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3:18 am
Sun February 23, 2014

As The Economy Struggles, Venezuelans Hit The Streets

Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro raises his fist after the National Assembly gave him wide-ranging powers to rule by decree for one year on Nov. 19, 2013. With the economy struggling, demonstrators have taken to the streets the streets.
Juan Barreto AFP/Getty Images

Leopoldo López is a rock star to Venezuelans living in the United States. But in west Caracas he's the rich guy. And those contrasting images could affect the outcome of street protests playing out in Venezuela right now.

But first the obvious: This week's arrest of López, a top Venezuela opposition leader, is a reminder that President Nicolás Maduro's credibility is plummeting during the anti-government demonstrations that have swept his country since Feb. 12.

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Middle East
11:01 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Taliban Suspends Talks On Prisoner Exchange

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 11:45 pm

The Taliban has suspended talks over a possible exchange of Taliban and U.S. prisoners due to the "complexity" of the situation in Afghanistan, the militant group said on Sunday.

"Due to the political complexity of the current situation in the country, the leadership of the Islamic Emirate has decided to suspend the issue for some time," Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid said in an email to media organizations, using the name the Taliban gave their 1996-2001 government.

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Around the Nation
10:40 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

One Dead, 28 Sickened By Carbon Monoxide At New York Mall

Originally published on Sun February 23, 2014 1:21 am

A 55-year-old restaurant manager died and more than two dozen others were taken to hospitals Saturday after being overcome by carbon monoxide at a New York mall, police said.

Suffolk County police identified the man who died as Steven Nelson, a manager at the Legal Sea Foods restaurant at the Walt Whitman Shops in Huntington Station on Long Island.

Police said 28 others affected by carbon monoxide were taken to area hospitals.

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Music Interviews
3:41 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Fred Armisen's Fake Bands (And Their Real Songs)

Bryan Cranston and Fred Armisen in character as The Bjelland Brothers, a sibling soft rock duo dreamed up by Armisen for a 2010 sketch on Saturday Night Live.
NBC via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 12:57 pm

A lot of obscure bands want to reach a national audience, and they send their records to NPR. Unfortunately, there's a lot of forgettable stuff in the mix, and recently the staff of All Things Considered received the kind of CD it would usually toss.

It's got a pair of singles by two bands — The Blue Jean Committee, which came out of the 1970s Massachusetts folk scene; and The Fingerlings, a British post-disco/synth band of art-school graduates. Both sound desperately tiresome.

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Author Interviews
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Forecasting The 'Future' By Tapping Into Human Consciousness

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

Now more than ever before, we have the tools to study the mysteries of consciousness. Memory, dreams, the self are now being examined using high-tech brain scans developed by physicists on the cutting edge of their field.

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The New And The Next
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Making The Coffee Shop Your Office, Without The Guilt

iStockphoto

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

The online magazine Ozy covers people, places and trends on the horizon. Co-founder Carlos Watson joins All Things Considered regularly to tell us about the site's latest feature stories.

This week, Watson talks with host Arun Rath about pay-as-you-go coffee shops popping up around the world that offer a place to work "without any kind of moral shame" or pressure to spend money on coffee and snacks.

They also discuss how the rise of the bioscience sector in Cleveland is revitalizing the city's economy.

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Latin America
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Notorious Mexican Drug Trafficker Arrested

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

Mexican officials have captured that country's number one drug trafficker, Joaquin Guzman, also known as El Chapo. The announcement was made this afternoon by Mexico's attorney general who says the head of the feared Sinaloa Cartel was arrested by special marine forces without a single shot being fired.

We're joined now by NPR's Carrie Kahn in Mexico City. Carrie, they've been looking for Guzman for 13 years. How did they capture him?

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Middle East
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

U.N. Calls On Syria To Allow Access To Humanitarian Aid

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

The U.N. Security Council adopted a resolution Saturday to boost humanitarian aid access in Syria. More than 9 million people need food, water and medicine, according to the U.N.

World
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukraine's Embattled Leadership: A Look At Its Roots

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

To better understand the protests in Kiev, NPR's Arun Rath explores the background of beleaguered Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych with Taras Kuzio, a longtime Ukraine researcher and political observer.

World
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukrainian Opposition Leader Freed Amid Turmoil

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi-Nelson is in Kiev. Hello.

SORAYA SARHADDI-NELSON, BYLINE: Hi. How are you?

RATH: I'm doing OK. Events there seem to be moving pretty rapidly today. Can you tell us how the president left power and what followed in parliament?

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World
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukraine Parliament Votes President Out Of Power

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

(SOUNDBITE OF GUNSHOTS)

RATH: The images from Kiev this week look like scenes from a revolution - riots, giant statues of former leaders being toppled, crowds chanting for the removal of President Viktor Yanukovych. Scores were killed, and hundreds injured as the capital city seemed to spiral out of control.

