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Shots - Health News
8:21 am
Thu February 13, 2014

With This Year's Flu, Young Adults Are Not So Invincible

A flu shot would have helped protect young adults, but most didn't get it.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:40 am

We usually think of the flu as an illness that afflicts the elderly. But this season the virus seems to be hitting younger people hard.

This winter at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., the median age of people hospitalized with influenza was 28.5 years. Many of the worst cases of flu occurred in young, otherwise healthy people.

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Monkey See
7:55 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Bob And Linda Read Internet Movie Reviews, Part 4: 'Gravity'

NPR

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:26 am

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The Two-Way
7:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

How Bad Is It For Fliers Today? Latest 'Misery Map' Shows

Here's where the misery was this morning, according to FlightAware.com.
FlightAware.com

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:11 am

With more than 5,000 flights into or out of the nation canceled today and hundreds more delayed because of the snow and ice storm moving up the East Coast, it's time once again to point to FlightAware.com's "Misery Map."

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The Two-Way
7:24 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Weekly Jobless Claims Rise, As Do Hopes For Better News In Spring

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 1:26 pm

There were 339,000 first-time claims filed last week for unemployment benefits, up 8,000 from the week before, according to the Employment and Training Administration.

So this week's takeaway would seem to be a lot like last week's and several before that.

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The Two-Way
5:57 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Afghans Release 65 Prisoners The U.S. Deems Dangerous

Afghan National Army soldiers stand guard at the main gate of the Parwan Detention Facility Center on the outskirts of Bagram. Afghan authorities released 65 prisoners from there Thursday.
Massoud Hossaini AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 1:03 pm

Afghan authorities on Thursday went ahead and released 65 prisoners from a high-security prison north of Kabul over the strong objections of U.S. military commanders, who say the men are dangerous terrorists who have attacked civilians and soldiers in the past.

As the Los Angeles Times writes:

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The Two-Way
5:43 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Book News: Slam Poet Maggie Estep Dies

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:26 am
Thu February 13, 2014

WATCH: Cameras Capture Corvettes Being Sucked Into Sinkhole

A glimpse of what it's like in the sinkhole that opened up Wednesday under a wing of the National Corvette Museum in Bowling Green, Ky.
National Corvette Museum

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 8:44 am

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The Two-Way
4:45 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Will Comcast Get Federal OK To Buy Time Warner?

Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 8:44 am

(We put a new top on this story at 9:25 a.m. ET and added an update at 10:15 a.m. ET.)

As NPR's David Folkenflik pointed out earlier today, Comcast's proposed $45 billion purchase of fellow cable company Time Warner will receive some scrutiny from federal officials. Here's some more about that part of the story:

Politico writes that:

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The Two-Way
4:03 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Winter Storm Shuts Northeast; South Still Reeling

Snow was piling up along Manhattan's Fifth Avenue early Thursday morning.
Carlo Allegri Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 6:13 pm

(We're adding details to this post as the day continues.)

The forecasters said it would be "crippling," "mind-boggling" and historic.

Well, this time around we can't complain about them getting it wrong.

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Music News
3:50 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Heavy Rotation: Shlohmo & Jeremih

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 6:22 am

Each month NPR Music asks public radio hosts and DJs to pick a favorite new song. Today we'll hear from Jason King, host of I'll Take You There, NPR Music's new 24 hour Soul and R&B stream. He's talking about his pick for Heavy Rotation: "No More" by Jeremih and Shlohmo.

Business
3:27 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Cable Deal: Comcast To Buy Time Warner

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Comcast has confirmed it is buying Time Warner. The merger would combine the country's two largest cable companies and likely draw scrutiny from regulators.

Business
3:26 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Businesses Hope Weather Doesn't Interfere With Valentine's Day

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

The snowstorm is also interfering with Valentine's Day. Mary Beth Reagan, owner of The Flower Pot in Knoxville, Tenn., says that day is very important to business and even a couple of inches of snow could be trouble.

Politics
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Big Changes To Employer-Based Health Care Won't Come Easy

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

Let's look for the truth behind some much discussed news about the Affordable Care Act. Congressional forecasters said last week that the law may cause fewer people to work full-time jobs.

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Business
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Pilot Shortage Forces Republic Airways To Cut Service

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Indianapolis-based Republic Airways has a problem: It can't find enough pilots to fly its planes. And so it plans to take more than two dozen of its jets out of service. Six months ago, the FAA boosted the number of hours it takes to qualify as a commercial pilot, and that has made it difficult for small, regional carriers to get the pilots they need.

Business
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Fed Chief Yellen Testifies Without Market-Moving Mistake

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

The new head of the Federal Reserve made her debut this week in a marathon hearing before the House Financial Services Committee. Steve Inskeep talks to David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center at the Brookings Institution about Janet Yellin's first days as chair of the Fed, and what message she sent to Congress in six hours of testimony.

Sports
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

In Front Of A Home Crowd, Russia Has Hockey History On Its Mind

Russia forward Alexander Ovechkin steps out onto the ice Thursday before a match against Slovenia. The Russians won 5-2. On Saturday, they'll meet Team USA.
Mark Humphrey AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 1:07 pm

There is a weird contradiction in Olympic hockey: On one hand, these professional players from the NHL arrive in a small town like movie stars.

They show up a week late, trailed by TV cameras and Russians begging for autographs.

And then they have to go back to basics. Early Thursday, members of Team USA were on the ice, doing the kind of simple drills that you'd see in a peewee hockey league.

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Africa
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

U.S. Tries To Limit Violence In Central African Republic

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

The Obama administration has devoted considerable resources to the Central African Republic. Renee Montagne talks to Samantha Power, U.S. ambassador to the U.N., about U.S. efforts to end the crisis there.

