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Shots - Health News
1:45 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Sweet Cigarillos And Cigars Lure Youths To Tobacco, Critics Say

Candy-flavored cigars like these in a shop in Albany, N.Y., are the focus of efforts to restrict sales of sweet-flavored tobacco.
Hans Pennink Associated Press

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 12:56 pm

The good news: Cigarette sales are down by about a third over the past decade. Not so for little cigars and cigarillos. Their sales more than doubled over the same time period, in large part owing to the growing popularity of these little cigars among teenagers and 20-somethings.

The appeal among young people has lots to do with the large variety of candylike flavors in the little cigars, according to Jennifer Cantrell, director of research and evaluation at the anti-tobacco Legacy Foundation.

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It's All Politics
1:43 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In Arkansas, The Senate Battle Is Already Brutal

Sen. Mark Pryor, D-Ark., speaks at the Rice Expo in Stuttgart, Ark., on Aug. 2.
Danny Johnston AP

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 3:03 am

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The Salt
1:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

In the Beginning, There Were ... Dumplings?

A potsticker prepared by Chef Scott Drewno at the Washington, D.C., restaurant The Source.
Heather Rousseau for NPR

Originally published on Tue August 27, 2013 7:35 am

From Warsaw to Wuhan, people around the world love dumplings. They're tasty little packages that can be made of any grain and stuffed with whatever the locals crave. But where did they come from?

No one knows for sure, but Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, Calif., thinks dumplings have been around for a very long time. "Almost without doubt, there are prehistoric dumplings," he says.

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Shots - Health News
1:42 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Kids With Costly Medical Issues Get Help, But Not Enough

Katie Doderer, with dad Mark, big sister Emily, and mom Marcy, has a rare medical condition that requires 24-hour use of a ventilator.
courtesy of the Doderer family

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:56 am

Katie Doderer is a very poised 15-year-old with short blond hair and a wide smile. She's a straight A student who loves singing, dancing and performing in musicals.

This could be considered something of a miracle.

"I have a complex medical condition known as congenital central hypoventilation – blah—syndrome. CCHS," Katie explains, stumbling on the full name of her malady. "Basically my brain doesn't tell me to breathe. So I am reliant on a mechanical ventilator."

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The March On Washington At 50
1:40 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Two Officers, Black And White, On Walking The '63 March Beat

Joseph Burden (third row, third from right) with his graduating class at Washington, D.C.'s Metropolitan Police Department training academy in 1960. Every officer on the force was required to work the day of the March on Washington.
Courtesy of Joseph Burden

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 7:58 am

For the month of August, Morning Edition and The Race Card Project are looking back at a seminal moment in civil rights history: the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, where the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream Speech" Aug. 28, 1963. Approximately 250,000 people descended on the nation's capital from all over the country for the mass demonstration.

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The Two-Way
12:53 am
Mon August 26, 2013

Pain, Loss And Tears Come With Medal Of Honor

U.S. Army Staff Sergeant Ty Michael Carter near Dahla Dam, Afghanistan in July 2012.
Ho/AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 2:04 pm

Update at 3:14 p.m. ET. Carter Receives Medal Of Honor:

Saying he represented "the essence of true heroism," President Obama presented Army Staff Sgt. Ty Michael Carter with the nation's highest military honors, this afternoon.

"As these soldiers and families will tell you, they're a family forged in battle, and loss, and love," Obama said, according to the AP.

Our Original Post Continues:

The Army staff sergeant who Monday afternoon will receive the Medal of Honor at a White House ceremony has mixed emotions.

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Sports
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Quitting Your Job For Fantasy Football

Fantasy sports attract an estimated 36+ million players in the U.S. and Canada.
istockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 4:04 pm

You may just call it late summer; for many die-hard sports fans, it's called fantasy football drafting season.

Fantasy sports is a huge business, with an estimated 36 million people in the U.S. and Canada picking teams and talkin' trash, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.

And now we may be at a tipping point.

One man - Drew Dinkmeyer - actually left his job as an investment analyst to play fantasy sports full-time.

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Middle East
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

World Reacts To Alleged Syrian Chemical Attack

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Jacki Lyden.

Coming up, a look at the minority Christian population in the Middle East. But first, this week, video out of Syria showed shocking images of civilians, many of them women and children, choking and convulsing on the floor of a hospital near Damascus. The opposition called it the evidence of a chemical attack.

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Around the Nation
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

The Howl Of The Eastern Timber Wolf

Transcript

JACKI LYDEN, HOST:

It's August, and that means a lot of us are looking for something out of the ordinary to do. And every August for the past 50 years, people from all around the world have made the journey to Algonquin Provincial Park in Ontario to hear the howl of the eastern timber wolf, once a ubiquitous sound in the wild. Reporter Natasha Haverty sends this postcard.

