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The Two-Way
6:15 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Book News: Richard Dawkins Under Fire For Child Abuse Remarks

Author and evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins made a March 2012 visit to NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Doriane Raiman NPR

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 8:57 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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All Songs Considered
6:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

First Watch: Polyphonic Spree, 'Raise Your Head'

A man calmly opens a bag of pretzels while another is mauled by a tiger in this scene from The Polyphonic Spree's "Raise Your Head" video.
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:56 am

The inventor and engineer Rube Goldberg was known for designing elaborate machines that performed simple tasks, usually in a string of successive events, each one triggering the next. His work has been the inspiration for a lot of fantastic art and music videos (think of OK Go's "This Too Shall Pass," or A-Trak's "Tuna Melt").

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It's All Politics
5:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama's Shift On Syria: A Show Of Strength Or Fear?

President Obama walks along the West Wing Colonnade toward the Oval Office ahead of Tuesday night's speech on Syria.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:00 am

One line President Obama might have borrowed for his speech to the nation Tuesday night was a famous one from John F. Kennedy's inauguration address: "Let us never negotiate out of fear, but let us never fear to negotiate."

Always admired as a fine turn of phrase, what meaning does this have in our own time?

Perhaps it might have helped Obama make the turn from indicting the Syrian regime's alleged use of chemical weapons to explaining why he backed off his own earlier threat of military retaliation against Syria.

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Politics
5:54 am
Wed September 11, 2013

U.S. Fleshes Out Russian Plan For Syria's Chemical Weapons

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Obama last night urged a strike on Syria that he is not yet ready to order and that the country seems unready to accept.

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The Two-Way
5:47 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Anthony Weiner's Run Ends With A Flourish Of His Finger

Anthony Weiner on Tuesday, before the results came in and before he waved goodbye.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 6:55 am

Voters in New York City are waiting to see whether Democratic mayoral candidate Bill de Blasio reached the 40 percent point that would avoid an Oct. 1 runoff with challenger William Thompson.

With about 98 percent of precincts having reported the results from Tuesday's voting, our colleagues at WNYC say that de Blasio has 40.19 percent of the vote to Thompson's 26.04 percent.

If de Blasio is declared the winner, he would face Republican Joe Lhota in November.

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Europe
5:14 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Authorities Discover Vodka Vending Machine

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. We've told you about baguettes in France offered in vending machines and bars of gold in Abu Dhabi. Now we can report on a vending machine selling vodka in Ukraine. For a dollar, patrons could enjoy a shot in the town center of Melitopol, mixers also available - until the machine was discovered by authorities. Unlawfully produced vodka is widespread in Ukraine and the vodka vending machine - a converted coffee maker. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Book Reviews
5:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

In These 'Gardens,' The Tree Rings Of The Radical Left

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 3:48 pm

Mohsin Hamid's latest novel is called How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.

Jonathan Lethem's latest novel, Dissident Gardens, is expansive in scale. Chronologically speaking, it begins in the 1930s with Communist Party meetings in the U.S. It passes through the rise of McCarthyism, the establishment of the New York Mets, the hippie Age of Aquarius and the AIDS crisis. It ventures briefly abroad, to such places as behind-the-Iron-Curtain East Germany and war-torn Nicaragua. It ends in the Obama era of Occupy sit-ins and a rampant TSA.

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The Two-Way
5:03 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Kerry's Meeting With Russian Is Next Key Moment In Syria Crisis

Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday as he testified before the House Armed Services Committee.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:00 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: Jean Cochran rounds up the latest news about the crisis in Syria

Now that President Obama has made his case to the nation for holding Syrian President Bashar Assad responsible for a chemical weapons attack last month near Damascus, the next key moment in the quickly evolving crisis appears to be Thursday's meeting in Geneva between Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov.

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Around the Nation
4:43 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Cave Explorers Find Wallet Lost 17 Years Ago

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

Seventeen years ago, Joseph Sweet and a friend went into a cave in Watertown, New York and got lost inside. They grew so desperate for light that Mr. Sweet made little torches out of the only fuel he had, taking dollar bills from his wallet and setting them on fire. On top of everything else, he lost the wallet. He was finally rescued. And now, 17 years later, different cave explorers found the wallet, still with ID, and returned it.

