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Around the Nation
5:11 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Kittens Force Partial Closure Of NYC Subway

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Big, bad New York City abruptly shut down two subway lines in Brooklyn yesterday when transit workers saw two tiny kittens on the track. Supervisors and transit police joined the pursuit of the little guys. Commuters kibitzed from the platforms. But it still took almost two hours of cat herding to catch the kitties and clear the tracks. Kittens safe, the commute resumed. More mews later. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Around the Nation
5:08 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Have A Red Carpet Moment Whenever You Want

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

If you haven't had enough of last weekend's Video Music Awards, you can take a little of it home with you. A Brooklyn store owner is auctioning off a strip of the long red carpet that was laid in front of his Mini Mart near the event. Yes, Miley Cyrus walked down it before her big performance. Starting bid for the chunk of carpet: 500 bucks. The seller said if no one bites, he'll put it in his basement. If he's a "Big Lebowski" fan, he knows it'll really tie the room together.

The Two-Way
4:59 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Irish Poet Seamus Heaney Dies

Irish poet Seamus Heaney in 2010.
Paul McErlane EPA/Landov

Seamus Heaney, "acclaimed by many as the best Irish poet since Yeats," has died, the BBC and other news outlets are reporting.

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Politics
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Key Members Of Congress Briefed On Syria Intelligence

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

President Obama is trying to convince Congress to get on board with his plans for Syria. Thursday night, some key members of Congress heard from top White House officials during a 90 minute phone call.

Business
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Secret U.S. Spy Budget Revealed

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts a black budget illuminated.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

Middle East
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Iran Warns Against U.S. Military Strikes On Syria

Originally published on Sun September 1, 2013 6:34 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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Middle East
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

If The U.S. Strikes, What Are The Targets Inside Syria?

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, one of the people urging President Obama to act on intelligence findings and strike against Syrian president Bashar al-Assad is retired General Jack Keane. He served in an advisory role in the U.S. occupation of Iraq, and he's now chairman of the board of the Institute for the Study of War. Keane says he has not been involved in the most recent talks about Syria, but he has a long history of military planning at the highest levels, and he gave us a window into the planning that's going on now.

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Middle East
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

White House Presses On With Plans To Strike Syria

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. Preparations for a military strike against Syria continue. The Obama administration says action is necessary, because the Syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people last week, killing hundreds.

WERTHEIMER: All week, the administration has been claiming their case is open and shut.

(SOUNDBITE OF STATEMENTS)

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Sports
2:46 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Concussion Suits: NFL, Retirees Reach $765 Million Deal

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

A dark cloud hanging over the National Football League is a bit lighter today. There is a proposed settlement in a huge concussion lawsuit, brought by over 4,000 former players. The agreement was reached and announced yesterday, a week before the start of the new NFL season. If approved, the league will pay out $765 million to as many as 18,000 former players. NPR's Tom Goldman reports.

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Author Interviews
1:16 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Honest Tea Founders Tell Their Story Of Not-Too-Sweet Success

Barry Nalebuff (left) and Seth Goldman cofounded Honest Tea in 1997. Goldman is the company's TeaEO. Nalebuff is a professor at Yale School of Management.
Crown Business

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

If you want to know what prompted Seth Goldman and Barry Nalebuff to cofound Honest Tea, here's the simple answer they give on their website: They were thirsty. Goldman had taken Nalebuff's class at the Yale School of Management, and they were both tired of the super sweet iced teas available in stores. So in the late 1990s, they started their own company based on the hunch that other people out there felt the same way.

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Shots - Health News
1:06 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Money May Be Motivating Doctors To Do More C-Sections

Pregnant doctors are less likely than other women to deliver their babies via C-section, recent research suggests. Economists say that may be because the physician patients feel more empowered to question the obstetrician.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 6:57 am

Obstetricians perform more cesarean sections when there are financial incentives to do so, according to a new study that explores links between economic incentives and medical decision-making during childbirth.

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The Salt
1:05 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Dumplings Taste Better When Filled With Memories

Just about every culture has a dumpling. For many immigrants and first-generation Americans, dumplings serve as a delicious taste of home and heritage. Pierogis are the Polish take on the form.
Allison Aubrey NPR

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:56 am

Most kids leave Santa cookies. My brother and I would try to bribe him with an extra treat: a couple leftover pierogi from our Christmas Eve dinner.

