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2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

On Obama's Agenda: Immigration, Inequality And Unfinished Business

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. President Obama heads to Capitol Hill tonight for his fifth official State of the Union address. After a challenging year, it's a chance for Obama to turn the page and lay out his priorities for 2014 ahead of this fall's midterm elections. We'll bring you full coverage of the speech later tonight. First, a preview of what the president is expected to say.

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Business
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

A Chinese Company Brings Hope To Former GM Workers In Ohio

An abandoned General Motors automotive assembly plant near Dayton, Ohio, will soon become home to Fuyao Auto Glass, a Chinese windshield maker.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

For years, industrial cities across the U.S. have watched factories pack up and leave, taking their operations to Mexico or China. But here's something relatively new: increasing numbers of Chinese companies are bringing manufacturing to the United States.

Just south of Dayton, Ohio, a Chinese auto-glass maker now plans to open up shop in what used to be a large General Motors truck plant.

The announcement is a big deal for this former factory town.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Cantaloupe Farmers Get Probation Over Deadly Listeria Outbreak

Eric Jensen, right and Ryan Jensen, brothers who owned and operated Jensen Farms, arrive at the federal courthouse in Denver in January of 2014.
Ed Andrieski AP

Two cantaloupe farmers who pleaded guilty to charges stemming from a 2011 outbreak of listeria that killed 33 people, were sentenced on Tuesday to five years probation and six months of home detention.

The AP reports:

"A federal magistrate also ordered brothers Eric and Ryan Jensen to each pay $150,000 in restitution and perform 100 hours of community service. Each read a statement in which they apologized but didn't show any emotion during the hearing.

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The Two-Way
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

China's Jade Rabbit Rover May Be Doomed On The Moon

The Chinese flag is seen in front of a view of the moon at Beijing's Tiananmen Square in December, when China's first moon rover touched the lunar surface. That feat was widely celebrated — but observers believe the rover has now run into serious trouble.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

China's new moon rover, the Jade Rabbit, may be dead. Chinese officials recently announced the rover was experiencing mechanical difficulties, and now observers believe it's done for.

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Economy
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Days Of Turmoil Test Stability Of Emerging Markets

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

After losing a lot of ground, stock prices were back up a bit today. Investor anxiety about the state of the world's currency markets seemed to ease. The current turmoil is reminiscent of the 1997 currency crisis in Asia, which hurt economies all over the world.

As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, there are also some big differences.

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Europe
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Comedian Runs Afoul Of France's Strict Laws On Hate Speech

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

French police raided the Paris offices and home of a controversial comedian today. The comedian is known by his stage name of Dieudonne, he's been accused of making anti-Semitic remarks during his performances, although he denies that. The French government has banned his current show, sparking a debate in France about the limits of free speech.

More from Paris and from NPR's Eleanor Beardsley.

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Middle East
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Free Speech In Egypt, Where A Tweet Can Mean Indictment

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Former President Mohammed Morsi is just one of many Egyptians facing charges for opposing the country's military-led government. Another is former lawmaker and political scientist Amr Hamzawy. He's been charged with insulting the judiciary in a tweet that he sent back in June. In it, he criticized a ruling in which a judge convicted several dozen nonprofit workers for plotting to destabilize Egypt. And Amr Hamzawy joins us now from Cairo. Welcome to the program.

AMR HAMZAWY: Thank you very much, Robert.

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Middle East
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

The Coup Goes To Court: Ousted Pres. Morsi On Trial In Cairo

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In Cairo today, former President Mohammed Morsi appeared in court for the second time since he was ousted in a military coup last July. The Islamist leader wore a white prison uniform and stood in a glass-enclosed cage. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, Morsi faces charges that could lead to the death penalty.

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Europe
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

German Economic Fears May Have Roots In Age-Old Prejudice

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to a debate in Europe over something called poverty migration. Recently, some countries in the European Union lifted work restrictions on Romanians and Bulgarians. As a result, factions in Britain and Germany worry that poor and unskilled immigrants will flood in and collect welfare payments.

But Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson reports, this debate isn't being driven by new arrivals from Romania and Bulgaria. Instead, she says, it may involve prejudice against one particular group, the long-oppressed Roma.

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Shots - Health News
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

In Vermont, A Network Of Help For Opiate-Addicted Mothers

As Vermont expands addiction treatment services, it is also coming to grips with one of the most difficult and emotional aspects of the problem: pregnant women addicted to opiates.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 8:44 am

It came as a surprise to many people when Vermont's governor recently devoted his entire 2014 State of the State address to what he called a "full-blown heroin crisis."

While it may not fit Vermont's bucolic image, the state's addiction problem has long been acknowledged. And as the state has expanded treatment, it's also been coming to grips with one of the most difficult and emotional aspects of the issue: addicted mothers.

