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5:03 am
Wed November 27, 2013

A Travel Writer, Lost In An Undiscovered Country In 'Land Across'

iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:55 am

Imaginary countries, from Swift's Laputa to the far lands in the works of Borges and Ursula K. Le Guin, countries we'd do better to just enjoy than try to find on a map — these strike us as mostly places it's better to visit than to live in.

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Around the Nation
4:58 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Americans Asked To Chose National Thanksgiving Turkey

It seems like the White House was hosting a Thanksgiving Hunger Games. Americans were asked to decide which turkey tribute, Caramel or Popcorn, will be the National Thanksgiving Turkey.

The Two-Way
4:44 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Three Words For Getaway Day: Soggy, Sloppy And Snowy

Passengers wait for a BoltBus to arrive during a light rain, Wednesday, Nov. 27 in New York. A wall of storms packing ice, sleet and rain could upend holiday travel plans as millions of Americans take to the roads, skies and rails for Thanksgiving.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 11:21 am

While those in the western half of the nation will mostly enjoy fair skies on this Thanksgiving Eve, we regret to repeat that for millions of Americans east of the Mississippi it's going to be a messy busiest-travel-day-of-the-year (otherwise known as Getaway Day).

Here's what the National Weather Service has to say:

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Asia
3:24 am
Wed November 27, 2013

China, Japan Ramp Up Airspace Dispute

China announced over the weekend that it had expanded an air-defense zone to cover islands that are claimed by both it and Japan. The U.S., Japan and others said they wouldn't recognize that new zone. The U.S. has since flown two bomber jets through the space without notifying China.

Africa
3:20 am
Wed November 27, 2013

In Kenya, Corruption Is Widely Seen, Rarely Punished

Video footage shows what appears to be Kenyan soldiers carrying plastic shopping bags as they leave a supermarket at Westgate Mall during a terrorist attack in Nairobi on Sept. 21. Kenya's security forces have long been rated as among the most corrupt institutions in the country, but even jaded Kenyans were shocked by the CCTV footage.
Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 11:20 am

Editor's Note: One out of three Africans paid a bribe in the past year to obtain a government document, get medical care, place kids in school or settle an issue with police, according to a recent survey. Police consistently attracted the highest ratings of corruption, including those in Kenya. NPR's Gregory Warner looks at the impact it has on the country.

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Planet Money
3:19 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Ohio Hospital Puts Docs On The Spot To Lower Costs

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 11:57 am

An aspect of the Affordable Care Act is meant to rein in exploding health care costs. To do that, the law has created hundreds of experiments in which hospitals have volunteered to participate. Our Planet Money team went to one hospital in Ohio that's trying to get doctors more involved in understanding hospital economics.

Politics
3:15 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Medicaid Drives Expansion Of Health Care Coverage

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 4:45 am

After years of wide spread fretting about the size of the federal debt and angst about new federal regulations for health care, one federal program is enjoying widespread popularity: Medicaid. Morning Edition examines this political paradox.

Politics
3:15 am
Wed November 27, 2013

IRS Suggests Guidelines On Politicking By Tax-Exempt Groups

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 4:42 am

The Obama administration is pushing a new set of regulations that would make it much harder for so-called "social welfare" organizations to engage in political campaigns. This comes after a summer of controversy over the way the IRS treated Tea Party groups applying for tax exempt status.

Business
3:15 am
Wed November 27, 2013

The Last Word In Business

David Greene and Linda Wertheimer have the Last Word in business.

Latin America
3:15 am
Wed November 27, 2013

President-Elect Aims To Deploy Honduran Army To Fight Crime

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 4:48 am

The crime, poverty and unemployment rates have increased in Honduras under outgoing President Porfirio Lobo of the conservative National Party. But voters have chosen to keep the party in power by electing Juan Orlando-Hernandez. Linda Wertheimer talks to Tracy Wilkinson, the Mexico bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times, about the election.

Energy
3:03 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Drilling For Oil, Based On The Bible: Do Oil And Religion Mix?

John Brown, the head of Zion Oil & Gas, believes the Bible will help him find oil in Israel. The company, which is listed on Nasdaq, has so far spent $130 million and drilled four dry holes. Brown is shown here at one of the company's drilling rigs in Israel.
Courtesy of Zion Oil

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:44 am

They say an oilman has to be a gambler, but can he be a prophet?

