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Parallels
10:46 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Expected Flow Of Bulgarians, Romanians Raises Hackles In Europe

Keith Vaz, a British member of Parliament and chairman of the home affairs select committee (left), greets arrivals at Luton Airport, including Victor Spirescu (right) on Wednesday. The first Romanians and Bulgarians with unrestricted access to the U.K. labor market have begun to arrive despite last-ditch efforts to prevent a feared wave of fresh immigration.
Jennifer Cockerell PA Photos/Landov

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:53 pm

Over the New Year's holiday, Bulgarians and Romanians became free to move across the European Union in search of jobs as the bloc's last labor restrictions were lifted. As we've previously told you, the prospect of a flood of workers from two of the EU's newest and poorest members has prompted fears of "poverty migrants" — especially in Britain and Germany.

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The Two-Way
10:30 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Warring South Sudan Factions Arrive In Ethiopia For Peace Talks

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:14 pm

Delegates representing the warring factions in South Sudan's conflict arrived Thursday for peace talks in Addis Ababa, the Ethiopian capital.

NPR's Gregory Warner, who has been reporting on the fighting in the world's newest country, tells our Newscast unit:

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Beauty Shop
10:07 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Apologies Needed For Beyonce's Song?

Critics are slamming Beyonce for using an audio clip from the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster in her new song "XO." Was she being insensitive, or artistic? Host Michel Martin hears from the beauty shop ladies: journalists Bridget Johnson and Keli Goff, and Maria Teresa Kumar of Voto Latino.

World
10:07 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Top Global Stories To Watch In 2014

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 6:57 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Law
10:07 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Colorado's Pot Law Fires Up This Week

Retail sales of recreational marijuana are now legal in Colorado. Host Michel Martin looks at the highs, and possible lows of the new law with Dana Coffield of The Denver Post, and The Sacramento Bee's Peter Hecht, author of Weed Land.

The Two-Way
9:57 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Michael Schumacher Remains In Coma On Eve Of 45th Birthday

Michael Schumacher in April 2012.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Race car legend Michael Schumacher "remains in a critical but stable condition on Thursday, four days after his skiing accident in the French Alps," Sky Sports reports.

The German driver turns 45 on Friday.

His family has posted a message to those who have shown their concern for his health:

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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Thu January 2, 2014

As Promised, Toronto Mayor Rob Ford Files For Re-Election

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford.
Fred Thornhill Reuters/Landov

Saying he's been "the best mayor this city has ever had," Toronto's Rob Ford on Thursday filed the paperwork to seek re-election in October.

The mayor's follow-through on a promise to run again comes two months after he famously admitted that "yes, I have smoked crack cocaine ... probably in one of my drunken stupors."

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The Two-Way
8:21 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Juanita Moore, Groundbreaking Actress, Dies

Actress Juanita Moore in 1960. She died Wednesday at the age of 99.
AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 10:19 am

  • From the NPR Newscast: NPR's Kat Chow on the life of actress Juanita Moore

"Juanita Moore, a groundbreaking actress and an Academy Award nominee for her role as Lana Turner's black friend in the classic weeper Imitation of Life, has died," The Associated Press writes.

The wire service adds that "actor Kirk Kelleykahn, her grandson, said that Moore collapsed and died Wednesday at her home in Los Angeles. She was 99, according to Kelleykahn. Accounts of her age have differed over the years."

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The Two-Way
7:38 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Accident Or Not? Palestinian Diplomat's Death Is A Mystery

The scene outside the residence of Palestinian diplomat Jamal al-Jamal in Prague. An explosion there Wednesday killed the 56-year-old ambassador.
Filip Singer EPA/LANDOV

Was the Palestinian ambassador to the Czech Republic killed by accident or are the circumstances of his death on Wednesday more nefarious?

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Bonus Round: Ask Me Another
7:03 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Day 9: Ophira Eisenberg, The 1980s Girl Guide

Isn't she cute?
Astrid Eisenberg Courtesy of Ophira Eisenberg

This is the ninth day of Ask Me Another's 12 Days of Xmas series.

Yes, this is Ask Me Another host Ophira Eisenberg, circa 1980, as a Girl Guide.

What's a Girl Guide, you ask? We'll let Ophira explain:

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The Two-Way
6:57 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Jobless Claims Were Nearly Unchanged Last Week

There were 339,000 first-time claims filed for unemployment insurance last week, down slightly from 341,000 the week before, the Employment and Training Administration says.

