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Around the Nation
2:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Powerful 'Polar Vortex' Makes Rare Appearance In U.S.

Jason Samenow, The Washington Post's weather editor and chief meteorologist of the Capital Weather Gang, tells Robert Siegel about the weather phenomenon known as the "polar vortex." It means frigid temperatures and wind chill in much of the country.

Around the Nation
2:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Dangerously Low Wind Chills Pummel Much Of U.S.

"Historic" โ€” that's one of the terms being used to describe the brutally cold temperatures across the Midwest and other parts of the country. Some temperatures are the lowest recorded in two decades, many in the single digits or below zero with wind chills predicted as low as minus 50.

NPR News Investigations
2:27 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Army Takes On Its Own Toxic Leaders

NPR interviewed dozens of current or former soldiers who said they have struggled under toxic leaders.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 9:15 am

Top commanders in the U.S. Army have announced publicly that they have a problem: They have too many "toxic leaders" โ€” the kind of bosses who make their employees miserable. Many corporations share a similar problem, but in the Army's case, destructive leadership can potentially have life or death consequences. So, some Army researchers are wondering if toxic officers have contributed to soldiers' mental health problems.

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All Songs Considered
2:00 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Question Of The Week: What Are Your Music Resolutions For 2014?

NPR

I began last year with some ambitious goals as far as music goes. I vowed to go to more live shows, to pay more attention to lyrics and to spend more time in general with the albums I hear. This was in addition to losing weight, writing a novel and quitting World Of Warcraft. (Ha ha, just kidding! Why would anyone quit World Of Warcraft?).

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The Salt
1:54 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Ignatius R

No mouths were harmed in the eating of this sandwich. Except Eva's รขย€ย” she wants Worker's Comp for a bad case of Sandwich Jaw.
NPR

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:01 pm

It's -16 degrees today here in Chicago, which for many of us has triggered hibernation mode. Fortunately the great Jerry's Sandwiches has created the Ignatius R., with enough calories to get us to the end of winter, which we expect to occur sometime in August.

The ingredient list: fried chicken, cold hickory-smoked sirloin, applewood bacon, fresh mozzarella, lettuce, Carolina vinegar, fried shrimp, fried green tomato, mortadella, country ham, pickled okra, American cheese, lettuce, tomato, and Southwest mayo on a potato bun.

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The Salt
1:22 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Looks Like The Paleo Diet Wasn't Always So Hot For Ancient Teeth

Say aaaaaah! Dental caries and other signs of oral disease are plain to see in the upper teeth of this hunter-gatherer, between 14,000 and 15,000 years old. The findings challenge the idea that the original paleo diet was inherently healthy, says paleo-anthropologist Louise Humphrey. It all depended, she says, on what wild foods were available.
Courtesy of Isabelle De Groote

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 4:16 pm

One of the hinge points in human history was the invention of agriculture. It led to large communities, monumental architecture and complex societies. It also led to tooth decay.

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Shots - Health News
1:08 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Frostbite Tips For Novices: Skip Whiskey And Shed Your Rings

Jenny Hackett walks across a street in St. Louis, Mo., on Sunday. Subzero temperatures are predicted there Monday, with bitter cold sweeping east.
Jeff Roberson AP

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 6:38 am

Frostbite isn't usually a major worry here in Washington, D.C., but with wind chills below zero forecast for half of the Lower 48 by Tuesday morning, millions of people from the Plains to the East Coast will have to start thinking like Arctic explorers while waiting for a school bus or heading to work.

Noses, fingers, toes and ears face the biggest risk. Those body parts have less blood flowing through them and a lot less mass than the body's core. They're also more likely to be exposed to the elements. Obviously, bundling up those tender parts is key.

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The Two-Way
12:16 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Boeing Delivers Record Number Of Jetliners In 2013

A Boeing 787-9 lands after its first flight on September 17, 2013 at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington. The aircraft maker delivered 65 of the new jetliners last year.
Stephen Brashear Getty Images

Boeing delivered a record 648 commercial jetliners last year, including 65 of its newest 787s and also had a record backlog of 5,080 unfulfilled orders.

The 2013 deliveries were expected to keep Boeing in the No. 1 slot for the second year, nudging out rival Airbus, which is expecting to report 620 deliveries.

"The Boeing team performed extremely well in 2013," CEO Ray Conner said.

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Author Interviews
12:05 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Fear Of Fainting, Flight And Cheese: One Man's 'Age Of Anxiety'

Yuri Arcurs iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 6:09 pm

Atlantic magazine editor Scott Stossel has countless phobias and anxieties โ€” some you've heard of, others you probably haven't.

