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8:38 am
Mon November 11, 2013

World Headlines: Iran, U.N. Nuclear Watchdog Set Road Map

Ali Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, shakes hands with Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, in Tehran, Iran, on Monday.
Ahmad Halabisaz Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 11:27 am

Iran, Press TV

Iran says it has worked out a plan with the U.N. nuclear watchdog on greater cooperation, including visits to the Arak nuclear facility.

Al Akbar Salehi, Iran's nuclear chief, and Yukiya Amano, the head of the International Atomic Energy Agency, announced the plan at a news conference in Tehran on Monday.

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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Amazon Taps Post Office For Sunday Deliveries; A Win-Win?

These could be on your doorstep some Sunday.
Paul Sakuma AP

Much of the talk in recent years about how the U.S. Postal Service could stem its huge losses has been about the things it might stop doing — most notably, delivering the mail on Saturdays (something Congress won't let it discontinue).

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Code Switch
8:19 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Sometimes The 'Tough Teen' Is Quietly Writing Stories

Matt de la Peña is the author of Ball Don't Lie, Mexican WhiteBoy, We Were Here, I Will Save You and, most recently, The Living.
Random House Children's Books

Originally published on Fri November 15, 2013 2:56 pm

A few years ago I did an author visit at an overcrowded junior high school in a rougher part of San Antonio. I write young adult novels that feature working-class, "multicultural" characters, so I'm frequently invited to speak at urban schools like this.

As is often the case, the principal and I talked as the kids filed into the auditorium. The student body was mostly Hispanic, he told me, and over 90 percent qualified for free and reduced lunch. It was an underprivileged school, a traditionally low-achieving school, but they were working hard to raise performance.

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Shots - Health News
7:26 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Sweat Your Way To A Healthier Brain

He feels smarter already.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:14 am

Moving your body may be the best way to protect your brain.

Physical exercise can ease depression, slow age-related memory loss and prevent Parkinson-like symptoms, researchers reported at the Society for Neuroscience meeting underway in San Diego.

The findings — some in animals, some in people — suggest that people may be making a mistake if they're relying primarily on crossword puzzles and brain-training games for mental wellness.

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The Two-Way
6:48 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Top Stories: Philippines Typhoon Wreckage; Veterans Day

Good morning, and welcome to Veterans Day. Here are our early stories:

-- 'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan.

-- Homeless Veteran's Makeover Goes Viral: VIDEO

And here are more early headlines:

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It's All Politics
6:40 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Monday Political Mix: GOP To Keep Obamacare Fans On Defensive

Veterans are often found at Washington's war memorials, like the one to U.S. service members who died in Vietnam, recalling lost buddies and lost youth.
J. David Ake AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:44 am

Good morning, fellow political junkies.

It's Veteran's Day 2013. Our deepest thanks to those who've worn the nation's uniform both home and abroad and made countless sacrifices to serve it with courage and integrity.

The House returns this week from a recess. Its Republican leaders will waste little time placing Democrats on the defensive and positioning the GOP as coming to the rescue of those beleaguered individuals who have received notices that their health plans were cancelled. The GOP-controlled House plans to vote this week on the Keep Your Health Plan Act of 2013.

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The Two-Way
6:32 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Homeless Veteran's Makeover Goes Viral: VIDEO

Jim Wolf of Grand Rapids, Mich. The Army veteran was transformed for a video that the maker hopes will convince people to look at the homeless differently.
Screen grabs from the RobBlissCreative video

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:18 am

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Around the Nation
6:03 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Doolittle Raiders Offer Final Toast To 71-Year-Old Mission

Staff Sgt. David J. Thatcher (left), Lt. Col. Edward Saylor (center) and Lt. Col. Richard Cole (right) stand at the Doolittle Raider Monument at Memorial Park in Dayton, Ohio.
Jerry Kenney WYSO

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:11 am

On April 18, 1942, in response to the Japanese attack the previous December on Pearl Harbor, 80 men in 16 B-25 bombers took off on a secret mission to bomb Japan. Led by James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle, they became known as the Doolittle Tokyo Raiders.

On Saturday, three of the four remaining Raiders met for what is likely to be the last time at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

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The Two-Way
5:58 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Book News: Postal Service Strikes Sunday-Delivery Deal With Amazon

USPS carrier Michael McDonald gathers mail before making his delivery run in February in Atlanta.
David Goldman AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:58 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:11 am
Mon November 11, 2013

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

From the air, some of the devastation in the Philippines city of Tacloban.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:17 am

  • On 'Morning Edition': From Manila, Lynette Lim of Save the Children talks about the typhoon

(Click here for related updates.)

