NPR News

Pages

The Salt
2:11 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Shutdown Leaves Program Feeding Women And Infants In Lurch

At a farmers market in Washington, D.C., recipients of federal food assistance like the WIC program can use vouchers to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.
Dan Charles NPR

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 3:23 pm

Among those affected by the chaos of the government shutdown are 9 million low-income women and children who may be worrying where next week's meal is going to come from.

They rely on the government for food assistance through the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, known as WIC.

Read more
Code Switch
2:03 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

A Rapid Shift For Jews Away From Religion, But Not Jewishness

Are Jews becoming less religious because they're marrying non-Jews or are they marrying non-Jews because they're becoming less religious? It's hard to say.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 10:49 am

A big survey by the Pew Center is out today on Jewish life in America, and it shows a stark shift away from religious belief and toward cultural identification.

Nine in 10 American Jews born before World War II identify themselves as Jewish by religion, but nearly a third of Jewish millennials — that is, people born after 1980 — identify as having no religion at all.

Read more
The Two-Way
2:00 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

How The Shutdown Is Affecting The Military

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 4:52 pm

Larry Abramson, who covers national security for NPR, sent us this missive, about how the shutdown of the federal government is affecting the Pentagon:

If you are a soldier, sailor, airman or marine, you will be paid during a shutdown. But only half of civilian defense workers are supposed to show up for work, and the rest do not get paid.

Read more
Deceptive Cadence
1:54 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Minnesota Orchestra Conductor Resigns After Carnegie Hall Cancellations

Conductor Osmo Vanska, who resigned his post at the Minnesota Orchestra this morning.
Todd Buchanan Courtesy of the Minnesota Orchestra

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 9:14 am

The latest chapter in the saga of the Minnesota Orchestra closed at a perilous point Tuesday morning, with its widely beloved conductor, Osmo Vänskä, announcing his resignation.

Read more
A Blog Supreme
1:51 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Ravi Coltrane's Favorite 'Ice Cream' Flavor

Ravi Coltrane's favorite tune off his most recent album, Spirit Fiction, was written by longtime collaborator Ralph Alessi.
Deborah Feingold Courtesy of the artist

Like a piece of gym equipment that always yields a great workout, most musicians have favorite tunes. For saxophonist Ravi Coltrane, "Who Wants Ice Cream" by trumpeter Ralph Alessi has proven especially fertile, drawing him back again and again since he recorded it as part of the album Spirit Fiction.

Read more
All Tech Considered
1:48 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Agency Websites Shut Down With The Government

The message users will get when they try to go to Census.gov during the shutdown.
Census.gov

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:50 pm

If you or your child has a school report due tomorrow, the Census Bureau site will not be available to help. Census.gov and its affiliates, like American FactFinder and online surveys, are offline as part of the federal government's shutdown. The same goes for the Federal Trade Commission's site, the Agriculture Department's USDA.gov and the Library of Congress' site, which can also be a rich resource of reference information.

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:22 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

For Middle-Aged Women, Stress May Raise Alzheimer's Risk

Stressed out? Who isn't? Stress can cause physical changes in the brain that may be linked to Alzheimer's.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 3:27 pm

Like most middle-aged women, I am stressed out. The work, the family, the aging parents — all things that jolt me awake at 3 a.m.

Does this mean I'm setting myself up for Alzheimer's in old age? Well, maybe.

Researchers in Sweden say that women who reported stress in midlife from experiences like divorce or a family member's illness were more likely to have dementia or Alzheimer's disease in old age.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:16 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

No Talks Underway To Resolve Shutdown

A sign announces the closing of the Statue of Liberty on Tuesday.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 4:53 pm

If you're wondering how long the shutdown will last, well, don't hold your breath.

As of this writing, there are no indications that talks are underway — or even in the offing.

Indeed, the Democratic-controlled Senate rejected House legislation Tuesday morning calling for a House-Senate conference to try to settle the disagreement behind the first federal government shutdown in 17 years.

Read more
The Salt
12:33 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

These Folks Went Vegetarian Back When It Was Way Uncool

This gang founded Zurich's Vegetarians' Home and Teetotaller Cafe in 1898. Ambrosius Hiltl bought the joint and changed the name in 1903.
Courtesy Hiltl

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 2:09 pm

These days, many people wear their vegetarianism as a badge of honor — even if it's only before 6 p.m, as food writer Mark Bittman advocates. (Actually, he wants us to go part-time vegan.) There's even a World Vegetarian Day, which happens to be today, FYI.

Read more
Food
12:20 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

300 Sandwiches: The Secret To Boyfriend's Heart?

"Weekend Productivity" Mozzarella and Homemade Pesto BLT
Courtesy of Stephanie Smith

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:56 pm

What makes a guy put a ring on it? New York Post reporter Stephanie Smith hopes 300 sandwiches will be her answer.

It all started after one particularly tasty turkey sandwich she made for her boyfriend. Smith says that the sandwich was so good, he said, "You're, like, 300 sandwiches away from an engagement ring."

