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The Two-Way
4:57 am
Wed September 18, 2013

No Guns Please, Starbucks Tells Customers

A Starbucks customer — gun on his hip and drink in his hand — watches a rally by gun control advocates, in Seattle in 2010.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:42 am

With the coffee giant caught in the middle of what he says is an "increasingly uncivil and, in some cases, even threatening" debate, Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz has posted a letter to "fellow Americans" asking that they not bring guns into Starbucks' shops.

Schultz writes that:

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World
4:46 am
Wed September 18, 2013

New Zealand Men Give New Meaning To The Words: Beer Tap

With the sponsorship of a brewery, the men rigged a friend's home so that beer flowed from all the taps.

World
4:43 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Why Lilly Collins Is The 'Most Dangerous Celebrity'

Fantasy film star Lily Collins seems harmless but beware of looking for more about the starlet on the Internet. According to antivirus software company McAfee, she is the Most Dangerous Celebrity. Plugging Collins' name into a search engine has a 14 percent chance of turning up a computer virus.

Around the Nation
2:39 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Investigators Delve Into Aaron Alexis' Background

As the investigation into Monday's mass shooting at the Washington Navy Yard progresses, authorities are learning more about the mental state of the gunman, 34-year-old Aaron Alexis. A recent police report indicates Alexis was hearing voices coming from walls. Meanwhile, work is resuming at the Navy Yard.

Business
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Home Care Workers To Be Included In Wage And Overtime Law

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Almost 2 million Americans are employed as home care workers. Wow. Many of them are not covered by minimum wage and overtime laws, but that is about to change. NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports.

WENDY KAUFMAN, BYLINE: The new rules, announced by the White House, cover in-home aides who assist the elderly or the disabled with things like dressing, feeding and taking medications.

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Latin America
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Brazil's President Postpones U.S. Visit Over Spying Concerns

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A secret surveillance court has issued a very rare public defense of the U.S. program that collects massive data on phone calls. The court wrote that this program which stores numbers and call times but not content, we're told, does not violate privacy rights.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The American Civil Liberties Union countered that it is folly to trust privacy decisions to a secret court.

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Around the Nation
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Gun Control Advocates Say Little After Navy Yard Shooting

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 3:19 am

In the aftermath of this week's shooting rampage at the Navy Yard in Washington, D.C., there has been no revival of the debate over gun control. In fact, the response from both sides in the debate has been muted. That's very different from what happened after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shootings in December.

Politics
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

House Bill Would Cut 3.8 Million People From Food Stamp Rolls

Advocates for the poor say the proposed cuts to the food stamp program — $40 billion over 10 years — don't make sense at a time when unemployment remains high.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 2:44 pm

The House of Representatives is expected to take up a bill Thursday that would chart the course for federal nutrition programs for years to come.

The measure calls for $40 billion in cuts over a decade to the federal food stamp program, now known as SNAP. The measure's Republican backers say it attacks fraud, but advocates say it will hurt the poor.

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Education
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Should It Take 2 Or 3 Years To Earn A Law Degree?

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 2:49 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Law students are looking for some changes to their education. The American Bar Association plans to issue a report in the next few weeks, recommending a major overhaul of how law schools operate. And students are hoping that a recent comment from President Obama, will boost one reform in particular: cutting law schools down to two years, from three.

NPR's Tovia Smith reports.

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Business
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Police Impersonators Jump Line To Buy 'Grand Theft Auto V'

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 4:06 am

Three New York men were so eager to get the game; they hatched a scheme that could be one of its plots. According to the New York Post, the men pulled up to a mall in an unmarked vehicle, walked past hundreds of people in line and purchased the game. Real police pulled them over after they ran multiple stop signs trying to get away.

Business
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Walgreen's Revamps Employee Health Care Package

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 4:10 am

The pharmacy chain is expected to announce that it will provide payments to employees so they can shop around for their own insurance. That is in lieu of supplying a company-sponsored benefit plan.

Race
2:27 am
Wed September 18, 2013

University Of Alabama Moves To Integrate Greek System

Judy Bonner, the University of Alabama's new president, when the school's championship football team visited the White House on April 19, 2012.
Mike Theiler UPI /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 6:48 pm

Students at the University of Alabama and community leaders are reacting to allegations that white sororities denied access to black women because of their race.