(SOUNDBITE OF SHOUTING)

RATH: Then on Friday, news that a peace deal had been reached.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Explosion On Ky. Natural Gas Pipeline Under Investigation

Burned-out vehicles sit among the ruins following a natural gas pipeline explosion in Kentucky on Thursday.
Timothy D. Easley AP

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

A huge boom awoke the people of rural Adair County, Ky., at about 1 a.m. on Feb. 13. Calls flooded 911 dispatchers with reports of a large fire.

The flames were from an explosion on a natural gas pipeline. It left a crater 60 feet deep, destroyed two homes and sent two people to the hospital.

Federal investigators are examining the cause of the blast, but it wasn't the first time the pipeline had failed in some way.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Closing America's Largest Landfill, Without Taking Out The Trash

Trucks dump trash at the Puente Hill Landfill in Puente Hills, Calif., on October 31, 2013. The nation's largest landfill is now covered with soil and closed, and will one day be a park.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

The covering of America's largest landfill — east of downtown Los Angeles — is underway.

The Puente Hills landfill took in trash from all over LA County, becoming the go-to repository for most of Los Angeles' garbage. Over its more than 50 years in operation, the landfill grew higher than 500 feet.

It stopped receiving new trash in October, but the old waste will actually stay. All those years' worth of garbage will be covered up and remain underneath the ground.

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Around the Nation
2:35 pm
Sat February 22, 2014

Where Are The Heroes To Save Pittsburgh's African-American Center?

The $42-million August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh is for sale because it can't pay its bills. Some are questioning why the Center was allowed to fail.
Keith Srakocic AP

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 5:18 pm

In 2009 a gleaming performing arts space opened to great fanfare in downtown Pittsburgh. The distinctive $42 million-dollar building is as long as the block it occupies, and the corner of the building looks like the sail of a ship made in glass and stone.

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The Edge
11:04 am
Sat February 22, 2014

U.S. Men's Hockey Team Loses Bronze To Finland

Finland's Teemu Selanne celebrates after scoring his team's fourth goal during the men's ice hockey bronze-medal game U.S. vs. Finland at the Bolshoy Ice Dome during the Sochi Winter Olympics on Saturday.
Alexander Nemenov AFP/Getty Images

A 43-year-old, six-time Olympian helped lead Finland to a bronze-medal win over the U.S. men's hockey team on Saturday.

Teemu Selanne scored two of Finland's five goals, shutting out the U.S. team 5-0.

Team USA had hoped to overcome Friday's crushing loss to Canada, which, if won, would have made the U.S. a contender for the gold. Despite playing great hockey the entire tournament, things seemed to fall apart against Canada and later, Finland.

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The Two-Way
11:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

In Rare Unison, U.N. Demands That Syria Allow Humanitarian Aid

A Syrian refugee boy stands outside his tent at Al Zaatri refugee camp in the Jordanian city of Mafraq, near the border with Syria, earlier this week.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 2:17 pm

The United Nations Security Council has unanimously called on Syria to immediately allow the delivery of humanitarian aid to millions of needy people in the war-torn country.

Veto-wielding Russia and China, which have been strong supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad's regime in the past, joined other members on the council in passing the resolution.

The move doesn't threaten sanctions, but it does warn of "further steps" if Syria doesn't comply.

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Fresh Air Weekend
10:32 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: David O. Russell, 'Last Of The Unjust,' And 'Sonic Wonders'

Why does thunder rumble? Acoustic professor Trevor Cox explains that it has to do with the way lightning is a jagged line. "Each little kink is actually generating the sound, and the reason thunder rumbles is because the sound takes different time to come from different kinks because they're all slightly different distances from you," he says.
Mariana Suarez AFP/Getty Images

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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The Two-Way
10:26 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Mexican Drug Cartel Kingpin Captured In Joint U.S.-Mexico Raid

Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman is escorted to a helicopter in handcuffs by Mexican navy marines at a navy hanger in Mexico City on Saturday. A senior U.S. law enforcement official said that Guzman, the head of Mexico's Sinaloa Cartel, was captured alive overnight in the beach resort town of Mazatlan.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 4:04 am

This story was updated at 4:20 p.m. ET.

The head of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel, Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, was captured overnight by U.S. and Mexican officials in the Pacific coastal town of Mazatlan.

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Europe
10:08 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Russia's Cossacks Ride Back From History As 'Patriots'

Cossacks, who formed a feared military force in czarist times, start their 2012 ceremonial march from Moscow to Paris in memory of soldiers killed during the war against Napoleon in 1812.
Alexander Zemlianichenko AP

Originally published on Fri February 28, 2014 3:17 pm

The contrast couldn't have been greater: the protest band Pussy Riot in colorful ski masks and mini dresses, attempting to film a segment for a new video on Sochi's waterfront; and Cossacks in traditional uniform with black sheepskin hats and riding boots, patrolling Sochi streets as part of security for the Olympics.

