture on YouTube and you'll hear that term being thrown about.

So what exactly is a hard-core gamer?

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Shots - Health News
3:30 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

More Children Are Being Medicated For ADHD Than Before

iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 4:03 pm

The number of children being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is on the rise, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

And families increasingly are opting for medications to treat kids. Two-thirds of children with a current diagnosis are being medicated — a jump of 28 percent from 2007 to 2011.

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Business
3:27 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

JPMorgan Says It Broke No Law. So Why Pay The $13 Billion?

The U.S. government says JPMorgan Chase & Co. knowingly sold faulty mortgage-backed securities in the years leading up to the financial crisis. The bank says it's broken no laws.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 11:20 pm

State and federal regulators have hailed Tuesday's $13 billion settlement with JPMorgan Chase & Co. over faulty mortgage assets it sold in the years leading up to the financial crisis as a big victory for the judicial system.

But like other big settlements to emerge from the financial crisis, the deal leaves unclear just what the bank did wrong.

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The Two-Way
3:11 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Rate Of Coastal Wetlands Loss Has Sped Up, U.S. Study Says

Saltwater wetlands that include marshes and shoals on Virginia's Atlantic coast. U.S. coastal wetlands losses were 25 percent greater from 2004-2009, according to a recent federal study.
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:47 pm

The U.S. lost an average of 80,000 acres of coastal wetlands from 2004 to 2009, according to the latest data published by federal agencies. More than 70 percent of the estimated loss came in the Gulf of Mexico; nationwide, most of the loss was blamed on development that incurred on freshwater wetlands.

"The losses of these vital wetlands were 25 percent greater than during the previous six years," NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports for our Newscast unit. She also notes that the loss equals "about seven football fields every hour."

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Politics
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

White House Pushes Next Year's Health Plan Sign-Ups Later

Originally published on Sun November 24, 2013 4:32 pm

Another day brings another delay for the federal health law known as the Affordable Care Act.

On Friday, the Obama administration announced that, starting next year, it is pushing back the start of the sign-up period for those buying individual and small business insurance until mid-November, rather than mid-October. That will give insurance companies some extra time to set their premiums, given this year's difficulties.

And, as some analysts point out, the delay may also ease some political concerns for Democrats.

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Around the Nation
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

New York's Next Mayor Tries New Tactic To Get Feedback

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

New Yorkers have a new way to deliver messages to their newly elected mayor, Bill de Blasio. It's a tent, a huge, translucent one on Canal Street called The Talking Transition Tent. More than 11,000 people have wandered through it so far, and it's become a kind of 21st-century soapbox, as NPR's Margot Adler reports.

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Politics
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Week In Politics: Post-'Nuclear Option' Politics And JFK's Legacy

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's time to talk politics now with our Friday regulars, columnist E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and David Brooks of the New York Times who joins us this week from Stanford University. Welcome back to both of you.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be here.

DAVID BROOKS: Good to be here.

SIEGEL: Start with filibusters. You've heard Ailsa Chang's story. David, is today's level of cooperation in the Senate so paltry that the GOP threat of no more Mr. Nice Guy was worth the Democrats ignoring?

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Politics
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Senate Rules Change Could Mean More Political Rancor

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Is Washington headed for smoother operation or more dysfunction than ever? Democrats made big changes to the rules of the U.S. Senate yesterday. The changes kill the ability of the minority, the Republicans, to filibuster most presidential nominations.

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NPR Story
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Old Political Feud In Philippines Fuels Rage Over Typhoon Response

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

While international relief efforts in the Philippines are in high gear, efforts by the Philippine government have been hampered. There are bitter rivalries among the country's political clans. And two major political families - including that of the president - are sparring over the response to the disaster. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has that story.

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Asia
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Two Weeks After Typhoon, Philippines Sees Signs Of Normal Life

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

It's been two weeks since the typhoon devastated Tacloban city in the Philippines. Marine Brig. Gen. Paul Kennedy is in Tacloban overseeing U.S. military relief efforts in the Philippines, and he says the city is picking up the pieces, businesses are re-opening and he sees signs up hope in the residents. Kennedy gives Melissa Block an update on the state of affairs in the country.

Sports
3:01 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Heisman Front-Runner Under Investigation For Sexual Assault

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 8:52 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The University of Alabama football team is unbeaten, ranked number one and attempting to win a third straight national championship under head coach Nick Saban. Here to talk about the Crimson Tide's roll and other stories in college football is sportswriter Stefan Fatsis. Hiya, Stefan.

