NPR News

Pages

Shots - Health News
9:20 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Your Roommate In The Nursing Home Might Be A Bedbug

Hospitals seem to be doing a better job than nursing homes of keeping bedbugs at bay.
iStockphoto

If you're in the hospital or a nursing home, the last thing you want to be dealing with is bedbugs. But exterminators saying they're getting more and more calls for bedbug infestations in nursing homes, hospitals and doctor's offices.

Read more
Shots - Health News
8:46 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Covered California Votes To Cap What Patients Pay For Pricey Drugs

Retired California school teacher Mikkel Lawrence sits with his cat, Max. Lawrence has hepatitis C and has struggled to afford the medicine he needs to treat it.
April Dembosky KQED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 10:01 am

In recent years, expensive specialty medicines used to treat cancer and chronic illnesses have forced some very ill Americans to choose between getting proper treatment and paying their rent.

To ease the financial burden, the California agency that governs the state's Obamacare plans issued landmark rules Thursday that will put a lid on the amount anyone enrolled in one of those plans can be charged each month for high-end medicine.

Read more
Parallels
7:33 am
Fri May 22, 2015

A Wedding And A Challenge: Lebanese Couples Fight For Civil Marriage

Kholoud Succariyeh (right) and Nidal Darwish, who got married in defiance of Lebanon's ban on civil unions, walk past Beirut's landmark Pigeon Rock in 2013.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 23, 2015 9:52 am

Like lots of young married couples, Kholoud Succariyeh and Nidal Darwish love to show their wedding video. They go all misty-eyed remembering that day two years ago.

"Very beautiful," says Succariyeh. "Everything is nice."

Their wedding was special, not only as a personal milestone for the couple. It was a political milestone, as well.

Darwish says their union was a challenge to the state: It was Lebanon's first civil marriage.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:04 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Pipeline Operator: Possibly Months To Determine Cause Of Calif. Spill

A bird covered in oil flaps its wings at Refugio State Beach, north of Goleta, Calif., on Thursday. More than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed and vacuumed from a spill that stretched across 9 miles of California coast, just a fraction of the sticky, stinking goo that escaped from a broken pipeline, officials said.
Jae C. Hong AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:35 pm

It could be months before investigators can determine what caused a pipeline leak that has fouled a stretch of coast in Southern California, the company that operates the oil conduit says.

Since the leak was discovered earlier this week, more than 9,000 gallons of oil have been raked, skimmed or vacuumed from a 9-mile stretch of California shoreline near Santa Barbara, officials say.

"We have not even uncovered the pipe yet," said Patrick Hodgins, senior director of safety for Texas-based Plains All American, according to The Associated Press.

The AP reports:

Read more
TED Radio Hour
6:34 am
Fri May 22, 2015

What Are The Secrets of Centenarians?

National Geographic writer and explorer Dan Buettner studies the world's longest-lived peoples and their lifestyles.
Courtesy TEDxTC

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:45 am

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Dan Buettner's TED Talk

To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner studies the world's "Blue Zones," communities whose elders live longer than anyone else on the planet.

About Dan Buettner

Read more
TED Radio Hour
6:26 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Can Aging Be Cured?

"Things that only have a 50% chance of happening 20 years from now are supposed to sound like science fiction." - Aubrey de Grey
Robert Leslie TED

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 7:01 am

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Fountain Of Youth

About Aubrey de Grey's TED Talk

Cambridge researcher Aubrey de Grey argues that aging is merely a disease — and a curable one at that.

About Aubrey de Grey

Read more
The Two-Way
6:20 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Islamic State Reportedly Seizes Last Syria-Iraq Border Crossing

In this photo released Thursday by a website run by Islamic State militants, damaged Syrian helicopters sit at Palmyra air base, which was captured by ISIS after a battle with the Syrian government forces earlier this week.
Uncredited AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 12:02 pm

Fighters with the self-declared Islamic State have seized the last border crossing in Syria, where they control half of the country, according to a British-based monitoring group.