According to The Associated Press, the slight decline is "evidence that layoffs are low and hiring will likely remain steady."

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The Two-Way
5:45 am
Thu January 2, 2014

100 Million People In Path Of 2014's First Wintry Blast

Snow was falling fast Thursday morning in Albany, N.Y.
Mike Groll AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 9:29 pm

Updated 11:30 p.m. ET

The Associated Press reports: "The National Weather Service said 21 inches of snow had fallen in Boxford, just north of Boston, by Thursday night, while other parts of the state had 17 or 18 inches. It said parts of upstate New York had 18 inches."

The New York Times reports:

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Around the Nation
5:27 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Twins Born Minutes Apart But In Different Years

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. If little Lorraine Begazo turns out like many big sisters, she'll lord it over her brother Brandon that she's the older one. And she was born the year before he was. The news is that they're twins. Lorraine was born two minutes before midnight on New Year's Eve 2013. Brandon came along one minute after we rang in 2014. The twins' father says they'll celebrate with two cakes and blow out the candles over two years. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
5:11 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Colorado Begins Sales Of Recreational Marijuana

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:39 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is green rush.

The first legal sale of recreational marijuana in recent memory happened in Denver yesterday.

TONY FOX: 8 a.m., we're going to do.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

That's Tony Fox, who owns the 3-D Cannabis Center. She was making the ceremonial first sale, surrounded by dozens of reporters, to Sean Azzariti, an Iraq War veteran with PTSD, who was involved in the campaign to legalize pot in Colorado.

FOX: Sean, your total is $59.74.

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The Two-Way
4:59 am
Thu January 2, 2014

VIDEO: Stranded Passengers Flown To Safety In Antarctic

Help arrives: an image from video taken as a helicopter landed Thursday on an ice floe in the Antarctic. The copter then carried passengers from a stranded ship to another vessel waiting nearby in open waters.
Intrepid Science

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:51 am

After more than a week aboard a ship stuck in ice off Antarctica, 52 scientists and paying passengers from the Russian ship MV Akademik Shokalskiy are either aboard or headed to an Australian icebreaker that will now take them to warmer waters.

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Pop Culture
4:37 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Isaac Asimov Right On With Some 2014 Predictions

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene.

Fifty years ago, science fiction writer Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014, and he was right. He foresaw gadgets that relieve mankind of tedious jobs, like machines that heat water and prepare coffee. He predicted smartphones, noting we'd be able to see and hear someone we call, and be able to look at photos on the same screen. He even knew Twitter and reality TV were coming, writing, quote: Mankind will suffer badly from the disease of boredom.

Research News
4:25 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Scarcity Trap Affects Our Thinking, Behavior

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

A Harvard economist finds there are psychological connections between the bad financial planning of many poor people and the poor time management of busy professionals. In both cases, he finds the experience of scarcity causes biases in the mind that exacerbate problems.

National Security
4:04 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Is U.S. Ready Rethink Sept. 11 Security Policies?

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene. Good morning. President Obama says he will soon propose changes at the National Security Agency. Former contractor Edward Snowden's disclosure of NSA surveillance programs widespread criticism and prompted a review of the agency's operations by Congress, the courts, and the White House. NPR's Tom Gjelten looks at whether the country is now at a turning point, ready to rethink the security policies in place since 9/11.

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Business
3:40 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Given A Second Chance, Convicted Currency Trader Helps Others

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:33 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And even as things are looking up for the auto industry, many Americans still feel the sting of the 2008 recession. In the years since, many banks have been hit with large fines, but no major Wall Street executive has been convicted of criminal charges for their role in the financial crisis. That's not always how it went. A few years ago, a series of corporate scandals generated outrage and some stiff prison sentences.

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Television
3:37 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Fielder Offers Absurd Marketing Advice On Comedy Central

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:01 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Let's hear now about a new reality show featuring a mild-mannered Canadian who gives outlandish advice to companies looking to up their game. It's called "Nathan for You." And as NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports, it's become an unlikely hit for Comedy Central.

(SOUNDBITE OF A BARKING DOG)

MANDALIT DEL BARCO, BYLINE: On a sunny winter day in North Hollywood, Nathan Fielding is directing his latest quirky marketing ploy, this one for a new housecleaning service.

