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6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Safety Experts Question Mental Screenings For Pilots

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Europe
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Germanwings Pilot Had Extensive Medical History

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Ex-Ambassador: Rebels In Yemen Exploited A Vacuum

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Middle East
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Expert: Iranians In Favor Of Nuclear Deal

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Africa
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Nigerians Vote In Tight Presidential Election

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
6:54 am
Sat March 28, 2015

A Day's A Day The World Around — But Shorter On Saturn

Saturn has a rocky surface, but it's deep beneath the clouds. That makes it hard to tell exactly how long the day is.
NASA

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 12:56 pm

Researchers have answered a question that has been nagging them for years: Exactly how long is a day on the planet Saturn? The result (10 hours and 32 minutes or so) was published this week in the journal Nature, and could teach scientists more about the giant, ringed planet.

A day is simply how long it takes a planet to spin all the way around. On Earth, one rotation takes 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4 seconds — though earthlings round up to 24 hours even.

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The Two-Way
6:25 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Pilot Who Downed Airliner Vowed 'To Do Something' To Be Remembered

A German police investigator carries a box after searching an apartment believed to belong to the crashed Germanwings flight 4U 9524 co-pilot Andreas Lubitz in Duesseldorf, on Thursday.
Wolfgang Rattay Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 12:53 pm

Updated at 11:05 a.m. ET

The co-pilot who deliberately downed an airliner over the French Alps this week, killing all 150 aboard, had told a girlfriend sometime last year that he would "do something" that would make people remember his name, a German newspaper reports.

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Author Interviews
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Hunting Mythical Monsters 'At The Water's Edge'

Emily Jan NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Maddie Hyde is a Sara Gruen heroine. She's bold, she's warm, and she's been cast out of Philadelphia polite society — in this case the family of her husband Ellis, who is 4F in the middle of World War II. To avoid the glares and scowls, and to earn their own way in the world after being cut off from a family fortune, they cross the Atlantic during a high tide of submarine warfare to try to burnish their family name by hunting down an older kind of monster in a Scottish village.

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The Salt
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Making Cheese In The Land Of The Bible: Add Myrrh And A Leap Of Faith

A Palestinian Bedouin girl milks a sheep in her family's makeshift camp in the West Bank. Herders live close to their animals, their main source of income.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

In spring, West Bank almond trees bloom white. Dry brown hills turn temporarily green and are dotted with bright wildflowers. The ewes and nanny goats of Bedouin herders that wander the West Bank eat well this time of year.

It's cheese season.

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Music News
5:39 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Influential Guitarist John Renbourn, Co-Founder Of Pentagle, Dies

John Renbourn performs onstage at the Royal Festival Hall in London June 29, 2008. The influential guitarist died at his home in Scotland Thursday. He was 70.
Barney Britton Redferns

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 11:41 am

Guitarist and composer John Renbourn co-founded the group Pentangle and went on to become revered by guitarists around the world. Renbourn was found dead of an apparent heart attack at his home in Scotland on Thursday, after failing to show up for a concert. He was 70 years old.

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NPR Ed
5:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Saying Goodbye: Reflections Of A Music Teacher

Jackie Zielke and eighth-grader Chartreanna Watson practice a guitar duet at Brady Middle School in Pepper Pike, Ohio.
Savion Gissentaner

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 11:58 am

This weekend, NPR Ed is featuring dispatches from teachers about the ups and downs of their work.

Early each December, the HR department of Orange City Schools in Pepper Pike, Ohio, places a checklist in our mailboxes. It asks about our employment plans for the next school year. Choices include sabbatical leave, acquiring advanced degrees, and the one everyone dreams of checking: I will be retiring at the end of the current school year.

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Goats and Soda
5:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Why South African Students Say The Statue Of Rhodes Must Fall

Students at the University of Cape Town are demanding the removal of the statue of British colonizer Cecil Rhodes.
RODGER BOSCH AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 11:47 am

For more than two weeks, public debate in South Africa has been dominated by a statue. Students at the University of Cape Town have been demonstrating to have the bronze figure of British colonialist Cecil Rhodes removed from its central position on campus.

Rhodes bequeathed the land on which the university was built, but he also slaughtered Africans by the thousands in colonial conquest and helped lay the foundations of apartheid in South Africa.