Instead of sugar plums, pierogi danced in my head. And while I never admitted it in my letter to Santa, I was an accomplished pierogi thief. While they were kept warm on the stove ahead of our guests' arrival, I could lift the cover to the pan that cradled them without making a sound, liberating one to scarf down before my Polish mother walked back into the kitchen. My lips gleamed with a mix of butter and Bonnie Bell lip gloss.

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Science
1:03 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Wise Old Whooping Cranes Keep Captive-Bred Fledglings On Track

This young whooping crane is on its first fall migration, guided by an Operation Migration ultralight aircraft. Each whooper in this population wears an identification band, and many carry tracking devices that record their movements in detail.
Joe Duff Operation Migration USA Inc.

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 12:40 pm

Being a wildlife biologist in the 21st century increasingly means rescuing rare animals from extinction. Among the success stories is the whooping crane. Seventy years ago there were only about 16 birds left on the planet. Now there are about 600.

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Politics
1:01 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Filner's Exit Isn't The End Of San Diego's Mayoral Mayhem

San Diego Mayor Bob Filner announces his resignation last week. His last day in office is Friday.
Bill Wechter Getty Images

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

On Friday, the embattled mayor of San Diego officially steps down. Allegations of sexual harassment against Bob Filner have rocked the eighth-largest American city, which now has to pick up the pieces and elect a new mayor.

The announcement last week that Filner would leave office was greeted with cheers, boos and a flurry of activity from the press — but it all went quiet when the soon-to-be ex-mayor emerged from a swell of bodyguards to speak at the podium.

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StoryCorps
1:00 am
Fri August 30, 2013

Following In The Family Footsteps

Mackenzie Byles graduated in 2010 from Mount Ida College with a degree in Funeral Home Management. She's taking over the family business from her dad, Don.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 7:51 am

Don Byles, 65, is a funeral director in New London, Conn. His grandfather started the family's business, Byles-MacDougall Funeral Service, in 1904. Now, Byles is getting ready to hand it over to his 25-year-old daughter Mackenzie.

"You have to teach me a lot of stuff before you can retire," Mackenzie tells her dad during a recent visit to StoryCorps. "I'm a little nervous about being on my own here. I've got big shoes to fill with you."

Click on the audio link above to hear their StoryCorps conversation.

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Music Interviews
12:03 am
Fri August 30, 2013

'We Grow Songs': Over The Rhine On Making Untamed Music

Over the Rhine is the married duo of Linford Detweiler and Karin Bergquist. The pair's new double album, Meet Me at the Edge of the World, is its 15th studio release.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 8:29 am

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Movie Reviews
4:31 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

With De Palma, Too Much 'Passion' Is Precisely Enough

Is that Noomi Rapace's Isabelle behind the mask (and the knife)? Could be. Probably is. Passion is nothing if not a genre flick — though genre films do come with their twists.
Entertainment One

A pivotal moment in Passion, Brian De Palma's resplendent erotic thriller, centers on a splash of red.

An obvious color, maybe, but one that matters because the scene leading up to it — a tour de force of suspenseful montage that cuts between one character watching a ballet and another preparing for bed — is defined visually by the dark-blue canvases of the dance piece's set, and by the way they blend into the increasingly conspicuous blue filters used to film the rest of the scene.

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World
4:24 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

U.K. Vote Against Syria Strike A Major Setback For Obama

Originally published on Thu November 7, 2013 9:59 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

So where does this leave the Obama administration? For more on that, I'm joined by NPR's Mara Liasson. And Mara, what's the White House reaction been to this vote in the British Parliament tonight?

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World
4:19 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

U.K. Lawmakers Vote Against Syria Strike

Originally published on Fri August 30, 2013 4:04 am

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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The Salt
4:01 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Antibiotic Use On The Farm: Are We Flying Blind?

Piglets in a pen on a hog farm in Frankenstein, Mo.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 3:26 pm

There's a heated debate over the use of antibiotics in farm animals. Critics say farmers overuse these drugs; farmers say they don't.

