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Shots - Health News
3:21 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

As Health Law Takes Hold, Rate Of Uninsured Falls

A survey taken in early 2014 finds that the uninsured rate has declined. But differences by age remain.
Gallup

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:34 pm

Since the Affordable Care Act kicked in fully, the percentage of Americans without health coverage has fallen to its lowest point in five years.

In the last quarter of 2013, just before the federal health law took full effect, 17.1 percent of Americans reported they lacked health insurance, according to a Gallup survey.

When the survey was taken (between Jan. 2 and Feb. 28), the rate had dropped to 1.2 percentage points to 15.9 percent.

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History
3:10 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

QUIZ: What Came Out Of World War I?

World War I was when the old world became the new. Here, a German cavalryman wears a gas mask and carries a long spear or pole, from two different ages of war.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

World War I shook up the world in a dramatic way — and from that chaos emerged inventions, words and other things we still use today.

Can you identify them all?

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

It's All Politics
2:34 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

4 Reasons The Pew Millennials Report Should Worry Democrats, Too

Supporters listen to President Obama during a campaign rally at Jiffy Lube Live in Bristow, Va., on Nov. 3, 2012.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 4:58 pm

The Pew Research Center's newly-released survey on American millennials has so far been interpreted as the latest demographic disaster confronting the GOP.

According to the report, millennials — defined as Americans aged 18 to 32 — appear to vote heavily Democratic and hold liberal views on a variety of contemporary political and social issues.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Prosecutors Say D.C. Mayor Knew About Shadow Campaign

Washington Mayor Vincent Gray.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 6:40 am

A vast and long-running federal investigation has now implicated D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray.

Businessman Jeffrey Thompson pleaded guilty to conspiracy, admitting that he funneled more than $2 million into illegal campaign contributions, including hundreds of thousands of dollars to a shadow campaign to help elect the Democratic mayor.

But the bombshell is that Thompson says Gray knew about the secret and illegal effort to help his cause.

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Technology
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Path To Television's Future May Be Paved In Virtual Reality

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

On display at South by Southwest is an attempt to create the future of storytelling. HBO is working with Oculus — maker of virtual reality goggles — to put the audience right into Game of Thrones.

Book Reviews
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Review: 'E.E. Cummings: A Life'

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Spring 1958, the poet Edward Estlin Cummings, or E.E. Cummings as most of us know him, was a passenger in writer John Cheever's car. Cummings had just spoken at the school of Cheever's teenage daughter and she was sitting in the back seat. Well, that day kicked off a fascination that led to Susan Cheever's recent biography "E.E. Cummings: A Life." Alan Cheuse reviews the book and shares the origins of his own fascination with Cummings.

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Politics
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Hedge Fund Turns To Lobbying To Back Up Its Billion-Dollar Bet

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Short selling a stock - betting that it will go down instead of up - is common on Wall Street. But what about placing a bet against a company and then trying to get the government to do things that would drive down the company's share price?

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Children's Health
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Casinos, Sites Of Excess, Might Actually Help Families Slim Down

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

When you think about casinos, you probably think about excess: smoke-filled rooms, too much alcohol, and endless buffets filled with piles of high-fat and high sugar foods.

But as NPR's Patti Neighmond reports, a new study suggests casinos may actually have a health benefit for children who live in nearby communities.

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Your Money
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Groups Use Cash Prizes To Encourage Saving

Maya Gaines, of the Baltimore CASH Campaign, tries to encourage people to put aside some of their tax refunds into savings. She rings bells, cheers and dances every time someone decides to do that.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 12:16 pm

When it comes to getting ahead in the world, a lack of savings can be a big hurdle, especially for low-income families. Most don't have enough money set aside for emergencies, let alone for college or a house. Some people think the answer is to make savings more fun, like the lottery, with the chance to win big prizes.

It's called prize-linked savings, something that's been available in Great Britain for decades. Now, it's starting to catch on in the United States.

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Latin America
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Drug Cartel Boss Dies A Second Time

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 7:34 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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Europe
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Pending Russian Response, Kerry's Travel Plans Are Up In The Air

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

And we begin this hour with the latest on the standoff over Ukraine. Today, Russian forces seized the Ukrainian naval post, military hospital and a missile unit in Crimea. At the same time, Moscow accused Kiev of encouraging right-wing groups and creating lawlessness in eastern Ukraine. This all complicates things on the diplomatic front.

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Space
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Earthbound Tensions Don't Reach Russian-American Space Partnership

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:20 pm

U.S. astronaut Mike Hopkins is expected to land in Kazakhstan, and despite diplomatic tensions the Russians plan to pick him up. It's another sign that U.S. and Russia remain tied at the hip in space.

Europe
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

In Crimea, Public Relations Can Be As Dangerous As Politics

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

Crimea votes this coming Sunday on whether to claim independence from Ukraine. Polls indicate the measure is sure to pass. But pro-Russian politicians are leaving nothing to chance. They've imposed a near total blackout on information from the government in Kiev.

And as NPR's Gregory Warner reports, volunteers are taking great risks to get that information into Crimea.

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Asia
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

The Challenges Of Recovering An Airliner Out Of Thin Air

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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News
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Broadening Search for Malaysian Airliner Still Yields Only Theories

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel and we begin the hour with the mystery that has confounded the world for three days. What happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370? The plane disappeared Friday on its way from Malaysia to Beijing with 239 people aboard. Today, the search widened. Aircraft and ships from Malaysia, Vietnam, China and the United States are searching the South China Sea for any sign.