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week's powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn't getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

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Europe
4:58 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Russian Subway Promotion Counts Deep Knee Bends

Riders are being offered a 30-ruble, one-ride ticket if they perform 30 squats. A machine counts your deep knee bends and dispenses a ticket, if you finish 30 in two minutes. It's a promotion ahead of the winter Olympics in Russia.

Around the Nation
4:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Bacon Deodorant: What Will They Come Up With Next?

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Linda Wertheimer.

We have bacon soda and baconnaise - that's bacon flavored mayonnaise. But apparently there are no limits to what bacon can be. Now we have bacon deodorant. The Seattle company J&D's Food has produced Power Bacon, a bacon-scented deodorant stick coming out just in time for the holidays. So for the bacon lover in your life, permission to sweat like a pig.

It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
2:42 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Western Media In China: Adjusting To The 'Anaconda'

An exterior view of the Bloomberg building in New York. Bloomberg staffers say editors spiked a story that exposed financial ties between a tycoon and family members of top Chinese officials.
Eduardo Munoz Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 1:15 pm

Last weekend was a bad one for foreign reporting in China.

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Asia
2:37 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Philippine Typhoon Leaves Hard-Hit Areas Suffering

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Supplies are desperately low after a massive typhoon hit the Philippines. Linda Wertheimer talks to Lynette Lim of Save the Children in Manila about the catastrophic typhoon.

Business
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Disposable Underwear Courtesy Of 3D Printer

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:07 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

And our last word in business is: underprints.

Shopping anywhere could take a hit if 3D printing really takes off, by allowing users to print products at home.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Yes, products like disposable underwear. It's the brain-child of an Israeli couple, whose 3D technology also enables them to print items like bandages or sportswear. Currently, the fabric printers run about $3 million, so maybe too steep for home use just now.

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Business
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Greek Shop Owners Resist Opening On Sundays

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

The Greek government is pushing stores to open on Sundays, just like the tourist shops around the Acropolis. But mom-and-pop shops that are participating in a pilot program to open seven Sundays a year, say they lost money last weekend — the first Sunday the program was effect.

Business
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Venezuelan Government Gets Tough On Price Gouging Retailers

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

In a pre-Christmas offensive to lower prices, the Venezuelan government has taken over a nationwide chain of electronics and appliance stores that it accuses of price gouging. That's led to huge lines outside the stores as shoppers snap up cut-rate refrigerators and computers. As Venezuela's socialist government combats surging inflation, it's warning that more takeovers are ahead.

Business
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Amazon Offers Sunday Delivery In Selected Cities

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Let's begin NPR's business news starts with Amazon Sundays.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: The U.S. Postal Service is breaking new ground, teaming up with the online retail giant Amazon in an exclusive deal to deliver Amazon packages on Sundays. Residents of Los Angeles and New York can now take advantage of the additional delivery day at no extra charge. The Sunday service is expected to expand to more cities next year.

The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Seeing Opportunity In A Question: 'Where Are You Really From?'

Alex Sugiura was featured, along with his brother and other mixed-race Americans, in the 125th anniversary issue of National Geographic Magazine in October. The brothers are of Japanese and Eastern European descent, but people often mistake Alex for Hispanic.
Martin Schoeller National Geographic

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 9:40 am

NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity for Morning Edition.

"Where are you from?"

"No, really, where are you from?"

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Middle East
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Iran Nuclear Talks Break, To Resume Later This Month

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

Negotiators from Iran and a six-nation group are scheduled to resume talks on Iran's nuclear program in 10 days. Talks ended on Saturday after an agreement was not reached on an initial proposal to ease international sanctions against Tehran in return for some restraints on its nuclear program.

Analysis
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Since Post-Vietnam Era, Fewer Veterans In Congress

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 4:35 am

The camaraderie that veterans talk about used to be true in Congress too — partly because many members had served in the military. But today's Congress has very few veterans in its ranks, about 20 percent, compared with more than three-quarters in the post-Vietnam era. What does that number mean politically.

Television
2:04 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Are Flesh-Eating Zombies The Future Of Television?

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 3:52 am

AMC's The Walking Dead has key ratings better than network dramas. The show gets desirable young viewers by not skimping on explicit action, gore or storytelling. So why haven't the networks tried to imitate the show? Blame the FCC, which cracks down on explicit network broadcast content but overlooks cable.

Fine Art
1:22 am
Mon November 11, 2013

In 1913, A New York Armory Filled With Art Stunned The Nation

Robert Henri's 1913 Figure in Motion was a realistic, but bold response to Matisse's and Duchamp's nudes.
Terra Foundation for American Art, Chicago, Ill.

