NPR News

Pages

The Two-Way
5:10 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mediator: Syria, Opposition Will Have Face-To-Face Meeting

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 11:48 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Deborah Amos reports from the Syria peace talks

Update at 12:36 p.m. ET. A Face-To-Face Meeting:

After arduous talks about talks, there seems to be some kind of breakthrough in Geneva, Switzerland, this afternoon: International mediator Lakhdar Brahimi said delegations from the Syrian government and its opposition will meet face-to-face for the first time on Saturday.

According to Reuters, Brahimi told reporters that both sides had accepted the principles of the Geneva Communiqué.

Read more
Poetry
5:02 am
Fri January 24, 2014

60 Years Of Poems Mix Anger, Ambivalence And Authority

detail from cover of The Poetry of Derek Walcott
Courtesy of Farrar, Straus, and Giroux

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 9:28 am

Derek Walcott, who won the Nobel Prize in 1992, is one of the biggest living figures on the world literary scene. He is a celebrated playwright and a painter, but a new selection of his work focuses on the achievement for which he is best-known: his poetry.

Walcott's home, and the gravitational center of his writing, is the Caribbean Island of St. Lucia, which was tossed restlessly between French and English colonial overlords for hundreds of years until it finally achieved independence in 1979.

Read more
Business
5:00 am
Fri January 24, 2014

David's Bridal Goes Upscale Near Beverly Hills

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

David's Bridal is famously known for carrying inexpensive bridal dresses, some for less than $100. Now the company wants to offer an elevated experience for brides to be — with chandeliers, marble tiling and plush chairs. There will be price tags to match — as much as 2,000.

The Two-Way
4:44 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Mobs Blame Muslim Brotherhood After Bombs Rock Cairo

A man carries an Egyptian police officer to an ambulance after Friday's blast at the Egyptian police headquarters in downtown Cairo.
Khalil Hamra AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:09 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Leila Fadel reports from Cairo

Update at 11:05 a.m. ET: There's been a fourth blast in Cairo. We've added that development to the top of this post.

Read more
Politics
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Boehner Picks Cathy McMorris Rodgers For GOP Rebuttal

Rep. Cathy McMorris-Rodgers, R-Wash., walks to a Sept. 2013 classified, members-only briefing on Syria in Washington.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:16 am

Tuesday night is the State of the Union Address — the biggest opportunity President Obama gets all year to speak to the American people about his priorities. There's also another speech that night — the GOP response. On Thursday, House Speaker John Boehner announced Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers from Washington State would deliver the official rebuttal.

Politics
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Why Small Town Mayors Face Multiple Disadvantages

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Hundreds of mayors converged on Washington, D.C. this week for the annual U.S. Conference of Mayors. There were some big names in the group: Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, New York Mayor Bill de Blassio. Also in the mix were mayors from some of the country's smallest towns and cities. NPR's Laura Sullivan spent the day with the mayor of Ville Platte, Louisiana, who, like most small town mayors, was trying to find a way to stand out in the crowd.

Read more
Politics
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Virginia's Gay-Marriage Decision Shows 'Disrespect'

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

Virginia's attorney general surprised the state's political circles on Thursday when he announced he will not defend Virginia's ban on same-sex marriage when it goes before a federal judge next week. Virginians had varying reactions to Mark Herring's decision.

Around the Nation
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Tea Party Voters In Idaho Don't Want Feds Intruding

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

In Challis, the debate is over the reach of Washington and how state land is used. Morning Edition has traveled to Idaho for one of the mostly closely watched political races this year.

Business
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drowning In Debt, Bike Sharing's Bixi Files For Bankruptcy

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

Montreal-based Bixi, which came up with the bike sharing systems offered in many American cities, has filed for bankruptcy. Renee Montagne talks with Andy Riga of the Montreal Gazette about where things went wrong for Bixi, and the future prospects of its operations in North America.

Business
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

MIT Housing Survey Focuses On 70 Metro Areas

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

A new report from the MIT Center for Real Estate forecasts home prices in 60 U.S. cities. Whether housing prices are going up or down depends on where you live.

Business
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Wal-Mart Creates Fund To Spur U.S. Manufacturing

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

The $10 million fund will supply grants to projects aimed at creating new processes and jobs in the sector. The fund will be launched in March, and Wal-Mart will fund the grants for five years.

Middle East
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Cynical Syrians Dismiss Peace Talks As Irrelevant

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

From a health center on the Syrian-Turkish border full of wounded fighters and civilians, the peace talks in Geneva seem a long way away. Some dismiss them as totally irrelevant to the conflict, saying none of the participants represent them. Others welcome anything that looks like it might bring peace closer.

Middle East
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Negotiations Begin At Syrian Peace Talks In Geneva

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

After the formal opening of the Syria peace conference in the Swiss resort of Montreux, government and opposition representatives begin negotiations Friday at United Nations headquarters in Geneva. International envoy Lakhdar Brahimi is mediating the talks.