Syrian government forces withdrew from al-Tanf, known as al-Waleed in Iraq, according to the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The border crossing lies at the extreme northwest of Iraq's border with Syria.

Read more
All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

All Songs +1: 'Epic' Jazz From Kamasi Washington

Kamasi Washington's appropriately-named new album, The Epic, is out now.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 8:37 am

Even if you don't know anything about jazz, it's quite possible you've heard the music of saxophonist Kamasi Washington: That's him on the latest albums by Kendrick Lamar and Flying Lotus. But that's only the very tip of his iceberg.

Read more
All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Drum Fill Friday, With Sō Percussion

The members of Sō Percussion will bang on almost anything.
Janette Beckman

May is international drum month! To celebrate, we bring you a discussion in percussion with a group of guys who will bang on almost anything (including a cactus). The members of Sō Percussion are the guest quizmasters for this week's Drum Fill Friday.

Read more
NPR Ed
6:03 am
Fri May 22, 2015

An Irreplaceable Replacement, This Sub Gets The Job Done

Substitute teacher Josephine Brewington receives the substitute teacher of the year award.
Courtesy of Kelly Services

One of the toughest jobs in education is the substitute teacher. The pay is low, schedules are unpredictable and respect can be hard to come by. But because the average teacher missed 11 days of school in 2012-2013, a sub like Josephine Brewington ends up playing a crucial role.

And this week — Brewington was rewarded for her efforts — winning the 2015 Substitute Teacher of the Year award.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:39 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Irish Voters Decide Whether To Legalize Same-Sex Marriage

Nuns vote on a referendum to legalize same-sex marriage, at a polling station in County Dublin, Ireland, on Friday.
Peter Morrison AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 12:08 pm

Voters in Ireland are deciding whether the country will amend its constitution to make same-sex marriage legal.

The vote on Friday follows months of debate in the heavily Catholic country. Opinion polls suggest the referendum will pass and Ireland will become the first country in the world to legalize same-sex marriage in a national vote.

But, as NPR's Ari Shapiro points out, "Polls in this part of the world have been totally wrong in the past.

Read more
Goats and Soda
5:36 am
Fri May 22, 2015

How Do You Motivate Kids To Stop Skipping School?

Hanna Barczyk for NPR

It seems like a no-brainer: Offer kids a reward for showing up at school, and their attendance will shoot up. But a recent study of third-graders in a slum in India suggests that incentive schemes can do more harm than good.

Read more
Animals
5:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Stuffed Tiger, Camera-Stealing Elephant Get Attention

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Television
5:32 am
Fri May 22, 2015

CBS Trashes David Letterman's 'Late Show' Set

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
NPR Story
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

State Department Envoy Defends Administration's Efforts Against ISIS

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Boy Scouts' National President Says It's Time To Accept Gay Adult Leaders

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 4:08 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And the head of the Boy Scouts of America is calling on the organization to drop its ban on gay adult leaders.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Read more
Race
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Players' Costs May Be A Factor In Why Tennis Leads Golf In Diversity

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Read more
Around the Nation
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Poor Residents Benefit From Oklahoma County's Medicine Recycling

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Middle East
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Talking To Qatar's World Cup Workers Gets BBC Reporter Arrested

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 1:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
Middle East
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Visting Georgetown Professor Among Those Egypt Sentences To Death

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Business
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Mechanical Turk Workers: Secret Cogs In The Internet Marketplace

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Politics
3:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Congressional Stalemate Threatens To Kill Phone Data Program

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
2:01 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Korean Air 'Nut Rage' Executive Freed From Prison

Former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-Ah, after being released by a Seoul appeals court.
Jung Yeon-je AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 12:50 pm

Former Korean Air executive Cho Hyun-ah, or Heather Cho, is out of prison after a four-month stay. If her name and alias don't ring a bell for you, the reason why she was jailed might.