STEFAN FATSIS, BYLINE: Hey, Robert.

SIEGEL: Three national championships in a row, that would be something.

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All Tech Considered
2:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

To Test-Drive A Concept Car, Fire Up The PlayStation

Mercedes-Benz introduced its AMG Vision Gran Turismo concept vehicle at the Los Angeles Auto Show this week. This is just a model of the car; the fully functioning version is virtual.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

Drifting is one of those crazy things you should only do in a video game, but I got to experience it in real life at Willow Springs racetrack in the California desert with race car driver and expert drifter Dai Yoshihara.

Drifting, Yoshihara explains, is "a controlled slide through a series of corners at very high speed."

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It's All Politics
2:19 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

5 Ways JFK Still Influences Presidential Politics

Then-Sen. John F. Kennedy showed some of the charisma that powered his presidential bid as he greeted college students in Charleston, W.Va., in April 1960.
AP

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 4:06 pm

The 50th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's death in Dallas is a time when much attention is aptly focused on the abrupt and tragic end to his presidency.

But it's also a moment to consider the beginning of JFK's presidential story, since he redefined the art of campaigning for the White House.

Here are five ways Kennedy's influence is still being felt in presidential politics:

1. The Self-Selected Candidate

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Music
1:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Jazz Legend Sandoval: Music 'Keeps You Alive'

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now we take a moment to highlight and salute another artist. Jazz-great Arturo Sandoval received the Presidential Medal of Freedom this week from President Obama. Sandoval was born and raised in Cuba, where he was once jailed just for listening to jazz music. So he packed up his trumpet and moved to the United States. A country he says gave him the freedom to fill the air with his music. Here's what the president said about him at the ceremony.

(SOUNDBITE OF CEREMONY)

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World
1:24 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Do Sanctions Really Work?

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Celeste Headlee. Michel Martin is away. Coming up, we visit the Barbershop and ask the guys to reflect on the 50th anniversary of JFK's assassination in Dallas. That's in just a few minutes.

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The Salt
1:16 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Why Slather This Spinach Field In Poop? It's All For Science

University of California, Davis food safety field scientists Michele Jay-Russell, Paula Kahn-Rivadeneira, Anna Zwieniecka, Navreen Pandher and Peiman Aminabadi celebrate the first day of their experiment testing E. coli survival in soil.
Courtesy of Fhon Saharuetai

Originally published on Sat November 23, 2013 3:06 pm

Why are these scientists in hazmat suits smiling? They're standing in a field that they are about to spread with raw manure — four different kinds of raw manure, to be exact.

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The Two-Way
1:03 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

$1.1 Million Dune Buggy: Youabian Makes Splash At LA Car Show

The Youabian Puma has turned heads at the LA Auto Show, where attendees have been startled by its 20-foot length and unusual design.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:54 pm

Some cars are meant to be beautiful; some cars are meant to serve a purpose. The makers of the Youabian Puma say their car was created with one goal: "to stand out and be unique." And that's what they've done, as dozens of howling headlines attest.

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Interviews
12:36 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

Botched Investigation Fuels Kennedy Conspiracy Theories

This interview was originally broadcast on Oct. 28, 2013.

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The Salt
12:32 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

This Is What America's School Lunches Really Look Like

Courtesy of DoSomething.org

Originally published on Mon November 25, 2013 10:08 am

School lunch has never been the stuff of foodie dreams. I'm still haunted by the memory of my elementary school cafeteria's "brain pizza" – a lumpy oval thing topped with fleshy white strips of barely melted mozzarella that clumped together like neurons.

And it looks like America's school cafeterias are still turning out the culinary abominations, judging by the images on Fed Up, a fascinating online project showcasing school lunch photos submitted by students across the country.

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The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later
12:31 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

How Live TV Helped America Mourn The Loss Of JFK

During JFK's funeral, live TV coverage helped make John-John Kennedy's salute an indelible image of American history.
Keystone Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:50 pm

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Parallels
12:06 pm
Fri November 22, 2013

British Case Points To Hidden Nature Of Modern Slavery

A pedestrian walks along Lambeth Road in south London on Friday. Police have rescued three women from a home in the neighborhood. They were held hostage for some 30 years, according to authorities.
Andy Rain EPA/Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 1:40 pm

We told you last month about a report that estimated that nearly 30 million people live in slavery worldwide.