So Smith got cookin' and is sharing her journey of food and love through her blog, 300sandwiches.com. It features a daily gourmet sandwich recipe.

Read more
The Two-Way
12:06 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

What Shutdown? WWII Vets Ignore Barricades To See Memorial

A World War II veteran visits the World War II Memorial on the National Mall on Tuesday.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 1:16 pm

Perhaps Congress can take a hint from these gentlemen:

Read more
Shots - Health News
12:04 pm
Tue October 1, 2013

Connecticut's Insurance Website Struggles At Opening

The online health exchange in Connecticut got off to a bumpy start Tuesday.
iStockphoto.com

Today is the day the uninsured can sign up for insurance on Connecticut's new health care exchange under the Affordable Care Act. But technical glitches have hampered the rollout.

Kevin Counihan is pretty good at managing expectations. He's the head of Access Health CT, the agency that runs the state's new health insurance marketplace.

He's got his eyes on 2016 and beyond. By then, he says, we'll be able to judge whether the health care overhaul has succeeded.

So, for him, Oct. 1 may be exciting, but it's not all that telling.

Read more
All Songs Considered
11:56 am
Tue October 1, 2013

New Mix: Fuzz, Danny Brown, Linda Thompson, More

Clockwise from upper left: Danny Brown, Fuzz, The Blow, Tom Brosseau
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:47 pm

On this edition of All Songs Considered, host Bob Boilen has a confession: everything in the world is actually a dream in his mind. (Just listen to the podcast, it will make sense.) If that's true, co-host Robin Hilton is grateful that Bob has at least imagined some great new music. You'll hear some of it on this edition of the program, including rapper Danny Brown, Swedish electronic duo Jonsson & Alter, and the beautiful voice of singer Tom Brosseau.

Read more
The Two-Way
11:36 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Don't Buy Rouhani's Charm Offensive, Israel's Netanyahu Tells U.N.

Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told officials at the U.N. General Assembly Tuesday that it's too early to ease sanctions on Iran, urging them not to be fooled by what he called a charm offensive by President Hasan Rouhani.
Stan Honda AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun October 6, 2013 7:04 am

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu took aim at Iran and its new president, Hasan Rouhani, in a speech at the United Nations Tuesday, saying that Iran is trying to fool the international community into easing sanctions on it, even as the country expands its nuclear program.

"Rouhani thinks he can have his yellowcake and eat it too," Netanyahu told the U.N. General Assembly, referring to yellowcake uranium, a concentrated form of the radioactive element.

Read more
Author Interviews
11:26 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Chris Matthews Looks Back On A Time 'When Politics Worked'

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:49 pm

Before Chris Matthews grilled politicians and their surrogates on his MSNBC show Hardball, he was a top aide to House Speaker Tip O'Neill, advising him on how to deal with the press. Now Matthews has written a new book drawing on those experiences, called Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked.

It's a look at how Speaker O'Neill and President Reagan managed to work together and reach compromise in spite of the fact that they disagreed not only on policy, but also on the role of government.

Read more
The Two-Way
10:39 am
Tue October 1, 2013

1 In 8 Suffers From Chronic Hunger Globally, U.N. Report Says

Schoolgirls eat a free midday meal in Hyderabad, India, last month. India has offered such meals since the 1960s to persuade impoverished parents to send their children to school. A U.N. report released Tuesday finds modest progress in the worldwide fight against chronic hunger.
Mahesh Kumar A. AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:17 am

Worldwide, roughly 1 in 8 people suffered from chronic hunger from 2011 to 2013, according to a new report from three U.N. food agencies.

They concluded that 842 million people didn't get enough food to lead healthy lives in that period, a slight drop from the 868 million in the previous report.

The modest change was attributed to several factors, from economic growth in developing countries to investments in agriculture. And in some countries, people have benefited from money sent home by migrant workers. But the gains were unevenly distributed, the report's authors say.

Read more
Environment
10:38 am
Tue October 1, 2013

When Islands Pop Out Of The Sea

Pakistanis walk on an island that emerged off the coastline of the Arabian Sea following a deadly magnitude 7.7 earthquake in Pakistan's southern province of Baluchistan on Sept. 24.
Gwadar local government office AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:46 pm

When a mud volcano erupted last week and created a muddy mound of an island just off the southern coast of Pakistan, it seemed to us like a rather rare development.

But it turns out islands crop up fairly often. Charles Darwin commented on one. And it's been happening in shallow marshy patches off the coasts of Sweden and Finland for millennia.

Darwin's Find

Read more
The Two-Way
10:37 am
Tue October 1, 2013

WATCH: Newborn White Lion Cubs In South Korea

White lion cubs at South Korea's Everland zoo.
VOA video

Originally published on Fri October 4, 2013 8:41 am

If you're suffering withdrawal symptoms from the National Zoo's "pandacams" — sadly deemed "nonessential" and therefore shut down, along with much of the rest of the government — we have the perfect antidote:

Read more
Food
10:33 am
Tue October 1, 2013

300 Sandwiches The Secret To Boyfriend's Heart?

New York Post reporter Stephanie Smith sparked a firestorm online when she wrote about her plan to make her boyfriend 300 sandwiches - in exchange for an engagement ring. Host Michel Martin talks to Smith about her project, and the reaction to it.