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A Blog Supreme
4:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Three Jazz Pianists, A Generation After Apartheid

Nduduzo Makhathini, from rural Eastern South Africa, connected to jazz as a way to heal others through music.
Ignatius Mokone Courtesy of the artist

In South Africa, the major art of resistance during apartheid was jazz: a melting pot where folk songs and hymns defiantly mixed with influences from South Asia, America and West Africa. South African jazz's central formula — its equivalent to the 12-bar blues — is a buoyant, four-chord progression that even seems to evoke a blending motion.

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Book News & Features
4:03 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Pour A Bucket Of Blood On These New Adaptations Of 'Carrie'

In Carrie The Musical, now being revived at a California theater, Carrie gets a jarringly Disneyesque song before her fateful prom.
La Mirada Theatre

Stephen King's Carrie (his first published work) is now more than four decades old, but it's never fallen out of pop culture favor. It was a fresh, horrifying look at the nightmare that could be high school, with a memorably mousy teenage protagonist who unleashed her telekinetic powers on her town.

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The Salt
4:01 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Guess What Makes The Cut As A 'Smart Snack' In Schools? Hot Cheetos

Frito-Lay reformulated Flamin' Hot Cheetos, a perennial favorite among school kids, to meet new federal "Smart Snack" rules for schools.
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 8:56 am

Flamin' Hot Cheetos might conjure a lot of descriptors: spicy, crunchy, unnaturally fiery red. But it's a good bet that "healthy" didn't exactly spring to mind.

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The Two-Way
3:57 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Germanwings Crash: 'Suicide' Doesn't Seem To Tell The Story

A stone memorial, surrounded by flowers, has been placed near the site in the French Alps where a Germanwings passenger jet crashed on Tuesday (March 24, 2015). Investigators believe the jet's co-pilot brought it down deliberately.
Jeff Pachoud AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 12:54 pm

As NPR reports about the crash of a Germanwings passenger jet and the deaths of all 150 people on board, one of the words editors are weighing carefully is "suicide."

Investigators have said they believe co-pilot Andreas Lubitz deliberately flew the plane into a mountain in the French Alps.

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The Seams
3:47 am
Sat March 28, 2015

Nigerian Artist Continues A Family Tradition With 'Sartorial Anarchy'

Robert Duncan poses with his wife, Karen, for New York photographer Iké Udé.
Iké Udé Courtesy of Robert and Karen Duncan

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 3:55 pm

On a recent night in Lincoln, Neb., aviation tycoon J. Robert Duncan hosted a party for the unveiling of two photographic portraits of him and his wife, Karen, whimsically attired in colorful dress from around the world. Their photographer is the Lagos, Nigeria-born, New York-based artist Iké Udé.

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Law
6:43 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

After Resuming Deliberations, Jury Rules In Favor Of Kleiner Perkins

Originally published on Mon March 30, 2015 9:20 am

The jury said that the venture capital firm Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield and Byers did not retaliate against former partner Ellen Pao by terminating her. The case has spurred conversation about gender discrimination in the tech world.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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The Two-Way
6:34 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

#NPRreads: Leaving Guantanamo, And Why Black People Don't Call Police

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 1:03 pm

#NPRreads is a new feature we're testing out on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom will share pieces that have kept them reading. They'll share tidbits on Twitter using the #NPRreads hashtag, and on occasion we'll share a longer take here on the blog.

This week, we share with you four reads.

First, one from Camila Domonoske, a producer for NPR.org:

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Code Switch
6:32 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Southern Baptists Don't Shy Away From Talking About Their Racist Past

Russell Moore preaching during the first plenary address, "Black, And White And Red All Over: Why Racial Reconciliation Is A Gospel Issue."
Alli Rader

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 8:52 pm

Southern Baptist leaders were supposed to be talking about bioethics this week at a summit in Nashville, Tenn. That changed in December after a New York grand jury declined to return an indictment in the police choking death of Eric Garner.

When Russell Moore, the president of the Southern Baptist Convention's Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission, sent out tweets expressing his shock, there was pushback. Should the church get involved in a divisive political issue?