"There's a vast encyclopedia of fears and phobias," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross, "and pretty much any object, experience, situation you can think of, there is someone who has a phobia of it."

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The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Mon January 6, 2014

Deadly Violence Mars Elections In Bangladesh

Bangladeshi protesters burn election material Sunday at a polling station in the northern town of Bogra.
AFP/Getty Images

Bangladesh's parliamentary election Sunday proved to be among the most violent vote in the country's short history. At least 18 people were killed, including an election officer who was beaten to death, and scores of polling stations firebombed, according to local media reports.

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The Two-Way
11:55 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Last Game Is Finally Here: BCS May Go Out With A Bang

Look, But Don't Touch, Part I: Some players are superstitious and don't want to touch a trophy until they win it. Florida State defensive back Jonathan Akanbi poses with the NCAA's Coaches' Trophy, which goes to the winner of Monday night's game.
Chris Carlson AP
  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Tom Goldman previews the championship game

There are obviously many things that could be said about Monday night's Bowl Championship Series game between No. 1 Florida State and No. 2 Auburn, starting with this:

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The Two-Way
11:25 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Ending 20-Year Era, Boston Welcomes A New Mayor

Mayor-elect of Boston, Marty Walsh (right), takes the oath of office Monday in Conte Forum at Boston College.
Michael Dwyer AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 11:49 am

A two-decade era came to an end Monday in Boston.

Thomas Menino, 71, left a job he had held since 1993. And Marty Walsh was sworn in as the city's new mayor.

Walsh and his early appointments, NPR member station WBUR reports, signal the "the emergence of a new Boston โ€” younger and more diverse โ€” in city politics."

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Television
11:16 am
Mon January 6, 2014

'Downton' Returns, And It's As Rich As Ever

Michelle Dockery's Lady Mary is in deep mourning as Downton Abbey returns for a fourth season on PBS.
Nick Briggs Carnival Film & Television Limited

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 5:36 am

When you think about what Downton Abbey has achieved, and is continuing to pull off, it's actually pretty remarkable. In an era when the most acclaimed TV series of the decade is an edgy cable drama about a dying, meth-making criminal, Downton Abbey draws similarly large audiences on broadcast TV โ€” public TV, at that โ€” with an old-fashioned soap opera about servants and household staffers and those they serve. As Season 4 begins on PBS, Downton Abbey is the most popular drama in the history of public television.

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Around the Nation
10:42 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Stories To Watch In 2014

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Politics
10:42 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Reframing The Immigration Conversation For 2014

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, high unemployment in the U.S. is an ongoing political issue - one reason lawmakers right now are starting to talk about extending long-term unemployment benefits. But younger workers have been particularly hard hit during the world-wide economic slowdown. We're going to take a look how youth unemployment around the world is affecting political discussions. That's in just a few minutes.

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Economy
10:42 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Global Youth Unemployment: Ticking Time Bomb?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Switching gears now. Unemployment for young people is another one of those contentious political issues as well as a burden for people living through it. Overall, the unemployment rate in the U.S. is just over 7 percent, but for younger workers it's much higher. For some young workers or would-be workers in sub-groups like black teens, unemployment is at depression levels. But what you might not know is that youth unemployment is a global concern.

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Law
10:28 am
Mon January 6, 2014

In One Man's Story, Two Sides Of The Immigration Debate

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 10:42 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
10:27 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Immigrant Turned Entrepreneur: 'Taco Stand Was My School'

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 10:42 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
10:18 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Dennis Rodman: North Korea Is 'Not That Bad'

Former NBA basketball player Dennis Rodman waits to check in for his flight to North Korea after his arrival at Beijing's international airport on Monday.
Wang Zhao AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 10:46 am

As he headed to North Korea for what he calls "basketball diplomacy," former NBA star Dennis Rodman wants you to know that what human rights groups consider one of the most repressive countries in the world is "not that bad."

Rodman gave an interview to The Associated Press before he took off for North Korea from China with a few former NBA players.

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The Two-Way
10:13 am
Mon January 6, 2014

'Jihad Jane' Gets 10 Years In Prison

Colleen LaRose, a.k.a. Jihad Jane.
AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 3:56 pm

The Pennsylvania woman known as "Jihad Jane" has been sentenced to 10 years in prison for her role in a failed al-Qaida plot to kill a Swedish artist.

Reuters writes that "Colleen R. LaRose, 50, could have received a life sentence [but] has given authorities significant help in other terrorism cases since her 2009 arrest, prosecutors said."

