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Sports
4:29 am
Fri February 21, 2014

World's Best Slalom Skier Prepares For Olympic Event

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Eighteen-year-old American Mikaela Shiffrin is the favorite in Friday's women's slalom at the Winter Olympics in Sochi. Three other Americans are also in the field of 88.

Middle East
4:10 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Sen. Tim Kaine Looks For Egypt's Steps Toward Democracy

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 9:43 am

Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine of Virginia is on a Middle East tour. From Cairo, Kaine talks to Steve Inskeep about U.S. aid to Egypt and what he's observing as the country sets out on a path to democracy.

NPR Story
4:06 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Ukrainian Opposition Reacts To Reported Deal

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 8:54 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now as Soraya just mentioned, we'll have to wait to see if Ukrainians who are part of this protest movement side with the opposition leaders and agree to this deal. It is worth remembering that Ukraine, in terms of history and language, is really split in two - the eastern Russian-speaking half looks to Russia. The western Ukrainian-speaking region, which is once part of Poland, feels much closer to Europe. And people in the west are more often opposed to President Yanukovych.

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Europe
3:27 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Ukraine: Deal Reached At Crisis Talks

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

The office of president Viktor Yanukovich says a deal has been reached with opposition leaders to stop the violence in the capital Kiev. Scores of people have died in two days of clashes.

NPR Story
3:24 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Are More Eccentric Artists Perceived As Better Artists?

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Think for a moment about an artist who is really out there in some way. Maybe a musician comes to mind, somebody like Lady Gaga or a painter like Salvador Dali. New research now asks whether you like such artists because of their art or because they conform to a mental stereotype of how artists are supposed to behave. NPR's social science correspondent Shankar Vedantam joins us regularly on this program. Hi, Shankar.

SHANKAR VEDANTAM, BYLINE: Good morning, Steve.

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NPR Story
3:24 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Obama To Enlist Democratic Governors' Support

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Thursday at fundraising dinner, President Obama told Democratic governors that their Republican counterparts are making it harder for people to get health insurance or exercise their right to vote.

NPR Story
3:24 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Girl Scouts Frown On Outsourcing Cookie Sales

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

If you're not snacking on pretzels, try some Thin Mints, because it's the middle of Girl Scouts cookie season. And our last word in business today is: cookie outsourcing.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Last year, Girl Scouts around the country sold 200,000 boxes of cookies and raised nearly $800 million. But maybe we should say not the Girl Scouts sold them all. Sometimes the work is outsourced to their parents. And a recent opinion article in the Washington Post, criticized that practice.

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The Record
1:39 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Hearing Devotion In Pop's Details

Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons performs onstage at the Amnesty International Concert presented by the CBGB Festival at Barclays Center on February 5, 2014 in New York City.
Neilson Barnard Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 9:08 am

This week, the rock band Imagine Dragons set a record for the longest run on Billboard's Hot 100 singles chart — 77 weeks, since it debuted in August of 2012.

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StoryCorps
1:38 am
Fri February 21, 2014

The Lives Of Blind Brothers Changed When 'Dad' Came Knocking

The lives of Leo, Nick and Steven Argel (from left) changed the day Ollie Cantos knocked on their door.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Leo, Nick and Steven Argel are 14-year-old triplets, and they've all been blind since birth.

Growing up in Arlington, Va., their single mother had a hard time caring for them.

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The Salt
1:37 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Trader Joe's Caught In Sticky Lawsuit Over Peanut Butter Pretzels

The Trader Joe's Peanut Butter Filled Pretzel: The salty-sweet snack that launched a bitter lawsuit.
Courtesy of Tina Haupert

Originally published on Mon February 24, 2014 12:37 pm

Among the many snacks you can find in the aisles of Trader Joe's is an icon of sweet and salty goodness: the peanut butter pretzel. It's a combination so tasty, famed food writer Ruth Reichl once raved, "You haven't lived until you've tried the two together."

But the beloved treats aren't just treasures for the palate — they're a pretty lucrative business worth millions of dollars. And now, Trader Joe's is being sued for allegedly cornering the market on the snack.

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Shots - Health News
1:35 am
Fri February 21, 2014

As Deadline Nears, State Insurance Exchanges Still A Mixed Bag

Oregon's road to health coverage continues to be bumpy; the website for the state's health insurance marketplace still isn't fully open to consumers.
ilbusca iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 3:53 pm

With a bit more than a month left for people to sign up for health insurance plans set up under the Affordable Care Act, the federal website known as HealthCare.gov finally seems to be working smoothly — in 36 states.