Middle East
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Will Military Threat Keep Diplomacy Working In Syria?

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

President Obama told the nation last night that with modest effort and risk, they can stop children from being gassed in Syria.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: I believe we should act. That's what makes America different. That's what makes us exceptional.

INSKEEP: The president also said America should wait to see if a diplomatic effort works out.

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Middle East
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Syrian Refugees In Turkey Want U.S. Strikes, Turks Are Wary

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Americans have choices about how involved they want to be in Syria's civil war. Syrians have no choice, and the same is true of Syria's neighbors.

People along Turkey's border with Syria deal with errant mortar fire, refugees and lost trade. And we're going next to a Turkish village along that dividing line.

Here's NPR's Peter Kenyon.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Ceylanpinar is one of those small Turkish villages smack on the border, and it has the scars to show for it.

(SOUNDBITE OF TRAIN)

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Middle East
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Obama Puts Military Strike In Syria On Hold

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Good morning.

President Obama's push for a military strike on Syria is on hold, at least for now. The administration is exploring a possible diplomatic alternative that calls for Syria to surrender its stockpile of chemical weapons. That could provide a face-saving out for the president, who appeared unlikely to win Congressional approval this week for a strike.

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Around the Nation
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Victims of Sept. 11 To Be Remembered

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

The country will pause Wednesday morning to remember the victims of the Sept. 11 terror attacks. At the site of the Twin Towers in lower Manhattan, the names of all the victims will be read, along with the victims of the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Author Interviews
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Hitting Terrorists Where It Hurts: Their Wallet

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Since Sept. 11, one of the most effective ways the United States has found to weaken terrorist groups has been to go after their finances. Renee Montagne talks to former Treasury official Juan Zarate, who's new book is: Treasury's War: The Unleashing of a New Era of Financial Warfare.

Business
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

World's Largest Ferris Wheel Will Be In Las Vegas

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Las Vegas is adding an eye-catching tourist attraction, in the form of a huge wheel that can take more than 1,000 people on a ride 550 feet into the sky over the city's famed Strip. The main construction of the wheel, called the High Roller, is nearly finished; it is expected to open in early 2014.

Business
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Price Of New iPhone May Be Too Expensive For China Market

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

In a sign of China's growing importance as a market for Apple, the company will be rolling out its new iPhones simultaneously in the U.S. and China for the first time later this month. There are a few signs, however, that the new models will not find the sort of frenzied demand as before.

Business
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Dow Jones Changes Up Index

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

The Dow Jones Industrial Average is swapping out three of its blue chip companies, in what's being called the biggest shake up of the index in almost a decade. Standard & Poor's announced it's dropping Hewlett Packard, Alcoa and Bank of America at the end of next week. Sliding into their places: Visa, Nike and Goldman Sachs.

Around the Nation
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Good Work Comes Out Of The Sept. 11 Tragedies

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Today marks the 12th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Over the last several years, a group of family members have created a movement to turn the anniversary into a national day of service. This year more than 30 million people will be involved, and they claim it's the largest day of service in the country.

Middle East
2:55 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Diplomatic Solution In Syria Is Rife With Complications

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Diplomats continue to consider a Russian plan to get Syria to hand over its chemical weapons to international control. If nations can agree on the details, the plan could avert a U.S. strike against Syrian targets. But accounting for and destroying Syria's chemical arsenal is a complicated undertaking.

NPR Story
2:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Tech Visionary Focuses Now On Biological Weapons Threat

Originally published on Mon September 16, 2013 2:54 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Next, we'll introduce you to Nathan Myhrvold, who made his name as a prolific inventor at Microsoft. These days, he's focusing on a different kind of technological advance - the threat from biological weapons. Myhrvold is in Washington this week to meet with national security leaders, and try to convince them to spend time and energy on potential attacks. NPR's Carrie Johnson reports.

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NPR Story
2:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Documents Show NSA Violated Court Restrictions

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

The National Security Agency violated special court restrictions on the use of a database of telephone calls, but the NSA says it fixed those problems. That's the bottom line from more documents declassified by the director of National Intelligence. The document dump is part of an effort to share more details about NSA surveillance activities that were uncovered by former government contractor Edward Snowden.