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 1:08 pm

One hundred years ago in New York City, nearly 90,000 people came to see the future of art. The 1913 Armory Show gave America its first look at what avant-garde artists in Europe were doing. Today these artists are in major museums around the world, but in 1913, they were mostly unknown in America.

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Around the Nation
1:21 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Vets-Turned-Firefighters Find Brotherhood, Purpose

Probationary firefighter and veteran Victor Ramos practices driving the fire truck at the 16th Street Firehouse of the North Hudson Regional Fire and Rescue in Union City, N.J.
Melanie Burford for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 8:04 am

Veteran Chris Delplato wanted to be a firefighter for a long time.

"Ever since I was a little kid — [toy] truck and everything," Delplato says. But he only just got his dream job, after first joining the Navy and serving in the Persian Gulf.

He was hired by New Jersey's North Hudson Fire Department, which has brought on 43 veterans this year.

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Science
1:20 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Lessons In Leadership: It's Not About You. (It's About Them)

Ronald Heifetz draws on his training as a psychiatrist to coach aspiring leaders at Harvard's John F. Kennedy School of Government.
Ben de la Cruz NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 5:15 pm

Ronald Heifetz has been a professor of public leadership at Harvard's Kennedy School for three decades, teaching classes that have included aspiring business leaders and budding heads of state. Each year, he says, the students start his course thinking they'll learn the answer to one question:

As leaders, how can they get others to follow them?

Heifetz says that whole approach is wrong.

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Shots - Health News
1:18 am
Mon November 11, 2013

Self-Employed And With Lots Of Questions About Health Care

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 12:36 pm

The health care exchanges may be open, but there's no question they're still kind of a mess.

"The rollout has been excruciatingly awful for way too many people," Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius conceded to the Senate Finance Committee last week.

But mess or not, the law is going forward, people are trying to use it, and they have questions. Here are some of yours, and our answers.

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World
4:11 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Lighting Up The Investigative Path With Polonium-210

Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat boards a helicopter in Ramallah, the West Bank, for the start of his journey to a hospital in France on Oct. 29, 2004. He died 2 weeks later.
Scott Nelson Getty Images

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 4:58 pm

With a Swiss forensics investigation pointing to polonium-210 as a possible cause of Yasser Arafat's death, the radioactive element is back in the news.

Confirming whether the Palestinian leader died from an assassination attempt will be difficult, given polonium's short half-life and the fact that Arafat has been dead nine years, science writer Deborah Blum says.

Whatever happened to Arafat, polonium does have a deadly history.

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

Merchant Marines See New Obstacles In Food Aid Proposal

The Port of Los Angeles is the busiest port in North American, and it's where many merchant mariners bid for jobs. But a proposed change to the U.S. food aid program could mean shipping out less food to developing countries, and fewer jobs.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 7:54 am

When it comes to shipping in the United States, there's a bit of a paradox. Even as U.S. exports have grown, the U.S. share of shipping has declined dramatically.

The traffic in and out of U.S. ports increases every year, but most of those ships fly foreign flags. In fact, the number of U.S. flagged ships is barely one quarter of what it was in the 1950s. That means fewer and fewer jobs for the men and women who work on those ships: the United States Merchant Marine.

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Author Interviews
2:53 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

How Cynthia Rylant Discovered The Poetry Of Storytelling

Courtesy of Beach Lane Books

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 4:58 pm

Cynthia Rylant is a renowned author who has written for all age groups and been honored with both Caldecott and Newbery prizes for her work.

Her latest book, God Got a Dog, is a collection of poems that only took her one day to write.

"One poem ... just came out of the blue, and I sat down and I wrote it. And then after I finished writing it, I got an idea for another God poem, and so I wrote that one. And so it started in the morning and then by the end of the day, I was finished writing the book," she tells All Things Considered host Arun Rath.

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Author Interviews
2:53 pm
Sun November 10, 2013

A Panorama Of Devastation: Drawing Of WWI Battle Spans 24 Feet

Detail from Plate 11 of Joe Sacco's The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. On July 1st, at precisely 7:30 a.m., the attack commences.
Joe Sacco Courtesy of W. W. Norton & Company

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 4:58 pm

Joe Sacco is a cartoonist, graphic novelist and journalist; he's best-known for his dispatches from today's regions of conflict, like the Middle East and Bosnia, in cartoon form. But for his latest book, The Great War, Sacco turns his eye on history. He's recreated of one of the worst battles of World War I, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, from its hopeful beginning to its brutal end.

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