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Television
3:33 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Malcolm Jamal Warner On Growing Up On 'The Cosby Show'

Originally published on Fri January 3, 2014 6:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

If you ever watched "The Cosby Show," you know this voice well.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE COSBY SHOW")

MALCOLM JAMAL WARNER: (as Theo) You know dad's cooking is really delicious. I just wish he wouldn't tell us what's in it.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Why The Cod On Cape Cod Now Comes From Iceland

With local cod so scarce, Chef Toby Hill of Lyric Restaurant in Yarmouth Port, Mass., tries out a dogfish salad — served here with garlic aioli on toast — instead. Dogfish is still plentiful in New England waters, but wholesale fisheries say there's not much demand for it in the U.S.
Christine Hochkeppel Courtesy of Cape Cod Times

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 12:53 pm

Good luck finding local cod in Cape Cod, Mass.

The fish once sustained New England's fishing industry, but in recent years, regulators have imposed severe catch limits on cod, and the fish remain scarce.

"I've never seen cod fishing this bad," says Greg Walinsky, who has been fishing on Cape Cod for more than 30 years. "It looks to me like it's over. And I can't catch any codfish."

It's so bad, many fishermen say, that for the first time, they cannot catch enough cod to even reach shrinking government quotas.

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Planet Money
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

A Bet, Five Metals And The Future Of The Planet

James Cridland Flickr

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 9:24 am

This famous bet — between a biologist and an economist — was over population growth. It started three decades ago, but it helped set the tone for environmental debates that are still happening today.

The biologist at the heart of this bet was Paul Ehrlich at Stanford. He wrote a best-selling book in 1968 called The Population Bomb. It was so popular he appeared on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

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Africa
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

South Sudan Peace Talks Begin, Fighting Persists

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Our colleague Gregory Warner was reporting in South Sudan recently and he described something ominous. As he put it, people are starting to ask who their neighbors are. It suggested that a violent political struggle in Africa's youngest country could erupt into a civil war fueled by tribal differences. Today, South Sudan's warring factions will meet for the first time in neighboring Ethiopia. This comes as fighting still rages. Here again, NPR's Gregory Warner.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

How Mass-Produced Meat Turned Phosphorus Into Pollution

A dead carp floats in water near the shore at Big Creek State Park on Sept. 10 in Polk City, Iowa. Like many agricultural states, Iowa is working with the EPA to enforce clean-water regulations amid degradation from manure spills and farm-field runoff.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 8:27 am

It's a quandary of food production: The same drive for efficiency that lowers the cost of eating also can damage our soil and water.

Take the case of one simple, essential chemical element: phosphorus.

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NPR Story
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Saudi Arabia To Give Military Aid To Lebanon

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 9:29 am

Lebanon has announced Saudi Arabia will give it $3 billion to buy weapons. To explain the significance of this gift, Renee Montagne talks to Aram Nerguizian, a senior fellow with the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

NPR Story
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

2014 Election Cycle Expected To Showcase Political Drama

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

This year promises to bring plenty of political drama — and some high stakes races — with mid-term elections in full view. Billions of dollars will be spent in House, Senate and governors' contests. And some of the nation's most powerful politicians will scramble to hold onto their seats.

NPR Story
3:22 am
Thu January 2, 2014

Fiat Pays $4.3 Billion To Get Complete Control Of Chrysler

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 5:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Fiat and Chrysler.

The Italian automaker Fiat has paid $4.3 billion to gain complete ownership of Chrysler. The agreement announced yesterday is not a big surprise. Fiat already held a majority share of the Detroit automaker that produces Chrysler, Jeep and Dodge vehicles.

Industry analysts say this final step in the merger creates a global company that's better able to compete with the likes of General Motors, Toyota and Volkswagen. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Shots - Health News
2:24 am
Thu January 2, 2014

'Good Behavior' More Than A Game To Health Care Plan

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 6:03 am

Behaving well in elementary school could reduce smoking in later life. At least, that's what Trillium Community Health Plan hopes, and it's putting money behind the idea.

Danebo Elementary in Eugene, Ore., is one of 50 schools receiving money to teach classes while integrating something called the "Good Behavior Game." Teacher Cami Railey sits at a small table, surrounded by four kids. She's about to teach them the "s" sound and the "a" sound. But first, as she does every day, she goes over the rules.

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