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3:31 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

At Tacloban Airport, Aid Workers Arrive As Residents Try To Leave

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

The town of Tacloban on the island of Leyte in the Philippines was devastated by Typhoon Haiyan. The scene at the airport there was chaotic as the Philippine and U.S. military delivered food and aid workers and residents rushed to board planes headed back to less-damaged Manila .

Shots - Health News
3:31 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

So, You Have Gonorrhea. Who Tells Your Ex?

Illustration by Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:48 pm

In an effort to stop a spate of gonorrhea outbreaks, at least one public health department in the Pacific Northwest is offering a helpful service to infected patients: anonymous notification of former sexual partners.

That's right. A government worker will track down and contact each ex for you. Awkward for all concerned? Yes. But at a time when gonorrhea is becoming stubbornly drug-resistant, health officials see it as time — and embarrassment — well spent.

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The Salt
3:16 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Chef Chat: We Pick The Brains Of Ottolenghi And Tamimi

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi grab a quick breakfast with NPR's Madhulika Sikka. They stopped by NPR in October to talk food philosophy.
Morgan Walker/ NPR

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi own four wildly popular London restaurants and have authored runaway best-selling cookbooks for omnivores and vegetarians alike.

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Business
3:16 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Airline Antitrust Deal Seen Boosting Competition At Airports

An American Airlines jet passes the Washington Monument as it lands at Ronald Reagan National Airport. That's one of seven airports where American and US Airways must now make room for low-cost competitors under a settlement with the Justice Department.
Mark Lennihan AP

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 2:21 pm

From the start, airline analysts had been predicting that an antitrust lawsuit would not stop the $11 billion deal to combine US Airways and American Airlines.

They saw the suit, filed in August, as a government negotiating tactic, not a deal-breaker.

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The Two-Way
3:02 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Administration Invites HealthCare.gov Users To Try Again

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange internet site October 1, 2013.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 6:11 pm

If at first you don't succeed, try again.

That's the message from the White House on Tuesday, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) asking more than 275,000 people who tried and failed to sign up for health plans on the stalled HealthCare.gov website to give it another shot.

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The Two-Way
2:51 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

World Anti-Doping Leader: Armstrong Needs 'Miracle' To Return

The head of the World Anti-Doping Agency calls Lance Armstrong's lifetime ban "done and dusted." Armstrong is seen here riding in an event in Iowa this year.
Matthew Stockman Getty Images

Sports officials from cycling's governing body and the World Anti-Doping Agency will meet this week to discuss an in-depth review of doping among cyclists. But WADA's chief says that one topic that's not likely to be reviewed is Lance Armstrong's lifetime ban, which he calls "done and dusted."

WADA president John Fahey made that comment Tuesday in South Africa, where officials are meeting for the World Conference on Doping in Sport.

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Parallels
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Ukraine, A Chocolate Factory And The Fate Of A Woman

Individually wrapped chocolate-covered hazelnut sweets move along a conveyor belt on the production line at the Roshen Confectionary Corp. factory in Kiev, Ukraine. A Russian ban on Ukraine's chocolate comes at a time when the nation is considering aligning itself with the European Union.
Joseph Sywenkyj Bloomberg via Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:41 pm

It's been more than two decades since the former Soviet Union broke apart, and to the dismay of Russia, many of the 15 former Soviet republics have spun away from Moscow's orbit.

Now Ukraine — with 46 million people — has a chance to say goodbye to its Soviet past and align itself both economically and culturally with the European Union.

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Shots - Health News
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Medicaid Questions Slow Insurance Purchases On Colorado Exchange

Click right this way for Medicaid.
Connect for Health

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:39 pm

If you want to meet somebody who's really happy with the Affordable Care Act, then say hello to Sue Birch, Colorado's Medicaid director.

Nearly 40,000 Coloradans signed up for health coverage on the state's new marketplace, Connect for Health Colorado, rather than HealthCare.gov.

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Deceptive Cadence
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Remembering 'Holy Minimalist' Composer John Tavener

John Tavener's ethereal music was influenced by the Russian Orthodox traditions.
Simone Canetty-Clarke Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 5:47 pm

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NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Indie Band Yellow Dogs Members Die In Murder Suicide

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

Two members of the up-and-coming indie band The Yellow Dogs were among the dead in a Monday morning murder-suicide in Brooklyn. It's a tragic ending for a band that came from Iran to escape crackdowns on rock music.

NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Kerry's New Mission: Convince Congress To Take Iran Deal

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

Secretary of State John Kerry is back in Washington to defend the proposed nuclear deal with Iran to skeptical members of Congress. He and his colleagues from other major powers failed to reach a deal with Iran during talks over the weekend in Geneva. Iran blames France's hard line for blowing up the deal, though Kerry has tried to downplay that.

NPR Story
2:46 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Obama Taps Treasury's Bailout Lawyer To Lead Derivatives Watchdog

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

Timothy Massad is nominated to head the Commodities Futures Trading Commission. He would replace Gary Gensler, whose four-year tenure was marred by questions of his professional ties to Jon Corzine and the downfall of MF Global.