Middle East
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Deadly Explosions Rattle Cairo

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

There have been three deadly explosions in Cairo on Friday. First, a car bomb targeted Egypt police headquarters in the heart of Cairo. The bombings come on the eve of the anniversary of the start of the 2011 uprising.

Around the Nation
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Small Museum Shows Off Weird Objects

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:29 am

In this encore report, we hear about a small museum in an elevator shaft in lower Manhattan. It's only six feet square, and only about three or four people can enter it at a time. The exhibits document the weird and wonderful of modern life, including prison contraband made from bread. (This piece originally aired on Jan. 2, 2014 on All Things Considered).

Around the Nation
3:57 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Drinking Water Not Tested For Tens Of Thousands Of Chemicals

Al Jones of the West Virginia Department of General Services tests water as he flushes faucets and opens a rest room at the State Capitol in Charleston, W. Va., on Jan. 13, four days after a chemical spill into the Elk River. It wasn't until Jan. 21 that state officials were told by Freedom Industries that a second contaminant had also entered the river.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:48 pm

The fact that a second contaminant in West Virginia's drinking water eluded detection for nearly two weeks — despite intense testing of the water — reveals an important truth about how companies test drinking water: In most cases, they only find the contaminants they're looking for.

Read more
All Tech Considered
2:07 am
Fri January 24, 2014

At 30, The Original Mac Is Still An Archetype Of Innovation

A 1984 Apple Macintosh Classic was on display at the Museum for Art and Industry in Hamburg, Germany, in 2011.
Philipp Guelland dapd

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 5:58 am

Read more
Shots - Health News
1:42 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Life-Support Battle Over Pregnant Texas Woman Heads To Court

Erick Munoz stands with an undated family photograph of himself, his wife, Marlise, and their son Mateo. Erick Munoz is now fighting to have a Texas hospital remove his pregnant wife from life support, saying she is brain-dead.
Courtesy Munoz Family MCT/Landov

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:38 am

The case of the Texas woman, 22 weeks pregnant and being kept on life-support machines at a Forth Worth hospital against her husband's wishes, goes before a judge in North Texas on Friday.

Marlise Munoz has been on respirators and ventilators since she was found unconscious in her home in November, when she was 14 weeks pregnant.

Read more
StoryCorps
1:41 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Giving Thanks For Two Bonus Decades Of Life And Love

Lionel D'Luna, daughter Adrienne and wife Debra remember their daughter and sister Alexis, who died in 2012 of complications from CHARGE syndrome.
Courtesy of the D'Luna Family

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 9:23 am

Alexis D'Luna was born with CHARGE syndrome, a life-threatening genetic condition. She was intellectually disabled, legally blind, had hearing problems and stood just under 5 feet tall because of deformities in her legs and back.

Read more
Planet Money
1:40 am
Fri January 24, 2014

When A $65 Cab Ride Costs $192

Update: Several readers commented on the route shown in the map above. Lisa Chow took the car for purposes of this story, and chose a route that began and ended near NPR's New York offices.
Lisa Chow

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 8:37 am

I was in the car for about an hour, rolling around Manhattan in the middle of a snowstorm. The ride normally would have cost me $65. But when it came time to pay, my driver, Kirk Furye, was concerned for me.

"Are you going to get in trouble with NPR?" he asked. "You are almost at three times the [normal] amount."

Final cost of a one-hour cab ride: $192.00.

Read more
Parallels
1:35 am
Fri January 24, 2014

Russians Fear A Sochi Legacy Of 'Black Widows,' Not Gold Medals

Shoppers at a department store in Sochi, Russia, pass an information banner with photos of suspected terrorists wanted by police. The color photo shows Ruzanna Ibragimova, the 22-year-old widow of an insurgent. Police say she has been spotted in recent days in central Sochi.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 6:51 pm

Two weeks before the Winter Olympics, Russian security forces are reportedly searching for potential suicide bombers, at least one of whom may already be in the host city of Sochi.

The suspects are thought to be linked to Islamist militants who are fighting to throw off Russian control and create a fundamentalist Muslim state in Russia's North Caucasus Mountains.

Police have been circulating leaflets at hotels in Sochi, warning about women who may be part of a terrorist plot.

Read more
It's All Politics
1:33 am
Fri January 24, 2014

8 Republicans And A Nunn Battle For Georgia's Open Senate Seat

The race for Georgia's U.S. Senate seat started to take shape Monday as Michelle Nunn, a Democrat, announced plans to run for her father's old seat, joining a crowded field of Republican contenders.
Kevin Wolf AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 11:12 am

Georgia Republican Saxby Chambliss won't be seeking a third term in the U.S. Senate this year, and his decision to bow out has eight other Republicans, including three congressmen, scrambling for his seat.