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The Two-Way
6:04 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Jury Rules Against Ellen Pao, Clearing Kleiner Perkins Of Discrimination

A California jury has ruled against Ellen Pao by finding that Kleiner Perkins Caufield and Byers did not discriminate against her because of her gender nor did the venture capital firm deny her a promotion because of her gender.

Pao's lawsuit was the highest-profile gender discrimination case to come out of Silicon Valley.

USA Today reports:

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Movies
4:36 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

'The Breakfast Club' At 30: '80s Classic Still Relatable Today

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE BREAKFAST CLUB")

ANTHONY MICHAEL HALL: (As Brian Johnson) You see us as a brain, an athlete, a basket case, a princess and a criminal.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Photography
4:36 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

A Photo I Love: Featuring Astronaut Reid Wiseman

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:07 pm

As astronaut Scott Kelly launches into space Friday for what is a planned year-long mission on the International Space Station, NPR hears from fellow astronaut Reid Wiseman who was on the space station for four months in 2014. He discusses his photo of Italy at night from space.

The Salt
4:05 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Calif. Governor Can't Make It Rain, But Can Make Relief Money Pour

A worker kicks up dust as he drives a tractor at a farm on Aug. 22, 2014 near drought-stricken Firebaugh, Calif.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Can you spend your way out of an historic drought? Not really, but the consensus in Sacramento these days seems to be that money certainly helps.

Just days after it was introduced, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed his sweeping $1.1 billion emergency drought relief bill today.

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The Two-Way
3:51 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Italy's Highest Court Overturns Amanda Knox Conviction

Amanda Knox prepares to leave the set following a television interview on Jan. 31, 2014.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 11:17 am

Italy's highest court has overturned a murder conviction in the case of Amanda Knox.

The court's decision puts an end to a story that began in 2009 when Knox was found guilty of murdering 21-year-old Meredith Kercher two years earlier. The verdict was overturned in 2011. But a year later, the Court of Cassation overturned the acquittal and sent the case back to an appeals court in Florence. Last year, that court reinstated the original guilty verdict against Knox and her ex-boyfriend Raffaele Sollecito.

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NPR Story
3:44 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

As U.S. Energy Industry Booms, Oil Hubs Run Out Of Storage Space

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:07 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Asia
3:44 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

In Regulating Outdoor Dancing, China Tells Seniors How To Bust A Move

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 6:07 pm

China's sports bureaucracy threatened this week to standardize dancing in public squares. Government committees have for decades drafted standardized eye exercises for squinting school children, calisthenics for office workers and Tai Chi routines for retirees.

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Europe
3:44 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Pilot Association Raises Concerns About Germanwings Investigation

Originally published on Sat March 28, 2015 10:55 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

We turn now to Jim Phillips. He's the director for international affairs of the German Pilots Association. He joins us from Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport ahead of a flight. Welcome to the program.

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World
3:44 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Nostalgic Cars: Sour Automotive Fruit Of Cuban Embargo Gets New Life

Daily traffic in Havana resembles a vintage car rally, even if it does share the city streets these days Hyundais and Peugeots and rattletrap Russian Ladas.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Fri March 27, 2015 10:12 pm

In Havana, Cuba, the old cars that crowd the streets used to symbolize a stagnant nation. Now enterprising Cubans have begun renting cars out to tourists who are hungry for the cars of their youth.

During my reporting trip to Havana, I spoke with Julio Alvarez, the owner of Nostalgicar in Havana.

He joked that one thing Cubans should thank Fidel Castro for is all the old, majestic American cars that are now making him money.

You can listen to the story using the player above.

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The Two-Way
3:33 pm
Fri March 27, 2015

Thai Ruler Says He's Prepared To End Martial Law

Thai Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha attending the East Asia summit plenary session at Myanmar International Convention Center in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, in November.
Gemunu Amarasinghe AP

Thai leader Prayuth Chan-ocha, the army general who seized power in a coup last year, says that after 10 months of martial law, he's prepared to end it in favor of an equally draconian constitutional provision.

Prayuth says he's "thought it through" and will replace martial law by invoking a part of the the interim constitution that grants his government the same broad powers to suppress free speech and try civilians in military courts.

"[I] am prepared to use [the clause] to replace martial law. When it will be enforced depends on the situation," he says.

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