The student newspaper in Tuscaloosa, the Crimson White, ran a story that quotes sorority members who say they wanted to recruit at least two black candidates but the students' names were removed before members could vote on them.

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National Security
1:19 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Officials: Edward Snowden's Leaks Were Masked By Job Duties

Government officials tell NPR that Edward Snowden's job responsibilities allowed him to copy sensitive files unnoticed.
Maxim Shemetov Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:58 am

More than three months after Edward Snowden revealed details of NSA secret surveillance activities, intelligence officials are still assessing the fallout from the former contractor's disclosures. But they already know how the leaks happened.

"We have an extremely good idea of exactly what data he got access to and how exactly he got access to it," says the NSA's chief technology officer, Lonny Anderson.

In interviews with NPR, two government officials shared that part of the Snowden story in one of the most detailed discussions of the episode to date.

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Sweetness And Light
1:19 am
Wed September 18, 2013

More Than Average: Dow Jones Adds The 'Swoosh'

Don Ryan AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 2:01 pm

After 117 years, sports has finally made it to the big time, when, starting next Tuesday, a sports company will be included in the Dow Jones averages.

The Dow Jones, of course, has always preferred very serious corporations –– your banks, your automotives, your insurers. OK, the movies were allowed in 1932 with the inclusion of Loews, and Walt Disney was brought onboard in 1991, but sports was never considered substantial enough for an industrial average until now, when Nike has been ordained.

Yes, Dow Jones has the swoosh.

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Florida Makes Spreading Word On Health Care Law A Challenge

Florida Gov. Rick Scott has questioned efforts to use federally funded navigators to help people enroll for insurance through the Affordable Care Act.
John Raoux AP

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 11:01 am

At a community center named for Florida civil rights pioneer Carrie Meek, a few dozen members of Miami's National Church of God gathered over the weekend for a tea party — and to hear from a special guest, Monica Rodriguez of Enroll America.

The organization is working to spread the word about the Affordable Care Act, the federal law that will let people without health insurance shop for coverage starting Oct. 1.

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The Salt
1:16 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Just What The Doctor Ordered: Med Students Team With Chefs

Fourth year Tulane medical school student Neha Solanki (far right) preps a Greek frittata during a class at Johnson & Wales.
Kristin Gourlay RIPR

Originally published on Thu September 19, 2013 7:26 am

For the past few weeks, the culinary arts students at Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I., have been working with some less-than-seasoned sous chefs.

One of them, Clinton Piper, may look like a pro in his chef's whites, but he's struggling to work a whisk through some batter. "I know nothing about baking," he says.

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Author Interviews
1:16 am
Wed September 18, 2013

'Don't Know'? Just Admit It

Franck Camhi iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 7:19 am

We've all faked our way through conversations before — whether about books we haven't read, movies we haven't seen or concepts we don't understand. In her new book, I Don't Know: In Praise of Admitting Ignorance (Except When You Shouldn't), Leah Hager Cohen explores moments in history and everyday life when "I don't know" can have a big impact.

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Your Money
1:15 am
Wed September 18, 2013

Your Kids And Money: Teaching The Value Of A Dollar

What's the point of an allowance?
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 2:41 pm

What's the point of an allowance?

For Ron Lieber, personal finance writer for The New York Times, it's a tool to help teach values and character traits like patience, moderation, thrift and generosity. And Lieber, who's writing a book, The Opposite of Spoiled, about kids, money and values, tells Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep there are three basic ways that parents approach an allowance.

No chores necessary.

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The Two-Way
5:27 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Judge Orders New Trial In New Orleans Bridge Shooting Case

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:19 pm

A federal judge ordered a new trial for five former New Orleans Police Department officers convicted in connection to the shooting deaths of two men on the Danziger Bridge in New Orleans.

The shootings gained national attention because they took place during the chaotic aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

The New Orleans Times-Picayune reports the judge ordered a new trial because of the "grotesque" misconduct of federal prosecutors. The paper adds:

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It's All Politics
4:53 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Dad, I'm 'A Massachusetts Liberal'

Campaign ad from Carl Sciortino, the Massachusetts Democrat running in the Oct. 15 House special election primary.
Campaign ad

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 1:04 pm

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The Two-Way
4:19 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Car Factories Turn Robots And Humans Into Co-Workers

A robot arm helps make engine components at a Volkswagen factory in Germany. For the first time, robots are working alongside humans without guards or other safety barriers between them.
Universal Robots

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 5:24 pm

Robots are working alongside humans on car production lines, taking what Technology Review calls "a huge step toward revolutionizing the role of robots" at car factories. Previously, robots had been seen as being too unsafe to place them shoulder-to-arm-joint with humans on the assembly line.