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Around the Nation
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Deep South, Meet Deep Freeze

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Deep South is in a deep freeze. Snow, sleet and freezing rain have gripped a region more accustomed to sun and surf. As a result, roads are a mess and from South Louisiana to the Carolina coast, classes are cancelled, airplanes are grounded, and businesses and government offices are closed.

NPR's Debbie Elliott reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIRENS)

DEBBIE ELLIOTT, BYLINE: In Birmingham, Alabama today, just getting around town is practically impossible.

(SOUNDBITE OF SIRENS)

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The Edge
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

A Homemade Wooden Luge Track Launches Teen To Sochi

Tucker West started in luge when he was 6.
Brett West

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 9:10 pm

It's single-digit cold as Brett West steps into the snow in his backyard in Ridgefield, Conn., and points to a wooden monstrosity. It stands 32 feet high and looks kind of like a wooden roller coaster.

"The whole thing's made of wood — two-by-fours, four-by-fours and 3-quarter-inch plywood, all pressure-treated lumber, with a lot of screws."

The homemade track was the first training ground for his son, Tucker, an 18-year-old who is the youngest member of the U.S. luge team in Sochi.

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Code Switch
2:52 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Remaking All That Jazz From Shanghai's Lost Era

Electronic music producer Dave Liang and jazz singer Zhang Le collaborated on a new album of Shanghai jazz standards from the 1930s and 1940s.
Zhuang Yan Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:55 pm

You may not hear it when you're listening to Shanghai jazz standards from the 1930s and '40s, but dig deeper into their history and you'll find a generational skip in the record.

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Middle East
2:41 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

In Israeli Prison, An Elaborate Theater Of Interrogation

Ala'a Miqbel (shown here with his wife and their youngest son in their Gaza City apartment) was held for nearly four weeks in an Israeli prison, then released without charges. There, he met the "sparrows" — Palestinians who appear to be fellow prisoners but are actually gathering information for the Israelis.
Emily Harris NPR

Originally published on Wed January 29, 2014 3:09 pm

Ala'a Miqbel phoned his wife and his boss on the morning of Aug. 26 last year, just to say he was almost at the Erez crossing. That's the checkpoint between the Gaza Strip, where Miqbel lives, and Israel.

The U.S. Consulate had invited Miqbel to attend a conference in the West Bank. Although he'd been to Ramallah for work several years ago, Israeli security wanted to interview him before granting a travel permit this time.

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Planet Money
2:33 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Who Are The Long-Term Unemployed? (In 3 Graphs)

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Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 10:54 am

When you are out of work and looking for 27 weeks or longer, you become part of a group the Bureau of Labor Statistics calls long-term unemployed. The share of long-term unemployed workers hit its peak in May 2010, when 46 percent of the unemployed were long-term unemployed. It has hovered around 40 percent of the unemployed in the three years since.

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The Two-Way
1:00 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Illinois Train Conductor's Challenge: Keep The Beer From Freezing

In an Illinois railyard, train cars carrying beers such as Corona and Pacifico are at risk of spoiling their cargo if freezing temperatures take hold.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 6:18 pm

In a railyard outside Chicago, the deep cold of winter can threaten a Midwest staple: beer. The large distribution hub regularly holds more than 1 million cases, according to Crain's Chicago Business. A Crain's reporter spent a night on the job with the man who must keep the beer safe.

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Author Interviews
12:48 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Entrepreneurs Looking For 'Windfall' Cash In On Climate Change

A boat skims through the melting ice in the Ilulissat fjord in August 2008, on the western coast of Greenland.
Steen Ulrik Johannessen AFP/Getty Images

In 2008, as scientists documented a record melt in the Arctic ice and Al Gore's film An Inconvenient Truth was in theaters, a half dozen major investment houses launched mutual funds designed to take advantage of financial opportunities offered by climate change.

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The Fresh Air Interview
12:48 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Pete Seeger Remembers Guthrie, Hopping Trains And Sharing Songs

Pete Seeger.
Joe Kohen WireImage

Pete Seeger believed songs were a way of binding people to a cause. He popularized "This Land is Your Land" and "We Shall Overcome" and wrote "If I Had a Hammer." In 1940s, he co-founded The Weavers, who surprised everyone, including themselves, when they became the first group to bring folk music to the pop charts — until they were black listed. Seeger refused to answer questions about his politics when he appeared before House Un-American Activities committee in 1955.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

China Is Poised To Force 'Times' Reporter Out Of Country

In a move that's being seen as retaliation for negative stories about its leaders, China's government has told a New York Times reporter that he must leave the country when his visa expires Thursday. The government has not granted a request for a new visa that was made last summer.

The development comes despite objections from Vice President Joe Biden, who has urged senior officials in Beijing not to punish U.S. journalists with de facto expulsion.