That report by the Walk Free Foundation said that India has the most slaves (between 13.3 million and 14.7 million people), while Britain is among the countries with the fewest.

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The Two-Way
11:48 am
Fri November 22, 2013

To The Tardis! There's A 'Whodle' Taking Over The Web!

Warning: You may find yourself in a time trap.
google.co.uk

On this eve of Doctor Who's 50th anniversary there's an alien force spreading across Google's platforms around the world.

If you're fan of the good Doctor, you may not be able to resist.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Norway's Magnus Carlsen Is New Chess World Champion

Norway's Magnus Carlsen smiles at a news conference after clinching the FIDE World Chess Championship Friday in Chennai, India, on Friday.
Babu Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:21 pm

In Norway, it's "Christmas Eve, New Year's Eve, all of the great days" rolled into one: That's because 22-year-old Magnus Carlsen has beaten the defending champion, India's Viswanathan Anand, to be crowned chess world champion.

The world No. 1's victory Friday over Anand, the world No. 8 and an Indian fan favorite, came after 10 games in Chennai, India. Carlsen won three and drew seven, and earned the highest rating of all time with the 6.5-3.5 win.

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The Two-Way
11:13 am
Fri November 22, 2013

2015 Health Insurance Deadline To Be Pushed Back One Month

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 6:56 pm

The Obama administration confirmed early Friday afternoon that starting next year, it plans to push back the start of enrollment for coverage under the new health care law by one month.

NPR's Julie Rovner tells us via Twitter that White House spokesman Jay Carney says the Department of Health and Human Services "has indicated its intent to shift the 2015 marketplace schedule by one month."

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Chemist Pleads Guilty In Massachusetts Crime Lab Scandal

Annie Dookhan, pictured earlier this year, pleaded guilty Friday to falsifying drugs tests at a Massachusetts state crime lab.
Steven Senne AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 5:36 pm

A former chemist for the state of Massachusetts' crime labs pleaded guilty Friday to falsifying drugs tests that potentially compromised tens of thousands of criminal cases. WBUR reports she admitted all 27 counts against her.

Update at 4:40 p.m. ET: Prison Sentence Of 3-5 Years

Judge Carol Ball sentenced Annie Dookhan, 36, to three to five years in prison, plus a probation period. Prosecutors had requested a sentence of from five to seven years in prison.

Our original post continues:

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Space
11:06 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Budget Cuts Leave Curiosity and Cassini in Limbo

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: Touchdown confirmed. We're safe on Mars.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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History
11:05 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Using Modern Ballistics to Crack 'Cold Case JFK'

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Ira Flatow. Those of us of a certain age can remember exactly what we were doing on a Friday this hour 50 years ago when we heard the news. President Kennedy's assassination horrified and transfixed the nation. It was murder in plain sight, seemingly the easiest kind of crime to solve. But 50 years later the basic facts of the case are still debated.

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The Two-Way
10:28 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Pakistani Who Helped Hunt Bin Laden Is Charged With Murder

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, in 2010, who has faced legal troubles since he took DNA samples that helped prove Osama bin Laden was in Abbottabad.
Qazi Rauf AP

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 11:42 am

Pakistani doctor Shakil Afridi, who assisted U.S. intelligence agents trying to zero in on Osama bin Laden, has been charged with murder in a case stemming from a patient's death.

Afridi's lawyer, Samiullah Afridi, said he was informed about the charges Friday, and that a trial is scheduled for next month, Reuters reports.

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Music Interviews
10:26 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Esperanza Spalding: Guantanamo Doesn't Represent 'Our America'

Grammy Award-winner Esperanza Spalding in her video 'We Are America."
ESPLLC

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 1:24 pm

Grammy Award-winning musician Esperanza Spalding has a problem with using the phrase "protest song" to describe her new recording, "We Are America." The song, along with its accompanying music video, demands congressional action to close the detention center at Guantanamo Bay.

" 'Protest' doesn't seem accurate to me," she tells NPR's Celeste Headlee. "We weren't thinking of a 'protest' song, we're thinking of a 'let's get together and do something pro-active, creative and productive' song."

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All Tech Considered
10:05 am
Fri November 22, 2013

Tech Week That Was: Video Gaming, Bitcoin And Landlines

There's a growing market for digital currencies like Bitcoin. A Sydney pub, seen here, is taking Bitcoins as payment for drinks.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Wow, suddenly we're at the end of the week already. If you missed the conversations about digital life and technology in the headlines and on NPR, here's a look back.

ICYMI

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