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The Two-Way
3:48 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Alleged Navy Yard Shooter Got Clearances Despite Troubled Past

Police say Aaron Alexis, who was killed Monday, gunned down 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard.
FBI Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 4:44 pm

A day after police say a 34-year-old civilian contractor and ex-Navy reservist killed 12 people at the Washington Navy Yard, questions are being asked about how a man with a troubled service record and signs of mental instability had clearance to be on base.

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The Two-Way
3:36 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Stephen Hawking Backs Assisted Suicide For The Terminally Ill

British scientist Stephen Hawking appears during the opening ceremony of the London 2012 Paralympic Games in London last year.
Leon Neal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 4:54 pm

Cosmologist Stephen Hawking, who has lived for years with the progressive and debilitating motor neuron condition known as Lou Gehrig's disease, tells the BBC that he favors assisted suicide for people with terminal illnesses.

Hawking, 71, who uses a wheelchair and speaks through a computer speech synthesizer activated by his eye movements, said: "We don't let animals suffer, so why humans?"

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Code Switch
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

How Slavery Shaped America's Oldest And Most Elite Colleges

An early flier for an event at King's College --” which would later become Columbia University — included an advertisement for a slave auction.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 6:45 pm

A few years ago, Brown University commissioned a study of its own historical connection to the Atlantic slave trade. The report found that the Brown family — the wealthy Rhode Island merchants for whom the university was named — were "not major slave traders, but they were not strangers to the business either."

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Books
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

A Brazilian Writer's Love Letter To Rio De Janeiro

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, shown just before sunrise.
Christophe Simon AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 4:55 pm

While NPR's Melissa Block is in Brazil, we'll be showcasing the work of several Brazilian writers. Today: Tatiana Salem Levy, whose short story "Blazing Sun" was featured in the literary magazine Granta. Levy splits her time between Rio de Janeiro, where she's spent most of her life, and Lisbon, where she was born. She calls "Blazing Sun," which is excerpted below, her love letter to Rio.

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Politics
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Frontrunner For Fed Chair Saw Financial Crisis Coming

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

Now that Larry Summers has withdrawn his name from consideration to lead the Federal Reserve, Janet Yellen, Vice Chair of the Fed, has emerged as the frontrunner. For more on Yellen and her career, Audie Cornish talks with Alan Blinder, a professor of economics at Princeton University.

Latin America
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Brazil President Postpones U.S. Visit After NSA Revelations

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

In a slap to the United States, Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff announced she is postponing her state visit to Washington. It was scheduled for Oct. 23 and would have been the first state visit of President Obama's second term. The postponement follows revelations that the National Security Agency spied on Rousseff, her top aides and Brazil's state-run oil company.

Economy
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Census Report Paints Troubling Economic Picture On Incomes

Raisa Ruiz (right) and her niece Mary Badels wait in line at the Manna Food Center, Gaithersburg, Md., on Sept. 13.
Chloe Coleman NPR

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

For the first year since the recession, median household incomes did not decline in 2012. But it's hardly a reassuring picture. Incomes were flat despite the economic recovery and big gains in the stock market. That's a troubling aspect about today's labor market. It's four years since the official end of the recession and many households are worse off than when it started.

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Media
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

Why Outlets Often Get It Wrong In Breaking News Coverage

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

As news traveled about the mass shootings at the Navy Yard, there were some missteps by the media. At first, some news outlets reported there were up to three different gun men. So far, that's turned out not to be the case. There were reports that there was a second shooting at Bolling Air Force Base, that turned out not to be the case.

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Economy
3:18 pm
Tue September 17, 2013

CBO Report: Long-Term Deficit Picture Gloomy

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 3:34 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office just added fuel to the fire already raging in Washington over what to do about the deficit. A new CBO study paints a grim picture of the nation's long-term debt and deficit.

NPR's Tamara Keith reports that despite three years of fighting over it, Congress hasn't done much to improve things.

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