But what's happening in the 14 states that are running their own exchanges?

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Around the Nation
1:35 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Maryland Bill May Require Holocaust Reparations From Rail Company

Holocaust survivor Leo Bretholz's Change.org petition has more than 107,000 signatures.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 7:29 am

Lawmakers in Maryland are considering a bill that would block one of the firms seeking to bid on a multibillion-dollar light rail project from winning its bid unless its majority stockholder agrees to pay reparations to Holocaust victims.

The legislation, co-sponsored by Maryland Delegate Kirill Reznik, would block a consortium including Paris-based rail company Keolis from winning a public-private partnership for the state's Purple Line project, a 35-year contract worth more than $6 billion.

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All Tech Considered
1:33 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Risk Is Low And Business Is Booming In The Malware Market

Stolen credit card data are sold on underground markets, along with the malware and tools the thieves need to steal the data themselves.
Elise Amendola AP

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 12:29 pm

Malware is malicious, bad software. It's the code that cybercriminals use to steal credit card numbers and bank accounts. And the big hack against Target showed how good these criminals are getting: They've built a thriving underground where credit cards go on sale before anyone even knows that a massive breach has happened.

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Planet Money
1:32 am
Fri February 21, 2014

Duke: $60,000 A Year For College Is Actually A Discount

Students attend graduation ceremonies at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Two-thirds of college students now graduate with debt, owing an average amount of $24,000.
Butch Dill AP

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 8:36 am

In 1984, it cost $10,000 a year to go to Duke University. Today, it's $60,000 a year. "It's staggering," says Duke freshman Max Duncan, "especially considering that's for four years."

But according to Jim Roberts, executive vice provost at Duke, that's actually a discount. "We're investing on average about $90,000 in the education of each student," he says. Roberts is not alone in making the claim. In fact, it's one most elite research institutions point to when asked about rising tuition.

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Parallels
10:03 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

The World According To Vladimir Putin

Putin greets his Syrian counterpart, Bashar Assad, in Moscow on Dec. 19, 2006. Russia has remained a steadfast ally of Assad despite three years of civil war and Western calls for Assad's ouster.
Mikhail Klimentyev AP

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 10:29 am

The worldview of Russian President Vladimir Putin could be summed up along these lines:

Moscow's precipitous decline in global influence since the Soviet breakup must be reversed. Russia must be respected as the dominant power in former Soviet republics like Ukraine. Russia is entitled to a strong voice in the Middle East based on longstanding ties to Syria and other Arab states. In the rest of the world, Russia will be a counterweight to the U.S. and the West, which meddles in far too many places.

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Code Switch
6:07 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

For Abused Native American Women, New Law Provides A 'Ray Of Hope'

Deborah Parker, vice chair of the Tulalip Tribes of Washington state, reacts to President Barack Obama signing the Violence Against Women Act in 2013 in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

This Thursday, three Native American tribes are changing how they administer justice.

For almost four decades, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling has barred tribes from prosecuting non-American Indian defendants. But as part of last year's re-authorization of the Violence Against Women Act, a new program now allows tribes to try some non-Indian defendants in domestic abuse cases.

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Sports
6:02 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Hometown Hero Triumphs In Women's Figure Skating

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

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The Two-Way
5:19 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

USDA Tells Schools: Don't Refuse Food To Students Who Owe

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 1:29 pm

U.S. school systems should not take cafeteria lunches away from students whose parents have not paid their accounts, says the Department of Agriculture.

The agency is responding to a January incident in which a Utah elementary school served students food but threw it away when their accounts were found to have a negative balance.

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It's All Politics
5:14 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Obama Buoys Democrats By Dropping Social Security Cut Idea

President Obama very likely made Democrats' midterm campaign messaging easier by dropping from his new budget a proposal that would have reduced the size of Social Security checks.
Matt Rourke AP

For a political party already facing a difficult midterm election the way the Democrats are, the fewer internally divisive issues the better.

And few items were more divisive among Democrats than President Obama's previous proposal to reduce Social Security entitlement spending by using a less generous formula to calculate cost-of-living increases, so long as Republicans agreed to raise revenue by ending or reducing loopholes that would raise revenue.

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The Two-Way
5:13 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Author Of Snowden Book: 'Secret Reader' Deleted Paragraphs

Luke Harding, the Guardian's Moscow-based correspondent.
Ivan Sekretarev AP

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 4:07 am

In the British newspaper The Guardian, today, there is a curiosity we can't help but note.

Correspondent Luke Harding makes an allegation that belongs in a spy novel. Harding writes that as he wrote The Snowden Files: The Inside Story of the World's Most Wanted Man strange things happened.