Read more
Book Reviews
1:59 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Beyond The Best-Sellers: Nancy Pearl Recommends Under-The-Radar Reads

Librarian Nancy Pearl shares her selections of under-the-radar books that you may have missed.
Emily Bogle NPR

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 9:11 am

Every once in a while, NPR's go-to books guru Nancy Pearl sends Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep a tall stack of books. They're generally "under-the-radar" reads — titles she thinks deserve more attention than they've been getting.

"I just think that it's so important that readers learn about books that haven't been heavily promoted – what we would call mid-list books," Pearl says.

Here are some of her fiction picks, to kick off your summer reading list:

Read more
Heroin In The Heartland
1:57 am
Fri May 22, 2015

In America's Heartland, Heroin Crisis Is Hitting Too Close To Home

Sabas Sanchez Jr. was better known among his neighbors in Madison, Neb., as "Gordo" — Spanish for chubby. He also had an oversized personality. His father keeps this tattered photo in his wallet.
Bobby Caina Calvan Heartland Reporting Project

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 11:52 am

Heroin, today, is killing more and more people in rural America.

One Mexican cartel has seeded low-cost heroin around rural towns in the Southwest and Midwest, selling it cheap and easy, almost like pizza.

Madison, Neb. — population 2,500 — is just a speck of a town, a two-hour drive from the big-city bustle of Omaha. But it's not far enough away to avoid the growing impact of heroin.

"The world's gotten smaller," says Police Chief Rod Waterbury. "If drugs can make it to Chicago, they can make it here."

Read more
The Salt
1:55 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Revealed: The Ocean's Tiniest Life At The Bottom Of The Food Chain

Plankton collected in the Pacific Ocean with a 0.1mm mesh net. Seen here is a mix of multicellular organisms — small zooplanktonic animals, larvae and single protists (diatoms, dinoflagellates, radiolarians) — the nearly invisible universe at the bottom of the marine food chain.
Christian Sardet/CNRS/Tara Expeditions

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 3:54 pm

What's at the bottom of the bottom of the food chain? Well, think small ... smaller than you can see.

Tiny life forms in the ocean, too small for the naked eye to see.

There are (and scientists have done the math) trillions of microorganisms in the ocean: plankton, bacteria, krill (they're maybe bigger than "micro," but not by much), viruses, protists and archaea (they're like bacteria, but they aren't bacteria).

Read more
The Two-Way
1:51 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Uneasy Rider: The Origins Of Motorcycle Gangs And How They Remain A Force

Police officers observe the scene at Twin Peaks restaurant in Waco, Texas, the site of the recent motorcycle gang-related shooting.
Jerry Larson AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 9:52 am

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

The shootout involving motorcycle gangs last weekend in Waco, Texas, resulted in 170 arrests and put a spotlight on the gangs' history, which dates back to the 1940s.

Read more
The Salt
1:50 am
Fri May 22, 2015

Adios, Trans Fats: FDA Poised To Phase Out Artery-Clogging Fat

Various food items that contained trans fats in November 2013. That month, the Food and Drug Administration first announced plans to ban partially hydrogenated vegetable oils from all food products. A final rule is expected any day now.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:32 am

The case against trans fats is not new. For years, health experts have been telling us to avoid them.

And as retailing behemoths such as Wal-Mart have committed to the removal of all remaining, industrially produced trans fats in the products they sell, the food industry has stepped up its pace to reformulate its offerings.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:11 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

Millions Of Dollars In Speech Fees Support Clinton Foundation

Former President Bill Clinton speaks earlier this month at a conference in Marrakesh, Morocco, sponsored by the Clinton Foundation.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Originally published on Fri May 22, 2015 5:17 am

Hillary, Bill and Chelsea Clinton brought in millions of dollars for their charitable foundation through paid speeches. They gave the honorarium to the organization. This is the latest release of information about the foundation's funding, as a result of Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign.

Last week, the campaign filed a financial disclosure showing that since January of 2014, Bill and Hillary Clinton made more than $25 million dollars in paid speeches. Thursday's release from the Clinton Foundation begins to complete the picture.

Read more

Pages