Africa
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Neither Christian Nor Muslim Is Safe In Central African Republic

Thousands of Muslim residents flee Central African Republic capital Bangui in a mass exodus using cars, trucks and motorcycles, escorted by Chadian troops, on Feb. 7.
Jerome Delay AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:53 am

Last year, Muslim militias helped overthrow the country's Christian president of the Central African Republic and marauded through Christian areas. Today, the circumstances are reversed, with Christian militias terrorizing Muslim communities and prompting a mass exodus.

French and African peacekeepers have mostly failed to stop the violence as the isolated country of 4 million continues to unravel.

Wazili Yaya, a Muslim, has witnesses the recent violence.

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Sports
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Where Does The U.S. Stand In The Olympic Medal Count?

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Speed skater Shani Davis is the latest star American athlete to miss the medal stand. He's joined by Alpine Skier Bode Miller, who didn't do well in his run and Shaun White, among others. We look at where the Americans stand in the medal count.

National Security
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

In Security Cases, Feds No Longer Get Benefit Of The Doubt

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
3:09 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Regardless Of The Weather, Don't Put Your Tongue On A Pole

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 5:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Science
1:03 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Ancient DNA Ties Native Americans From Two Continents To Clovis

Until recently, finding characteristic stone and bone tools was the only way to trace the fate of the Clovis people, whose culture appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago.
Sarah L. Anzick Nature

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 6:01 pm

The mysterious Clovis culture, which appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago, appears to be the forerunner of Native Americans throughout the Americas, according to a study in Nature. Scientists have read the genetic sequence of a baby from a Clovis burial site in Montana to help fill out the story of the earliest Americans.

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Politics
1:02 am
Thu February 13, 2014

'Citizens United' Critics Fight Money With Money

A woman signs a giant banner printed with the preamble to the U.S. Constitution during a demonstration against the Citizens United ruling in Washington in October 2010.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 9:19 am

It's been four years since the Supreme Court's controversial Citizens United ruling, the case that set the stage for unlimited and often undisclosed contribution money in federal elections. This year, the superPACs and social welfare organizations that use that money for attack ads are already at it, even as Republicans and Democrats are still choosing their candidates for the fall campaigns.

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All Tech Considered
1:01 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Through The Internet, Gay Teens Connected To Larger Community

Emily Kitfield, 16, says she's not sure if she would have been able to come out to her parents and community without being able to reach out to others online.
Courtesy of Emily Kitfield

In the past 20 years, the Internet has significantly impacted what it means to grow up as a gay kid in this country.

Before the Web, many gay young people grew up in what seemed to be isolation, particularly those in small towns. But with the advent of online chat rooms and Websites dedicated to gay culture, communities formed, and that demographic began finding new support.

That change can be seen in the experiences of two women who grew up in the same town, two decades apart.

'The Only One'

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Parallels
1:00 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Greeks Find Hope In The Theater Of Nostalgia

Greek vocal icon Marinella (center) sings "Children of Greece," a song once sung to Greek soldiers as Italian and German forces invaded the country. As they endure hard times today, Greeks are turning to theater that shows triumphs over adversity in the previous century.
Badminton Theater

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 12:23 pm

It's a full house at the 2,000-seat Badminton Theater in Athens. On stage is a musical about the singer Sofia Vembo, whose warm contralto voice comforted Greeks during World War II.

The song that is bringing the audience, mostly Greeks in their 60s and 70s, to tears and applause is called "Paida Tis Ellados, Paidia," or "Children of Greece." Vembo sang it to Greek soldiers as Italian and German forces invaded the country.

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Music News
12:03 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Collecting Money For Songwriters, A 100-Year Tug Of War

ASCAP CEO John LoFrumento, member Katy Perry and president Paul Williams at the 2012 Annual ASCAP Pop Music Awards in Hollywood, Calif.
Frank Micelotta PictureGroup

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 4:06 pm

A hundred years ago, the Italian operatic composer Giacomo Puccini was having lunch in New York with Victor Herbert, the leading composer of operettas in this country. Then, the band in the restaurant began playing music from Herbert's current hit, Sweethearts. Puccini became outraged, according to songwriter Paul Williams, the current president of the performing-rights organization ASCAP.

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The Two-Way
10:06 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Reports: Comcast To Buy Time Warner

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 10:22 pm

Comcast is expected to announce its acquisition of Time Warner on Thursday, various media outlets report.

Bloomberg, citing "four people familiar with matter," says Comcast will buy the cable company for about $44 billion, "combining the largest two U.S. cable companies in an all-stock deal."

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The Two-Way
7:09 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Winter Storm Paralyzes Roads In North Carolina, Despite Warnings

Traffic creeps along Wade Avenue in Raleigh, N.C., where commuters were caught on roads despite officials' encouragement not to travel.
Lance King Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:12 am

They knew it was coming. But drivers in North Carolina still fell prey to the winter storm that the National Weather Service predicted would be "potentially crippling" to the area. Even those who left just after noon have been trapped by the heavy snow that arrived today.

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Book Reviews
5:03 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Harrowing Memories, Intersecting Lives In 'Thirty Girls'

Susan Minot's previous books include Rapture and Folly.
Knopf/Random House

The central drama in Susan Minot's fourth novel comes from a real-life episode in October 1996, when 139 girls at St. Mary's College in Aboke, Uganda, were abducted by guerillas from the militant Lord's Resistance Army. The school's Italian headmistress followed the rebels into the bush and retrieved all but 30 of the girls — hence the title.

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