RICK STRONKS: OK. How many people are here from outside Canada and the U.S.? Look at that. Amazing.

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Music Interviews
3:08 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Julia Holter's 'Loud City Song' Is A Story On Top Of A Story

Julia Holter's latest album is titled Loud City Song.
Rick Bahto Courtesy of the artist

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Middle East
3:01 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

For Arab World's Christians, An Uncertain Fate

The Amir Tadros Coptic Church in Minya, Egypt, was set ablaze on Aug. 14.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 3:16 pm

As Egypt plunges into unrest amid the military-backed government's crackdown on demonstrators, the country's Christian minority has been targeted by Islamic extremists.

Dozens of churches have been burned, ransacked and looted since the government began fighting against supporters of the Muslim Brotherhood and ousted President Mohammed Morsi two weeks ago.

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Books
2:52 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

'Heart' Of Iranian Identity Reimagined For A New Generation

In "The Nightmare of Siavosh," the young exiled Iranian prince dreams of his impending demise. Upon waking, he tells his wife, Farigis, about his fears regarding the tragic events to come.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 5:14 am

A thousand years ago, a Persian poet named Abolqasem Ferdowsi of Tous obtained a royal commission to put the ancient legends and myths of Iran into a book of verse.

He called this epic Shahnameh, or "Epic of the Persian Kings." It took him more than three decades and comprises 60,000 couplets — twice the length of The Iliad and The Odyssey combined.

Author Azar Nafisi, who wrote the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran, says the importance of this foundational myth epic to Iranians can't really be overstated.

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

If You Believe The Farmer's Almanac, Get A Good Coat

Snow sticks to the trees along Levee Road during a winter storm in December of 2012 in Baraboo, Wisconsin.
Tom Lynn Getty Images

If you believe The Farmer's Almanac, this upcoming winter is going to be pretty brutal for most of the country.

This is how Caleb Weatherbee, the pseudonym of the 197-year-old publication's official forecaster, put it in a piece today, announcing the new forecast:

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Sun August 25, 2013

Ginsburg Says She Plans To Stay On High Court No Matter The President

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in October of 2010.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

In a rare interview, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg says she plans to stay on the court, no matter who is president.

Ginsburg, 80 and the leader of the court's liberal wing, spoke to The New York Times at length on Friday. The whole piece is a worth a read, but here two highlights.

On her potential retirement, she said:

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Sun August 25, 2013

New York A.G. Sues Donald Trump Over 'Unlicensed' University

Donald Trump, chairman and president of the Trump Organization and founder of Trump Entertainment Resorts, delivers remarks during the second day of the 40th annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in March.
Alex Wong Getty Images

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is suing Donald Trump's for-profit investment school, "Trump University," which the lawsuit claims operated as an unlicensed educational institution for about six years and was essentially an "elaborate bait-and-switch" operation.

The New York Times reports:

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Ecstatic Voices
10:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Atheists Take Old Hymns Out Of The Chapel And Into The Streets

The Renaissance Street Singers give a performance at the Winterdale Arch, near the West 81st Street gate in Central Park.
Joel Rose NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 8:16 am

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The Two-Way
8:01 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Wildfire Near Yosemite Spreads, Threatens Ancient Trees

A firefighter uses a hose to douse the flames of the Rim Fire on Saturday near Groveland, California.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

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Middle East
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Evidence Points To Chemical Weapon Use In Syria

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

You heard him mention his concerns about a possible chemical weapons attack last week outside Damascus. U.N. inspectors are being allowed to visit the sites in question tomorrow. Gary Samore worked in the Obama White House as the coordinator for arms control and weapons of mass destruction. He explains that once inspectors arrive on site, they'll work to figure out what substance was used.

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Middle East
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Tens Of Thousands Flee Syria After Alleged Chemical Attacks

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Thousands of Syrian refugees entered Iraq last week, fleeing the violence between extremist groups and Kurdish militias in northeastern Syria. Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin speaks with Alan Paul of the charity Save the Children about the flow of refugees entering Iraq.

Around the Nation
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Longest Mail Route In The Country

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to leave you today with an image: a long road, an open sky and a guy in a truck with a mission. This past week, a story caught our eye. Seventy-two-year-old Jim Ed Bull has what the postal service says is the longest postal delivery route in the country. Five days a week, Bull delivers mail along 187.6 miles of road in rural Oklahoma. We called Mr. Bull up to see what those long drives are like.

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Law
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Justice Department Gets Aggressive On Voting Rights

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

One of the central achievements of the civil rights movement was the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which protected minority voters. This summer, the U.S. Supreme Court threw out a key section of the landmark law. After that decision, Texas, along with other states, moved to impose new voting restrictions.

The U.S. Justice Department says those changes are discriminatory. And this past week, the department filed suit against the State of Texas.