It's All Politics
2:31 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Close, Closer, Closest: A Guide To Election Photo Finishes

Democrat Al Franken, with his wife, Frannie, meets reporters and a small gathering of supporters at their house in Minneapolis on June 30, 2009, after the Minnesota Supreme Court ruled in favor of the Democrat in the Senate race against Republican Norm Coleman.
Andy King AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:36 pm

The Virginia attorney general's race, which cut a relatively low profile heading into Election Day, now has a chance to end up as part of history.

With more than 2.2 million ballots cast and Democratic state Sen. Mark Herring leading Republican state Sen. Mark Obenshain by a mere 117 votes, the election is shaping up as one of the closest statewide contests in decades.

With a recount looming, the winner isn't expected to be officially declared until December. But in the meantime, here's a look back at some of the closest statewide elections of the past five decades:

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The Two-Way
1:55 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Nigerian Pirates Free Kidnapped U.S. Mariners

Fighters with the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), pictured in 2008. The rebel group claimed responsibility for the kidnapping.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Two U.S. crewmembers seized last month from a ship off the coast of Nigeria have been released by their pirate captors, the State Department said Tuesday.

The captain and engineer from the U.S.-flagged C-Retriever, a 222-foot offshore resupply, were abducted on Oct. 23 when gunman boarded the vessel.

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Shots - Health News
1:47 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Clinton To Obama: Honor Promise That People Can Keep Coverage

Bill Clinton says President Obama should figure out a way to honor his promise that people who like their insurance can keep it.
OZY via Facebook

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:38 pm

If you haven't heard about it yet, President Clinton sounds off on all things Obamacare during a provocative video interview with OZY, an online magazine.

Right off the bat, Clinton affirms his support for the law, despite its problems. "The big lesson is that we're better off with this law than without it," he says.

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All Tech Considered
1:44 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

For A Few Hundred Bucks, You Can Make Your Own 3-D Printer

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 7:20 am

You can print out almost anything with a 3-D printer, from weapons and prosthetic hands to Yoda figurines and

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The Two-Way
1:43 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Larry Flynt Seeks To Block Execution Of Man Who Shot Him

Hustler magazine magnate Larry Flynt, pictured during a 2007 news conference in his office in Beverly Hills, Calif.
Kevork Djansezian AP

Larry Flynt doesn't want the man who shot him to die.

The pornography publisher was shot and paralyzed in 1978 by Joseph Paul Franklin, a white supremacist who objected to a photo spread of an African American man and a white woman published in Hustler magazine.

Franklin is scheduled to be executed on Nov. 20 for a 1977 murder committed outside a synagogue in a St. Louis suburb.

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The Two-Way
1:35 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

How About A Coke? Warhol Painting Up For Grabs

Coca-Cola (3) was one of many of Warhol's pop art pieces, which celebrated popular culture and consumerism in post-World War II America.
Courtesy of Christie's

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:59 pm

On Tuesday, artist Andy Warhol's oversized and iconic Coca-Cola (3) will hit the auction block at Christie's, and to borrow an old slogan from the company, It's The Real Thing.

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All Songs Considered
1:27 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

New Mix: John Vanderslice, Hospitality, Marijuana Deathsquads, More

Clockwise from upper left: Ephel Duath, Hospitality, Toy, John Vanderslice
Courtesy of the artists

On this episode of All Songs Considered, hosts Bob Boilen and Robin Hilton are still buzzing from the concerts they saw last week, from the spastic noise rock of Marijuana Deathsquads (webcast live from the 9:30 Club), to an intimate, joyful and humor-filled set by John Vanderslice.

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Heavy Rotation
1:06 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Heavy Rotation: Download 10 Songs Public Radio Can't Stop Playing

Holy Ghost! is getting a lot of play on AllDayPlay.fm.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed November 13, 2013 3:11 am

Heavy Rotation is a monthly sampler of public radio hosts' favorite songs. Check out past editions here.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

China's Leaders Unveil Economic Reforms

Plainclothes policemen guard in front of Tiananmen Gate outside the Great Hall of the People where the Communist Party's 205-member Central Committee gathered for its third annual plenum on Tuesday.
Feng Li Getty Images

China's leaders have laid out a plan to wrest a bigger chunk of the country's economy from state control and turn it over to the free market in hopes of stimulating growth and curb corruption.

At the end of the four-day Third Plenum meeting, Communist Party leaders said that state ownership would continue to play a key role in the economy, but endorsed more private ownership.

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The Two-Way
12:33 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

One Of Fed's First Quantitative Easers: 'I'm Sorry, America'

Andrew Huszar.
Rutgers

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:32 pm

One of the men who oversaw the Federal Reserve's first round of quantitative easing is making a remarkable statement with an op-ed in The Wall Street Journal today.

"I'm sorry, America," Andrew Huszar writes.