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

British Parliament Closes Door On Syria Intervention

The Houses of Parliament are silhouetted against a setting sun as lawmakers debate possible British military action in Syria.
Andrew Cowie AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:35 pm

After debating deep into the night, the British House of Commons refused a precursory resolution on military strikes in Syria. The resolution, which failed 272-285, called for a second vote to authorize military action once the U.N. inspectors have issued their findings on whether the Syrian regime of Bashar Assad used chemical weapons against its own people.

"It is clear to me the British Parliament, reflecting the views of the British people, does not want to see British military action," Prime Minister David Cameron said. "I get that and the government will act accordingly."

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Middle East
3:34 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Why Syria Is More Complicated Than Libya

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:23 pm

The Arab spring has brought large-scale protests and violence to at least half a dozen countries in the past three years. Until now, the U.S. has only intervened militarily in one of them — Libya.

Now, as President Obama considers a strike on Syria, here's a look at some of the differences between the two scenarios:

1. Syria's Not Standing Alone

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Movie Reviews
3:03 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

'Getaway.' No, Really. Get Away From Here. Off My Lawn!

Ethan Hawke headlines the picture, along with Selena Gomez, but it's still pretty much a movie about a car. Which for some reason is largely bulletproof.
Simon Versano Warner Bros. Pictures

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 8:24 am

Some movies can be ruined by thinking about them too much. Then there are the movies you ruin by thinking about them at all. The former can be fun exercises in effortless diversion. But when concerted effort is required not to ask any story-deflating questions about what's up on the screen, it kind of flattens the fun.

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The Record
2:58 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Can Streaming Services Make Money?

On June 15, the day that Pandora became a publicly traded company, traders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange wore the company's insignia.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:48 pm

Every time you turn around it seems like there's a new streaming music service. Pandora was among the first a decade ago. Rdio launched in 2010. Spotify came to the U.S. in the summer of 2011. Apple and Google plan to join the fray this year. Music producer Jimmy Iovine is launching a service tied to his headphone brand Beats by Dr. Dre.

What's odd is they are all jumping into a business that, so far, doesn't seem to be turning a profit.

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Movie Interviews
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Rebecca Hall, Finding New Thrills In The Family Business

Chaos, panic and disorder: Rebecca Hall stars as a barrister whose assignment leads to all kinds of bad things in the security-state thriller Closed Circuit.
Jay Maidment Focus Features

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 5:22 pm

Rebecca Hall, a veteran of films like Vicky Cristina Barcelona and The Town, is the star of the new surveillance-state thriller Closed Circuit, playing an English barrister charged with monitoring top-secret, closed-to-the-public evidence hearings involving a terrorist bombing.

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Around the Nation
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Lady Houdini's Escape Act Breaks Through Not Just Handcuffs

Rochelle Fowler watches with tears on her face as Lady Houdini works to break free. Harry Houdini made the water torture cell famous more than 100 years ago.
Sadie Babits Boise State Public Radio

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:23 pm

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Business
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Threat Of U.S. Strike In Syria Drives Up Oil Prices

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:01 pm

Crude oil prices are up about 20 percent over the past two months. On Tuesday, the price of the U.S. benchmark, West Texas Intermediate, hit $109. Events in Syria are driving the price spike. Syria doesn't produce much oil, but there is great concern that the conflict there might spill over and involve other Persian Gulf nations such as Iran and Saudi Arabia.

Middle East
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Reporter Describes Apprehensive, Frightened Mood In Syria

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:01 pm

Melissa Block talks to BBC reporter Jeremy Bowen about the situation on the ground in Syria from the capital of Damascus.

Middle East
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

U.K. Position Makes Syria Strike More Complicated For U.S.

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:01 pm

A UN weapons inspection team is due to leave Syria on Saturday, but it will take time for them to review all of the material they've gathered about an alleged chemical weapons attack. The British government now says it will wait to hear the report before taking any military action to punish Bashar al-Assad's regime. That leaves the U.S. in an awkward position. It has written off the UN route because of Russia's opposition to any action.

Europe
2:51 pm
Thu August 29, 2013

Cameron Has A Hard Time Selling Syria Strike To Parliament

Originally published on Thu August 29, 2013 4:01 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Around the world today, there are deliberations about Syria. The governments of the U.S., France and Britain are pushing for action in response to last week's alleged chemical weapons attack. They blame the Syrian government for the deaths of hundreds of people outside Damascus.

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