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The Two-Way
9:45 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Story That Kim Jong Un Fed Uncle To Dogs Was Probably Satire

People watch a TV news program showing North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, right, and Kim's uncle, Jang Song Thaek, circled in red, at the Seoul Railway Station in South Korea on Dec. 3.
Ahn Young-joon AP
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The Two-Way
9:28 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Supreme Court Halts Gay Marriages In Utah

Ruth Hackford-Peer, right, and Kim Hackford-Peer are married by Rev. Curtis Price, while hugging their two children in the lobby of the Salt Lake County Clerk's Office on Dec. 20.
Kim Raff AP

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 3:02 pm

This post was last updated at 1:42 p.m. ET.

The United States Supreme Court has put same-sex marriages on hold in the state of Utah.

The order issued by the court on Monday halts same-sex marriages until an appeal is decided by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 10th Circuit.

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Movie Reviews
9:19 am
Mon January 6, 2014

From 'Cinema Paradiso' Director, An Offbeat 'Offer'

Geoffrey Rush plays an obsessive art auctioneer in The Best Offer, a mystery-cum-romance from the director of Cinema Paradiso.
Stefano Schirato IFC Films

A stylish if ultimately silly attempt to marry erotic puzzler and art-world critique, The Best Offer benefits from assured performances and an agreeably nutty Ennio Morricone score. The movie plays as if director Giuseppe Tornatore (best known for Cinema Paradiso) is doing all he can with a dubious script. But he's the one who wrote it.

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Toast Of The Nation
9:19 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Wynton Marsalis Septet: Live In New York

The Wynton Marsalis Septet.
Frank Stewart Courtesy of Jazz at Lincoln Center

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 3:15 pm

Much as families reunite around the holidays, Jazz at Lincoln Center's artistic director Wynton Marsalis convened his own family reunion of sorts at the end of the year. His septet(s), his working configuration of the 1990s and easily among his best bands, gathered anew for a six-night run to cap the year โ€” including New Year's Eve. The four-horn frontline showcases Marsalis the arranger; the rhythm section floats it with buoyant bounce. Along with WBGO host Josh Jackson, the septet rang in 2014 at Dizzy's Club Coca-Cola in New York.

Set List

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The Two-Way
9:15 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Missing N.Y. Man Found In D.C., Thanks To AP Photograph

Nicholas Simmons in the photo that helped his family find him.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

A photograph published Sunday by USA Today along with a story about the frigid weather sweeping across much of the nation led to the discovery of a man from western New York state who had been missing since New Year's Day.

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Monkey See
8:44 am
Mon January 6, 2014

The Unreal 'Her'

The screen is the announcement of a message from Samantha in Spike Jonze's Her.
Warner Brothers Pictures

There is something prickly and provocative about the back story of Spike Jonze's Her, a futuristic drama in which a man named Theodore (Joaquin Phoenix) falls in love, as it were, with his artificially intelligent operating system.

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Was Luck's TD The Most Amazing Moment Of A Wild NFL Weekend?

Indianapolis Colts quarterback Andrew Luck dives over the goal line in the fourth quarter of his team's 45-44 victory over the Kansas City Chiefs.
David Eulitt MCT/Landov

Originally published on Mon January 6, 2014 10:50 am

It's hard to imagine a much more dramatic weekend of NFL playoff games.

There was the big comeback by the Indianapolis Colts, who had fallen 28 points behind the Kansas City Chiefs.

Indy bounced back to win a 45-44 thriller.

The game included arguably the most amazing play of the weekend: Colts quarterback Andrew Luck's touchdown late in the fourth quarter when he picked up a ball that had bounced off a teammate's shoulder. Luck dove toward the end zone and managed to just stretch across the goal line.

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Parallels
8:03 am
Mon January 6, 2014

In Fast-Changing China, Reality Can Overtake Fiction

Qiu Xiaolong in his ancestral house during a visit from his home in St. Louis.
Frank Langfitt/NPR

Originally published on Tue January 7, 2014 7:03 pm

One of the challenges of writing about China is the country moves fast โ€” sometimes faster than the publishing business. Take Enigma of China, the latest detective novel by Chinese-American author Qiu Xiaolong.

In one scene, Qiu's main character, Inspector Chen, sits in a Shanghai restaurant scanning a hotel where government agents are holding a corrupt official in secret detention.

Recently, Qiu took me on a tour of the book's real-life settings, including the site of that eatery.

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Monkey See
7:11 am
Mon January 6, 2014

Morning Shots: Fiction, Tweet Advertising, And Marvel Envy

iStockphoto.com

I have a few quibbles with this lengthy profile/evaluation of Jennifer Weiner in The New Yorker, particularly in that it makes the common error of describing her argument as primarily about why her own books are not considered literary fiction, when in fact a major part of her argument is that commercial/genre fiction market

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