Pop Culture
10:33 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Reporting On The Shutdown, One Facebook Post At A Time

Craig Thoricht's wife Linda.
Courtesy of Craig Thoricht

Originally published on Wed October 2, 2013 8:26 am

Shutting down the government is nothing new; Congress did it 18 years ago, suspending federal operations for three weeks.

History suggests Americans will accept the inconvenience for the duration, and Congress eventually will find a compromise.

But what if history is bunk? What if what we think we know about government shutdowns doesn't apply to this one?

Read more
Law
10:33 am
Tue October 1, 2013

DOJ Voting Lawsuit: Absurd Or Critical?

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. My thanks to Celeste Headlee for sitting in for me on short notice. So today, the country woke up to the shutdown of the federal government. We've been hearing from you about how this is affecting you and your budgets and your families. We'll hear what you've been telling us and we'll hear from two of the business reporters we turn to often to find out what they're hearing about the long and short-term impact on the country. That's in just a few minutes.

Read more
Parenting
10:33 am
Tue October 1, 2013

When Teen Parties Go Viral

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 12:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Read more
The Two-Way
10:32 am
Tue October 1, 2013

8 Great 'Shutdown Pickup Lines'

The fun has begun.
Twitter

When a government shutdown loomed in 2011, the Twitterverse had some fun with #govtshutdownpickuplines.

They're back!

Here are some of the better, slightly naughty ones we're seeing (we also also checked #shutdownpicklines):

Read more
It's All Politics
10:07 am
Tue October 1, 2013

The Panda Cam? That's Shut Down, Too

A self-portrait taken by the NASA exploration rover Curiosity in Gale crater on Mars.
NASA AP

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:17 am

By now, you've probably heard that the federal government shut down at 12:01 a.m. ET Tuesday after members of Congress were unable to reach a budget agreement in time to keep the government funded.

Read more
The Salt
9:46 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Now You Can Go To Harvard And Learn Cooking Science From Top Chefs

YouTube

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:50 am

Read more
The Two-Way
9:18 am
Tue October 1, 2013

What's The Forecast On Kepler-7B? Hot And Cloudy

An artist's rendition of Kepler-7b (left) with Jupiter for comparison.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MIT

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 10:34 am

Scientists are reasonably sure that it's a cloudy day on Kepler-7b, a planet that orbits its star about 1,000 light-years away from us.

Using NASA's orbiting space telescopes, researchers publishing in Astrophysical Journal Letters say that for the first time they've been able to make a rudimentary map of the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet.

The team used faint visible light and infrared reflections from Kepler-7b to make their cloud map.

Read more
Music Reviews
8:54 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Dave Holland's 'Prism' Goes To 11, Elegantly

Left to right: Craig Taborn (piano), Dave Holland (bass), Kevin Eubanks (electric guitar), Eric Harland (drums).
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 11:26 am

The quartet on jazz bassist Dave Holland's new album Prism is more electrified, and usually louder, than bands he's led before. Some reviewers see its music coming out of his early work with the electrified Miles Davis, but the parallel doesn't go far. Holland played bass guitar with Davis, not his usual bass violin. Plus, early electric Davis was gloriously unruly, while Holland loves the elegance of interlocking rhythm cycles, wheels within wheels.

Read more
The Two-Way
8:27 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Snowden Is A Finalist For European Human Rights Award

Edward Snowden, seen here in a photo provided by The Guardian, is a finalist for the Sakharov Prize. Earlier this year, Snowden leaked classified information about secret U.S. surveillance programs.
AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 9:29 am

Edward Snowden, the former NSA contract worker who leaked documents detailing America's secret and broad surveillance activities, is on the short list of nominees for Europe's Sakharov Prize, which recognizes those who fight for human rights.

Other finalists include Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani schoolgirl who survived being shot in the head; and three political prisoners in Belarus.

Read more
Parallels
8:11 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Fearing Detention, Many Young Syrian Men Stay In The Shadows

Young men ride a horse cart in the northern Syrian city of Aleppo last year. Many young Syrian men stay indoors and off the street because they are afraid they may be detained as suspected rebels or rebel sympathizers.
Phillipe Desmazes AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 7:50 am

The author is a Syrian citizen living in Damascus who is not being further identified for safety reasons.

The young men of Syria account for many of those fighting on both sides of the country's civil war. Yet those on the sidelines of the conflict are facing heavy burdens of their own.

All over Syria, many young men, particularly those from rebellious towns, spend their days holed up at home to avoid running into trouble with the Syrian authorities.

Read more
The Two-Way
7:22 am
Tue October 1, 2013

Who Are The Two Republicans Who Crossed Lines?

Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Tue October 1, 2013 8:48 am

The Senate's votes have been along party lines when it comes to the so-called shutdown showdown.

And it's been mostly the same story in the House.

Read more

Pages