The Cossacks, trying to enforce a government ban on protests, knocked band member Nadezhda Tolokonnikova to the ground, lashed her with a horse whip, and roughed up other musicians.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:43 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Prediction

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:03 am

Our panelists predict how organizers will spice things up at the next Olympic games.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:43 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:03 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:43 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Limericks

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 10:03 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Pay As You Go, The Yippy Menace, and Dead Sexy.

The Two-Way
9:31 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Tale Of Two Popes: Francis, Benedict Appear Together In Public

Newly-elected Cardinal Leopoldo Jose Brenes Solorzano, Archbishop of Managua, right, is hugged by Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI during a consistory inside the St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, on Saturday.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

Pope Francis and his predecessor, Benedict XVI, appeared together at a ceremony anointing 19 new cardinals in what The Associated Press described as "an unprecedented blending of papacies past, present and future."

In the solemn event, known as a consistory, Francis on Saturday bestowed red hats on his first batch of cardinals.

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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat February 22, 2014

A Life Story In 6 Songs — Part 1

Amy Bailey

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 3:41 pm

Tons of people responded — thoughtfully, wittily, smartly, poignantly — to NPR's recent request: Tell us the six songs of your life.

Sifting through the more than 1,000 annotated playlists, we came up with a few that seem exemplary of the original idea: People telling the stories of their lives — up to this point — through a half-dozen songs.

We were knocked out by the variety of the selections.

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The Edge
8:17 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Getting Technical: Questions And Answers About The Winter Olympics

American Bode Miller inspired a question about terminal velocity, resistance, and friction with his skiing in Sochi. It's one of many technical questions that came up during the Winter Olympics.
Olivier Morin AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 8:41 pm

Events in the Winter Olympics can be highly technical, with arcane rules and specialized equipment that can defy easy explanation. On the question-and-answer site Quora, several interesting topics have come up in recent days, from why athletes use tape on their sleds to how a human can surpass 80 mph on skis.

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The Edge
8:16 am
Sat February 22, 2014

U.S. Olympic Officials: It Wasn't Suits That Hurt Speedskaters

Speedskaters from the U.S., Brian Hansen (from left), Jonathan Kuck and Joey Mantia, compete in the team pursuit speedskating race for seventh place at the Adler Arena Skating Center on Saturday.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 5:55 am

America's performance in the 2014 Winter Games has been solid, if not spectacular. Team USA has managed to stay at or near the top of the medal heap in Sochi for most of the games.

But big names like snowboarder Shaun White, speed skater Shani Davis, skier Bode Miller and both U.S. hockey teams have disappointed when they were expected by many experts to dominate. (With hockey, however, it might have been more hope than actual expectation of gold.)

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Simon Says
7:58 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Ukrainian Olympic Skier's Stand Is A Sacrifice For Her Country

Ukrainian skier Bogdana Matsotska decided not to compete in Friday's slalom race, in a show of solidarity with protesters in Kiev.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 11:06 am

Sports are supposed to be separate from politics, but athletes and games can't always be kept separate from life and death.

Scores of people were killed in Ukraine this week, as the security forces of President Viktor Yanukovich opened fire on anti-government protesters in Kiev's Maidan, now called Independence Square.

While some 800 miles away, more than 40 Ukrainian athletes have been skiing, skating, working hard to win medals at the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia.

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Books News & Features
6:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

'The Natural' Of 1952 Holds Lessons For Today's MLB

Originally published on Sat February 22, 2014 11:06 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There's an old baseball legend about the kid out of nowhere who boards a train for a tryout in Chicago with nothing but his toothbrush and a bat he calls Wonderboy. The kid strikes out the Whammer, the best hitter in the game, but gets to his hotel and opens his door to a pretty girl. Wham, bam, she shoots him in the stomach and he doesn't make a comeback for 15 years.

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Books News & Features
6:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Celebrate Winnie-The-Pooh's 90th With A Rare Recording (And Hunny)

On his first birthday, Christopher Robin Milne — son of A.A. Milne — was given a teddy bear. That bear became the inspiration for the Winnie-the-Pooh tales, the first of which appeared in 1924. Father and son are pictured above in 1926.
Howard Coster Apic/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 1:43 pm

This month, A.A. Milne's beloved bear celebrates a big birthday. Winnie-the-Pooh made his first appearance as "Edward Bear" in a short poem titled "Teddy Bear" which was published in Punch magazine on Feb. 13, 1924.

In honor of Pooh's 90th, we're listening back to a rare, 1929 recording, in which Milne reads from his book, Winnie-the-Pooh.

So find a pot of your favorite "hunny" and click the audio link above to hear Milne's reading.

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Remembrances
6:03 am
Sat February 22, 2014

Writer Mavis Gallant Portrayed 'Lost Souls' Of Post-WWII Europe

More than 100 of Mavis Gallant's short stories were published in The New Yorker.
Louis Monier Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 1:43 pm

Unless you've been a devoted reader of New Yorker short stories for the last 60 years, you may not know the name Mavis Gallant. The magazine published more Gallant stories than almost any other writer, except John Updike.

She died Tuesday in Paris at age 91.

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