From Beijing, NPR's Frank Langfitt reports for our Newscast unit:

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The Two-Way
11:52 am
Tue January 28, 2014

No, Queen Elizabeth Is Not Down To Her 'Last Million'

Queen Elizabeth II.
Kirsty Wigglesworth AP

Did you hear about Queen Elizabeth II? That times are tough for Britain's monarch?

Or as an inspired headline writer at Australia's Canberra Times put it:

Royal no longer flush — Queen 'down to her last million'

Well, don't schedule a telethon for her just yet.

The queen herself is not running out of money.

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The Salt
11:49 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Sushi Chefs Aren't Feeling California's New Glove Law

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 4:12 pm

On Sunday, we told you about bartenders who are up in arms about a new California law that makes it illegal for culinary workers to touch uncooked food with their bare hands. Turns out, sushi chefs are ticked off, too.

For sushi chefs, crafting sashimi or a great roll is a lot like creating art. It requires skill and feel. Bare hands are essential.

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Politics
11:33 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Top Moments In State Of The Union History

AP

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 3:47 pm

The annual State of the Union speech isn't just stagecraft: the message is mandated by the U.S. Constitution (trivia alert: Article II, Section 3). It's intended to give Congress a status update on the country and make recommendations where needed, but the tradition has evolved over time.

The history of the address is rich, even if the individual speeches sometimes seem fleeting and forgettable.

Who was the first person to deliver this presidential memo? (George Washington.)

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All Songs Considered
11:02 am
Tue January 28, 2014

New Mix: Wye Oak, Ratking, John Lurie, More

Clockwise from upper left: Holly Herndon, Ratking, Jenn Wasner and Andy Stack of Wye Oak, and John Lurie.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 11:19 am

On this week's show, host Bob Boilen has new magical powers. He's not sure what's behind these new powers, but it has something to do with a Romanian brass band and Tuvan throat singing.

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The Two-Way
10:42 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Philippine Police Used 'Wheel Of Torture,' Rights Group Says

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 10:51 am

Police in the Philippines played "wheel of torture" to dole out punishments to criminal suspects during interrogations, according to country's own Commission on Human Rights.

"They do it for fun, it's like a game for entertainment," Loretta Ann Rosales, the chair of the Commission on Human Rights said. "We're trying to correct this mindset based on a human rights approach to policing, but obviously it may take a lot of time."

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Super Bowl Tickets Are 'Cheap,' And Weather Isn't Only Reason

Tickets? Tickets? Anybody need tickets? Some are available to Sunday's Super Bowl in New Jersey at "bargain" prices.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 10:53 am

Sure, the game-time temperature's going to be in the low-30s or high-20s at Sunday's Super Bowl in New Jersey.

But brokers say that's not the only reason why tickets to the game aren't going for super-high prices on the websites where they're being resold.

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Shots - Health News
10:35 am
Tue January 28, 2014

College Students Can Learn To Drink Less, If Schools Help

Eighty percent of college students drink, and schools have had little success reducing those numbers, or the problems caused by excessive alcohol.
Toby Talbot AP

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 12:20 pm

Drinking remains one of the biggest health risks for college students, with 80 percent of students drinking alcohol and more than one-third binge drinking.

This may seem like an inevitable part of student life. But there's actually a lot that schools can do to help students get their drinking under control if they're willing to offer more than generic online courses, a study finds.

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It's All Politics
10:07 am
Tue January 28, 2014

What The Early State Of The Union Broadcasts Looked Like

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It's All Politics
9:57 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Obama's State Of The Union, Playing On A Second Screen Near You

A screen grab from last year's "enhanced State of the Union," which is also available Tuesday on WhiteHouse.gov.
Nathan Yau/Flowing Data

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 3:58 pm

Viewership is declining. Washington seems increasingly dysfunctional and irrelevant to the daily lives of Americans. The presidency isn't the bully pulpit it used to be.

In an age of social media and divided audiences, the annual, constitutionally mandated State of the Union speech is beginning to look like a stuffy relic from a bygone era.

It's an institution in need of a makeover, which is precisely what the White House intends to do Tuesday night.

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All Songs Considered
9:55 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Recommended Dose: The Best Dance Tracks Of The Month

Detroit luminary Moodymann is included in this month's Recommended Dose.
Courtesy of the artist

Welcome to the first edition of Recommended Dose, a monthly mix series for All Songs Considered that will collect our favorite new electronic music at the end of every month.

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Money Coach
9:51 am
Tue January 28, 2014

Scammers Taking Advantage Of Retail Data Breaches

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 2:34 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now it's time for our Money Coach conversation. You've heard by now about the problems at a number of retail stores like Target and Neiman Marcus, where hackers were able to access supposedly private information from the millions of customers who used credit and debit cards at the stores. But now there are people trying to take advantage of that chaos and scam you again. Here to tell us more is Sheryl Harris who writes for The Plain Dealer in Cleveland. Welcome back. Thanks so much for joining us.

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