We'll let you read the whole piece, but we'll leave you with two key paragraphs:

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Movie Reviews
4:58 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

One Conflict, One Wall, Two Sides Of The Arab-Israeli World

Omar (Adam Bakri) is a Palestinian baker and secret informant who braves the wall that splits his community to visit his lover, Nadia (Leem Lubany) in the Oscar-nominated film Omar.
Adopt Films

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 3:27 pm

American art-house audiences are being offered an intriguing exercise in double vision over the next couple of weeks: two movies about Palestinian informants and their complicated relationships with Israel's secret service, one directed by a Palestinian, the other by an Israeli. Their similarities turn out to be nearly as intriguing as their differences.

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Environment
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Keystone Greens See Pipeline As Crucial Test For Obama

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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All Tech Considered
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Video Streaming Is Straining, But Who Will Ease The Tension?

Internet service providers are having trouble keeping pace with growing demand for video streaming services. But there's disagreement over how to fix the problem.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 12:16 pm

Suzie Felber's kids are only just learning what a commercial is.

"They start screaming when they come on," she says. "They think the TV's broken."

The Felbers usually stream television shows over the Internet in their New Jersey home.

More and more people are following suit, using services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime. But these programs take up a huge amount of digital bandwidth, and that's led to a dispute between these services and the Internet service providers that carry them.

Slower Service

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Business
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

What's Up With Facebook's Big Acquisition?

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Yesterday, Facebook bought a little startup for a lot of money, $19 billion in cash and stock. It's hard to fathom a price tag that big. Half the companies in the S&P 500 aren't worth that much. But a look at who exactly is using the application called WhatsApp may explain the value that Facebook sees in it. Here's more from Aarti Shahani of member station KQED in San Francisco.

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Europe
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Kiev Protester Talks Aims And Issues Of Ukrainian Opposition

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Earlier today, we spoke with another protester at Independence Square, known locally as Maidan Square. Viktor Andrusiv has been part of the protest movement from the day it started last November. We reached Andrusiv just hours after he says one of his friends was killed by police. I asked him what happened.

VIKTOR ANDRUSIV: Actually, we still are trying to find out. But he was attacking the police and he has a lot of wounds from a gun.

SIEGEL: A lot of bullet wounds?

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Europe
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

At Least 70 Killed In Kiev, With Casualties Still Mounting

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

In Ukraine, protesters and police clash today in the worst violence yet during the three-month old uprising against President Viktor Yanukovych. A flurry of diplomatic visits to Kiev and the EU's threat of sanctions have failed to slow the carnage. At least 100 people are reported dead after two days of fighting. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is in Kiev covering the crisis.

(SOUNDBITE OF BELLS RINGING)

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Around the Nation
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

Kiev Protesters Find Backup In Philly

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Russia's president is also being criticized by Ukrainian-Americans watching the violent confrontations going on in their home country. Ukrainians in the U.S. tend to side with those protesting in Kiev's independent square. They're angry that President Viktor Yanukovych chose a closer relationship with Russia over a deal with the EU.

The Philadelphia area is home to more than 55,000 people of Ukrainian ancestry. NPR's Jeff Brady reports the community is holding rallies and lobbying their members of Congress.

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Europe
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

The Portrait Of A People In Putin's Russia

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The Winter Games in Sochi have focused world attention on Russia in the age of Putin: huge state expenditures, contracts that benefit the president's cronies, complaints about shoddy workmanship, controversy over Russia's treatment of gays and lesbians.

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Middle East
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

With Egyptian Press On Trial, Space For Dissent Is In Question

Originally published on Fri February 21, 2014 3:52 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Now, to Cairo where the spotlight is on an important case in the government's crackdown on press freedoms. Three jailed journalists for the al-Jazeera English channel were taken to their first court hearing today. Their arrest nearly two months ago has been denounced by rights groups. As NPR's Leila Fadel reports, they were denied bail today in a short but dramatic appearance.

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Middle East
4:46 pm
Thu February 20, 2014

In Syria, Neighboring Militant Group Shifts Weight To Step In

Originally published on Thu February 20, 2014 6:02 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We begin this hour with Syria. Peace talks have stalled and with no clear path forward, all sides are, once again, digging in. A look at Lebanon's Hezbollah reveals how the region is primed for war. Its fighters are giving pivotal help to the Syrian regime. NPR's Alice Fordham is in Lebanon and reports on why a group founded on resisting Israeli occupation has embraced the war next door.

(SOUNDBITE OF EXPLOSION)

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