Zion Oil & Gas, based in Dallas, is a publicly traded company that believes it is commanded by the Bible to search for oil in Israel, both to help the Holy Land and make money for investors. The 22 employees of Zion Oil in Texas and Israel, and many of its 30,000 investors, believe the company is on a mission from God.

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Business
3:03 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Men's Wearhouse Goes 'Pac-Man' On Joseph A. Bank

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 3:25 am

The retail company Men's Wearhouse has announced it is launching a takeover battle for rival Joseph A. Bank. What makes the effort unusual is that just last month Joseph A. Bank was trying to take over Men's Wearhouse. The turnaround is an example of what Wall Street calls a Pac-Man defense.

NPR Story
3:03 am
Wed November 27, 2013

It Still Isn't Easy, But Independent Bookstores Are Doing Better

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 1:36 pm

With another holiday shopping season on the horizon, one group of retailers is doing better than you might expect. Despite intense competition from Amazon and big box retailers, independent bookstores are enjoying a bit of a renaissance.

Robert Sindelar, managing partner at Third Place Books in Seattle, says for a couple of decades independent booksellers have been fighting an uphill battle, but now things are finally improving.

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Around the Nation
1:27 am
Wed November 27, 2013

More Girls Target Archery, Inspired By 'The Hunger Games'

Y'Jazzmin Christopher, 7, takes up target practice at Archery in the Wild in Longmont, Colo. "She used to be a really shy person, but now she's opening socially," says Alicia Christopher, Y'Jazzmin's mom, about her daughter's archery.
Grace Hood KUNC

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 10:32 am

The indoor shooting range at Archery in the Wild in northern Colorado used to be dominated by camouflage and hunters. But on this Saturday morning, the archery range is dotted with ponytails and 7-year-old girls like Y'Jazzmin Christopher.

The popularity of The Hunger Games series is fueling an interest in the sport of archery, particularly among girls. Some sporting equipment outfitters say they've seen a big boost in bow and arrow sales since the film series began in 2012.

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Food
1:26 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Squash Your Thanksgiving With Tips From The Test Kitchen

Joe Keller Courtesy America's Test Kitchen

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 11:23 am

Squash is the ultimate Thanksgiving food, not turkey. So says Chris Kimball, host of the PBS show America's Test Kitchen.

"Of all the things they served in that first Thanksgiving, there might not have been turkey," Kimball says. Early revelers may have dined on small birds or venison. "The one thing we know they did have was squash. So, if you want to go back to the first Thanksgiving, this is the item to start with."

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Sweetness And Light
1:25 am
Wed November 27, 2013

The Horse Who Picked Up A Paintbrush

Metro Meteor, a retired racehorse, stands with owners Ron and Wendy Krajewski and one of his paintings at Motters Station Stables in Rocky Ridge, Md., earlier this year.
Jeffrey B. Roth Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 8:55 am

This is a Thanksgiving story about a horse. Actually, a horse artist. I don't mean an artist who paints horses, like Degas or Remington, but a horse who paints — and thereby also raises money for less fortunate horses.

Really.

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Business
1:24 am
Wed November 27, 2013

How Shopping Malls Are Adapting In An Online World

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 9:49 am

Traditional shopping malls took a big hit after the economic collapse. Problems at big retailers Sears and J.C. Penney — two of the biggest mall tenants — could signal even more troubles.

But malls are trying to adapt. As online shopping grows, things are getting more and more competitive out in the real world of brick-and-mortar retail.

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The Salt
1:23 am
Wed November 27, 2013

After Years Of Pasta, Rice Returns To A Filipino Family Kitchen

Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil with her grandmother, who taught her to make the Filipino dish lumpia, in 2009.
Courtesy of Melanie Vanderlipe Ramil

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 9:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris dips into those stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

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Parallels
1:21 am
Wed November 27, 2013

Israel Dreams Of A Future As An Oil Producer

Givot Olam CEO Tovia Luskin expects to drill 40 wells and build a pipeline to a refinery on the coast. The company already has "proven and probable" reserves of 12.5 million barrels of oil. Luskin chose where to drill based on a passage from the Bible.
Emily Harris/ NPR

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 6:51 am

There's an old joke that if Moses had turned right when he led Jewish tribes out of Egypt, Israel might be where Saudi Arabia is today — and be rich from oil. Consultant Amit Mor of Eco Energy says that joke is out of date.