Huszar, who was initially hired by the Fed to oversee the purchase of $1.25 trillion worth of mortgage bonds in a year, goes on to describe the program as the "greatest backdoor Wall Street bailout of all time."

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Parallels
12:22 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Do For-Profit Schools Give Poor Kenyans A Real Choice?

Young students in a Bridge International Academy school in Nairobi, in September. On the surface, there's little to distinguish these schools from others in the developing world. But Bridge's model relies on teachers reading lessons from tablets.
Frederic Courbet for NPR

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:21 pm

Bridge International Academies has set up more than 200 schools in Kenya over the past four years, and plans to open 50 more in January.

Using a school-in-a-box model, Bridge's founders say it gives primary schoolkids a quality education for roughly $5 a month.

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The Two-Way
12:04 pm
Tue November 12, 2013

Women Fare Worse In Egypt Than In Any Arab State: Survey

A new survey of gender experts finds that in the Arab world, Egyptian women face the worst treatment. Here, women attend a political march to the presidential palace in Cairo in February.
Khaled Desouki AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:35 pm

Citing high rates of sexual harassment and female genital mutilation, a new survey finds that women in Egypt face the worst treatment in any Arab country. Other countries with high levels of unrest — Iraq and Syria — are also among the worst for women, along with Saudi Arabia, according to the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

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Parallels
11:47 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Can The Philippines Save Itself From Typhoons?

The sun sets behind a house damaged by Typhoon Haiyan outside the hard-hit city of Tacloban. The Philippines has gotten better at preparing for typhoons, but remains extremely vulnerable.
Philippe Lopez AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 12:05 pm

For the third year in a row, the Philippines has been hit by a major storm claiming more than 1,000 lives, and the death toll from Haiyan, one of the worst on record, could climb to 10,000.

With thousands of islands in the warm waters of the Pacific, the Philippines is destined to face the wrath of angry tropical storms year after year.

So what can a poor, densely populated country do to mitigate the huge loss of life and the massive destruction?

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Tue November 12, 2013

After Typhoon Tore Through, People 'Were Left On Their Own'

In Guiuan, the Philippines, the typhoon left behind destruction and left people fending for themselves in the first days after.
John Alvin Villafranca Courtesy of David Santos and the photographer

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 3:56 pm

  • David Santos on saying prayers as the typhoon raged.
  • David Santos on realizing how widespread the destruction was.

The concrete floors and walls shook, the door of the room almost blew off its hinges and he "said a lot prayers," Filipino TV reporter David Santos says as he remembers what it was like to ride out Typhoon Haiyan inside a small hospital in the Philippines town of Guiuan.

Then, when he and other survivors emerged on Friday, the scene was incredible.

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Commentary
11:11 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Was Rand Paul's Plagiarism Dishonest Or A Breach Of Good Form?

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., talks to reporters at the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 3.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:31 pm

Even taken together, the charges didn't seem to amount to that big a deal — just a matter of quoting a few factual statements and a Wikipedia passage without attributing them. But as Rand Paul discovered, the word "plagiarism" can still rouse people to steaming indignation. Samuel Johnson called plagiarism the most reproachful of literary crimes, and the word itself began as the name of a real crime. In Roman law, a plagiarius was someone who abducted a child or a slave — it's from "plaga," the Latin word for a net or a snare.

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Author Interviews
11:11 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Even When It Hurts 'ALOT,' Brosh Faces Life With Plenty Of 'Hyperbole'

This Is Why I'll Never Be An Adult" blog post. (It's now a popular Internet meme.)" href="/post/even-when-it-hurts-alot-brosh-faces-life-plenty-hyperbole" class="noexit lightbox">
You may recognize this drawing from Allie Brosh's popular "This Is Why I'll Never Be An Adult" blog post. (It's now a popular Internet meme.)
Courtesy Touchstone Books

Originally published on Mon December 9, 2013 2:21 pm

Allie Brosh's humorous, autobiographical blog, Hyperbole and a Half, has a huge following. In 2011, an editor of PC World included it in a list of the funniest sites on the Internet, and this year, Advertising Age included Brosh in its annual list of the year's most influential and creative thinkers and doers.

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It's All Politics
10:42 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Chris Christie's Surprising Role Model For Minority Outreach

Ronald Reagan walks over rubble in a South Bronx lot in August 1980.
Pickoff AP

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 2:06 pm

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie says he can teach national Republicans an important lesson: If they want to appeal to voters beyond their traditional conservative base, they need to go to where those voters are.

As he made the rounds of Sunday's Washington talk shows, Christie explained his rationale to Fox News' Chris Wallace:

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The Two-Way
10:34 am
Tue November 12, 2013

Shooting At Houston-Area House Party Was Gang Fight, Says DA

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 4:28 pm

Here's a quick update to a story we told you about over the weekend: Authorities are shedding a bit more light on a Houston-area incident that left two dead and 22 injured after gunmen opened fire during an 18th birthday celebration.

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