Democrats, meanwhile, have their hopes pinned on the daughter of a well-known and widely admired former senator. It's turned a Senate race Republicans hoped would be a cakewalk into something far less predictable.

Read more
The Two-Way
6:33 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Conservative Writer D'Souza Indicted On Campaign Fraud Charges

Prominent conservative writer and filmmaker Dinesh D'Souza has been indicted in New York on charges that he broke campaign finance laws. D'Souza, a vocal critic of President Obama, is accused of contributing thousands of dollars over the legal limit in a 2012 Senate race.

Another charge alleges that D'Souza, 52, made false statements about the contributions, which he is accused of routing through third parties. That charge carries a possible maximum punishment of five years in prison.

NPR's Peter Overby filed this report for our Newscast unit:

Read more
It's All Politics
6:05 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Latest 'Rising Stars' Highlight GOP's Outreach To Women

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus and RNC Co-Chair Sharon Day (third from right) introduce the group's latest "rising stars" Thursday in Washington: Alison Howard (from left), Chelsi P. Henry, Monica Youngblood, Kimberly Yee and Alex Smith.
Andrew Harnik The Washington Times/Landov

As if to underscore GOP efforts at outreach to female voters, a breakout session of the Republican National Committee's latest "rising stars" at the group's winter meeting Thursday in Washington, D.C., entirely comprised young women.

Read more
The Edge
5:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

A Baby Didn't Bump These Moms Out Of Competition

Malaysian shooting athlete Nur Suryani Taibi was eight months pregnant in 2012 as she prepared for the Summer Olympics in London.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:32 pm

Let's be clear: Olympians handle the physical challenges of childbirth differently than most of the rest of us.

Aretha Thurmond is a discus thrower who'd already competed in two Olympics when she went to the hospital in labor.

"So I get there and they're like, 'Yeah, whatever, you're 4 centimeters dilated. Go walk around the hospital and come back,' " she says.

Thurmond's hospital was part of a university, so she headed straight for its track, where she power-walked for the next two hours. Then the school's discus throwers came out.

Read more
Economy
5:09 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Study: Upward Mobility No Tougher In U.S. Than Two Decades Ago

The study did reveal widespread disparity in upward mobility based on geography. For those hoping to climb the economic ladder, San Francisco is one of the best places to live, the study found.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:32 pm

A new study finds that contrary to widespread belief, it's no harder to climb the economic ladder in the United States today than it was 20 years ago.

But the study did find that moving up that ladder is still a lot more difficult in the U.S. than in other developed countries.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:09 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Rat-Infested Ghost Ship Might Be Heading For U.K.

The Lyubov Orlova sits derelict at dockside in Newfoundland in October 2012.
Dan Conlin Wikipedia Commons

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 4:31 pm

A ghost ship full of diseased, cannibalistic rats could be nearing landfall somewhere in the British Isles.

No, it's not the plot for a new horror film. According to The Independent, the 300-foot cruise liner Lyubov Orlova, which has been drifting, crewless, around the North Atlantic for nearly a year since it snapped its towline en route to the scrapyard, might be moving east toward the English coast.

Read more
It's All Politics
4:06 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Tea Partiers Hope To Crash Sen. Graham's Re-Election Bid

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., questions a witness during an April 23 hearing on the use of drones on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 3:32 pm

This year marks the first time Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina has had to run for office since the emergence of the Tea Party. Graham has never faced much Republican opposition during his two decades in Congress, but this June, he's already heading into a primary with four Republican challengers who say he's not conservative enough for the Palmetto State. Voters say the race has become a battle for the heart and soul of the Republican Party in South Carolina.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:05 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

In Seattle, No Simple Answers For A Stalled Tunneling Machine

In this photo made with a fisheye wide-angle lens, "Bertha" is shown in July as it prepares to begin tunneling in Seattle.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 7:38 am

Ever wonder what happened with Bertha — the world's biggest tunneling machine, stuck under Seattle? We last checked in on the story right before Christmas, when engineers were preparing to send down inspection teams to identify the blockage. People (OK, the media) were having a grand time, floating ridiculous guesses about what the mysterious object might be. An old ship? Dinosaur bones? Bigfoot?

One month later, there's still no clear answer. Certainly nothing headline-grabbing.

Read more
Movie Reviews
3:32 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Sun And Water, And A Dangerous Brand Of Desire

Pierre Deladonchamps (right) and Christophe Paou anchor the dark thriller Stranger by the Lake, in which danger and desire become as tangled as in a Hitchcock classic.
Strand Releasing

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 4:49 pm

The lake in Alain Guiraudie's Stranger by the Lake is gorgeous — aquamarine, pristine, surrounded by pebbly beaches and dense woods. Families cluster on the far side of it, but on the side we see, there are only men. It's a gay cruising spot, frequented by mostly nude sunbathers and swimmers, many of whom come here often enough to know each other by sight if not by name.

Read more

Pages