"Israel has more oil than Saudi Arabia," he claims. "And it's not a joke."

But that oil will be difficult to reach, if it can be recovered at all. The oil he's talking about is not yet liquid but is trapped in rocks underground.

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Shots - Health News
1:20 am
Wed November 27, 2013

To Changing Landscape, Add Private Health Care Exchanges

www.delightimages.com iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 9:30 am

We've been reporting a lot lately on the troubled rollout of President Obama's signature health care law. But at the same time, there are rumblings of a major shift in the way companies offer private health insurance to workers.

It involves what are called "private health care exchanges." These are similar to — but completely separate from — the public exchanges you've heard so much about.

Some experts say this new approach soon could change how millions of Americans receive their health care.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Dozens Of Haitian Migrants Reported Dead After Boat Capsizes

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 7:53 pm

Dozens of Haitians have died in a desperate attempt to reach the Bahamas, after their crowded 40-foot sloop capsized. Deployed from Florida, Coast Guard crews scrambled to work with Bahamian forces to rescue more than 100 survivors Tuesday. The Coast Guard says the craft ran aground in the Bahamas' Exuma Cays.

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Business
4:16 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

The Stock Market Loves The Fed For Now, But Can It Last?

The Dow Jones industrial average closed above 16,000 for the first time last week.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 4:32 pm

Major stock indexes have shot to record highs in the U.S. this year, gaining more than 20 percent, and yet economic growth remains at disappointing levels. A lot of analysts believe the stimulus efforts by the Federal Reserve are behind the stock boom and a possible bubble.

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Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Sen. Chambliss: Why Reduce Iran Sanctions When They're Working?

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., who is vice chair of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, about the Iran deal.

Politics
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

New IRS Rules Would Lessen Influence Of Social Welfare Groups

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

The Obama administration is pushing new regulations that will make it harder for so-called "social welfare" tax-exempt groups to influence elections.

Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Iran Nuclear Deal Will Allow 'Unprecedented' Inspection

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

The six-month agreement struck between Iran and Western nations last weekend lays out a detailed plan of inspection for Iran's nuclear facilities. The White House calls it "unprecedented transparency and intrusive monitoring." So how will that work? Melissa Block speaks with Dr. David A. Kay, former U.N. Chief Weapons Inspector, to find out.

Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Is Easing Iran Sanctions The Right Move?

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

Much of the criticism of the interim nuclear deal reached with Iran Sunday has focused on the sanctions relief Iran will receive over the next six months if it follows through on restricting its nuclear program. Although the only irreversible relief being offered is a gradual release of $4.2 billion in frozen Iranian revenue, critics warn that the "architecture of the sanctions regime has been undermined." Analysts say all the important sanctions hampering Iran's economy remain in place, but the announcement of the deal itself is having a psychological impact on markets.

Media
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

CBS Puts Lara Logan On Leave After Review Of Flawed Benghazi Report

Originally published on Wed November 27, 2013 6:42 am

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

An internal review of a report that aired on CBS' "60 Minutes" about the attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, reached damning conclusions. Now, Laura Logan, the CBS correspondent who reported that story, and her producer are taking leaves of absence at management's request.

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Media
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Report: Humane Association Covered Up Animal Abuse On Hollywood Sets

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

An investigation by The Hollywood Reporter alleges that the American Humane Association has tried to cover up instances of animal abuse and deaths on Hollywood sets. Melissa Block talks with Gary Baum, a senior writer for the magazine who reported the story.

Middle East
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Meet The 'Arabs Got Talent' Star Who Doesn't Speak Arabic

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

A Massachusetts woman is getting a lot of attention in the Arab world where she's advanced to the final of Arabs Got Talent. Jennifer Grout can't speak Arabic, but she sings flawlessly in Arabic.

Africa
3:29 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

U.N. Weighs Response To Central African Republic Conflict

Originally published on Tue November 26, 2013 3:56 pm

World powers are scrambling to get a hold of a crisis in Central African Republic that U.N. officials have warned could lead to genocide. The nation slipped into bloody anarchy after rebels ousted the president in March.

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