NPR Story
2:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Getting College Credit For What You Already Know

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK. Maybe you're one of the millions of Americans who attended college but never had a chance to finish. And you have dozens or scores or hundreds of credits just sitting there that don't quite add up to a degree. The University of Wisconsin system has introduced an alternative way to finish your degree by earning credits based on what you already know. It's the so-called Flex Option.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Heavy Rotation
1:30 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Heavy Rotation: 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

WEAA's Strictly Hip-Hop program is a big fan of North Carolina MC Rapsody.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:06 am

Our September edition of Heavy Rotation features an African legend, an indie-folk orchestra from Portland, and a French band ready to catch on in America. But first, our panelists:

  • David Dye, host of WXPN's World Cafe
  • Anne Litt, a host on KCRW in Santa Monica, Calif.
  • Kevin Cole, program director at KEXP in Seattle
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Around the Nation
1:26 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Four-Legged Impostors Give Service Dog Owners Pause

Lauren Henderson and her service dog, Phoebe, in Los Angeles. Henderson says she's seeing more dogs in vests that don't appear to be legitimate service dogs.
Lisa Napoli KCRW

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

Lauren Henderson goes everywhere with her service dog Phoebe — to the grocery store, Disneyland, the beach. For Henderson, who used to be paralyzed, her 100 pound, lumbering Saint Bernard is a necessity.

An actor who lives in Malibu, Calif., Henderson uses her dog for stability and balance. And if she falls, Phoebe helps pull her back on her feet.

"She's basically like a living walker," Henderson says.

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Planet Money
1:25 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Why Women (Like Me) Choose Lower-Paying Jobs

Share of women in most lucrative majors
Quoctrung Bui/NPR Anthony Carnevale

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 9:01 am

The other day, I was interviewing an economist who studies the effect college majors have on peoples' income. He was telling me that women often make decisions that lead them to earn less than they otherwise might.

Women are overrepresented among majors that don't pay very well (psychology, art, comparative literature), and underrepresented in lots of lucrative majors (most fields in engineering).

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Sweetness And Light
1:25 am
Wed September 11, 2013

Diana Nyad's Accomplishment Makes America's Cup Look All Wet

Long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad swims toward shore in Key West, Fla., on Sept. 2, the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage. She arrived at the beach about 53 hours after beginning her swim in Havana.
J Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

For sportswriters the fattest target has always been the America's Cup. It's too easy. It's like all those political writers who make fun of vice presidents and think they're being original. Sportswriters have been going har-de-har-har about the America's Cup even long before one of their wags said it was like watching paint dry. Or like watching grass grow. One or the other. Maybe both.

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The Record
10:28 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

What Does A Song That Costs $5 Sound Like?

Cookie Marenco records musicians on a small remote recording console live at the California Audio Show in August. She'll demonstrate the quality of DSD to the audience by playing back her recording. How close will it sound to the live performance? Very close, according to people present.
Cindy Carpien

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 10:04 am

Last week, Sony Corporation announced a new line of high-end audio components that promise to deliver a better online audio experience. The announcement comes amid growing evidence that music fans are tired of the crappy sound they hear on their portable music players. Case in point is the success of Cookie Marenco's business of selling super high-definition music downloads.

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The Two-Way
4:39 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

In Iowa, Blind People Can Carry Guns In Public; Not Everyone's A Fan

A debate is taking place in Iowa over the ability of people who are legally or completely blind to carry guns in public. The issue stems from a 2011 change in the state's gun permit rules, allowing visually impaired people to carry firearms in public.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Humberto Expected To Become First Hurricane Of Atlantic Season

Tropical Storms Humberto and Gabrielle. Humberto is expected to become the first hurricane of the Atlantic season.
National Hurricane Center

Originally published on Tue September 10, 2013 6:05 pm

Tropical Storm Humberto is poised to get a promotion, becoming the first hurricane of an otherwise lackluster Atlantic season to date.

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All Tech Considered
4:11 pm
Tue September 10, 2013

Key To Unlocking Your Phone? Give It The Finger(print)

Phil Schiller, Apple's senior vice president of worldwide marketing, speaks about fingerprint security features of the new iPhone 5s Tuesday in Cupertino, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 5:54 am

The first note I sent out after Apple announced it was including a fingerprint scanner in the new iPhone 5s was to Charlie Miller.

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