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Race
6:04 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Thousands Gather To Mark '63 Civil Rights March

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin.

Tens of thousands of people from across the country came to the National Mall yesterday to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. At that historic march, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered one of the most iconic speeches in American history.

CROWD: Yeah.

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Race
5:57 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Ancient African Religion Finds Roots In America

Priest Ifagbemi has an elaborate shrine to Yoruba's gods in his home near Seattle.
Christopher Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 11:05 am

In the suburbs of Seattle, an ancient West-African religion is gaining followers. Yoruba, from the Yoruba people of Nigeria, has been spreading across the U.S. for the last 50 years.

The religion is particularly popular with African-Americans who find it offers a spiritual path and a deep sense of cultural belonging.

Looking For Answers

Wesley Hurt's Yoruba story begins the night he met his wife, Cheri Profit. It was nearly eight years ago, not long after a tour in Iraq. He had just gotten off for weekend release from an Army base in Tacoma, Wash.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Syria Will Allow U.N. To Inspect Chemical Weapons Claims

In this photo taken on a government organized media tour, a Syrian army soldier walks on a street in the Jobar neighborhood of Damascus, Syria, on Saturday.
AP

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 6:38 pm

This post was last updated at 8:36 p.m. ET. (For the latest updates click here.)

The United Nations says it is sending inspectors to the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack in Damascus, Syria.

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PG-13: Risky Reads
5:03 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Braving Both Napoleonic France And Teenage Angst With Aplomb

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 8:57 am

Fiona Maazel's latest novel is Woke Up Lonely.

The way my mom likes to tell it, I wasn't much of a reader growing up. My chief complaint of every book she dumped in my lap was that nothing happens. Ten pages in and no one had died.

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Author Interviews
3:19 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Haitian Youth Illuminated In 'Sea Light'

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

On her 7th birthday, a little girl named Claire disappears in a seaside Haitian village. Through Claire's fictional journey, award-winning author Edwidge Danticat shares glimmers of her own childhood in Haiti.

In Claire of the Sea Light, the protagonist's mother died during childbirth, and her father is a poor fisherman, struggling to make ends meet. Just moments before his daughter disappears, Claire's father had agreed to let a local woman adopt her in hopes of giving his daughter a better life.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:18 am
Sun August 25, 2013

It's All Greek To Me

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun August 25, 2013 9:22 am

On-air challenge: You're given some sentences. Each sentence conceals the name of a language in consecutive letters. Name the language. Each answer has five or more letters.

Last week's challenge: The Roman numeral for 38 is XXXVIII. What is special or unusual about this Roman numeral that sets it apart from every other Roman numeral that can be written?

Answer: If every possible Roman numeral were listed in alphabetical order, XXXVIII would be last.

Winner: Joseph Kuperberg of Pittsford, N.Y.

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Shots - Health News
3:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

The Same Tents That Seal Storms Out Can Seal Carbon Monoxide In

Headlamps make cold nights cozier, but leave the fuel-burning lanterns and stoves outside.
Gopal Vijayaraghavan Flickr

Originally published on Wed August 28, 2013 6:31 am

Staying snug within a watertight tent as a storm rages around you is one of the joys of modern camping and modern tents.

But if the weather suddenly turns nasty on your next camping trip, or nights are just colder than you expected, don't be tempted to bring your cook stove inside. Levels of poisonous carbon monoxide (CO) from the burning stove can build up fast.

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The Salt
3:17 am
Sun August 25, 2013

Dishwasher Cooking: Make Your Dinner While Cleaning The Plates

Food writer Dan Pashman says poached pears are great in the dishwasher. We're not sure about the asparagus, but we'll let you know after the cycle finishes.
Maggie Starbard NPR

Originally published on Mon August 26, 2013 12:10 pm

My mom is a creative cook. And a darn good one at that.

But when she told me and my sister — way back in 1995 — that she had started cooking salmon in the dishwasher, we just rolled our eyes and shook our heads. Here comes a kitchen catastrophe.

An hour later, mom proved her teenage daughters wrong once again. The salmon was tender, moist and super flavorful. In some ways, it was better than her fish cooked in the oven.

Flash-forward 18 years, and dishwasher cuisine seems to be making a comeback.

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It's All Politics
3:16 am
Sun August 25, 2013

A Guide To The Nation's Most Vulnerable Governors

Gov. Tom Corbett addresses a joint session of the Pennsylvania House and Senate on Feb. 5 in Harrisburg.
Matt Rourke AP

If you're looking for the most interesting gubernatorial races to watch in the coming year, the nation's biggest states are a good place to start.

Democrats Jerry Brown and Andrew Cuomo look like safe bets for re-election in California and New York, respectively. And, despite the pending retirement of Rick Perry, Republicans are confident of maintaining their hold on the governor's mansion in Texas.

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