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Around the Nation
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Social Distrust Blooms Among Millennials, But Where Are Its Roots?

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

A Pew Study finds that the milliennial generation has a low level of social trust. There are several possible causes for this distrust, including a skewed social media culture and a faltering economy.

Sports
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

After A Marathon Game, Two Hockey Teams Split One Trophy

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 5:59 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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News
2:22 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Keep Austin Wary: Snowden Streams Warnings To Tech Conference

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 7:33 am

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden addressed a large American audience today. He spoke through a video link from Russia where he was given temporary asylum after he leaked thousands of classified NSA documents. The crowd was a friendly one at the South by Southwest Interactive Conference in Austin, Texas. Snowden took some questions and he said technology companies can do more to prevent sweeping surveillance by the U.S. government.

As NPR's Steve Henn reports, the event was moderated by Snowden's attorney.

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The Salt
2:02 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Freshly Baked Art: Cookies That Are A Feast For The Eyes

Rebecca Weld (aka The Cookie Architect) nabbed the Oscar of the cookie world for this series of Nantucket-themed biscuits.
Courtesy of Rebecca Weld via Cookie Connection

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 11:52 am

Rebecca Weld of Potsdam, N.Y., makes her living as an architect. But during her free time, she's hunched over the kitchen counter, like an alchemist, dripping food coloring drop by drop into icing to achieve the perfect color.

"I use rich colors for that dated, antique feel," Weld says.

Antique? Perhaps. But certainly not old school. Weld's cookie designs are astonishingly intricate — including a scene from an Adirondacks lake that looks like you could dive right into it.

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Shots - Health News
1:48 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Memories Can Go Astray When We Step Outside Our Bodies

The illusion of an out-of-body experience made it harder for people to remember what happened.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 12:19 pm

Our bodies may help us remember our lives, fixing experiences in place. By using virtual reality, scientists can make people feel like they're outside their own bodies. And when they do, the brain struggles to remember what happened.

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All Songs Considered
1:04 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Question Of The Week, SXSW Edition: What's Your Fake Band Name?

 

Every year Bob Boilen, NPR Music's Stephen Thompson and I prepare for South by Southwest by listening to songs from roughly 1,500 artists. And when you go through that many bands you start to see trends in the names. The two most commonly occurring words are always — always — "black" and "DJ." In addition to those two, this year we noticed that "white" appears an awful lot, too, as does the name John. Michael, Paul and Jesse are also pretty popular. Go figure.

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The Salt
12:01 pm
Mon March 10, 2014

Sandwich Monday: The Dunkin' Donuts Eggs Benedict Breakfast Sandwich

Portable Eggs Benedict is a real blow to the already-suffering fork industry.
NPR

Originally published on Wed March 12, 2014 11:08 am

Making foods portable has long been a focus of food engineers. Gogurt did it for Yogurt, the McLeash made it easier to drag all your favorite McDonald's foods along with you. And now, by turning the open-faced sandwich closed and upping the viscosity of its Hollandaise, Dunkin' Donuts has brought portability to Eggs Benedict.

Miles: The full name is Eggs Benedict Arnold, because this sandwich is a traitor to everything breakfast should stand for.

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Parallels
11:58 am
Mon March 10, 2014

What If Ukraine Still Had Nuclear Weapons?

President Bill Clinton (from left), Russian President Boris Yeltsin and Ukrainian President Leonid Kravchuk, clasp hands after signing documents whereby the U.S. and Russia agreed to stop aiming long range nuclear missiles at each other, and the Ukraine agreed to dismantle all of its 1,800 nuclear warheads. The event took place on Jan. 14, 1994, at the Kremlin in Moscow.
Diana Walker Time

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:38 pm

Ukraine appears rather helpless in the face of the Russian intervention in Crimea. But what if Ukraine still had nuclear weapons? The confrontation might look rather different, and perhaps much scarier.

When Ukraine gained independence in the 1991 breakup of the Soviet Union, it inherited a nuclear arsenal that included some 1,800 warheads, making it the third largest in the world, trailing only Russia and the U.S.

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Deceptive Cadence
11:55 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Gerard Mortier, A Polarizing Impresario Who Transformed Opera

Belgian opera impresario Gerard Mortier in Germany in 2003. He died Saturday at age 70.
Volker Hartmann AFP/Getty Images

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The Two-Way
11:46 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Smithsonian Institution Gets A New Director

Cornell University President David Skorton speaks during a news conference Monday in Washington, D.C.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 1:36 pm

The new head of the Smithsonian Institution was announced Monday. David Skorton will leave his job as president of Cornell University to become the institution's 13th secretary since its founding in 1846.

Skorton becomes the first physician to lead the Smithsonian. He's a board-certified cardiologist and amateur jazz musician. Most importantly for the Smithsonian, he's a skilled fundraiser. Skorton led a team that raised $5 billion during his eight years at Cornell.

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Author Interviews
11:45 am
Mon March 10, 2014

'Blood Will Out' Reveals Secrets Of A Murderous Master Manipulator

The FBI pulled fingerprints off decades-old immigration papers to find Clark Rockefeller's true identity.
Lisa Poole AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 1:02 pm

Let's say you meet a Rockefeller — Clark Rockefeller — and suddenly you have this connection to a world of wealth and privilege. Or so you think, because one day you find out he's an imposter. And not just an imposter — a murderer.

That's what happened to Walter Kirn, and Kirn's a smart guy — he's a journalist and the author of two novels that have been adapted into films, Up In The Air and Thumbsucker. How he was deceived, and what the consequences were, is the subject of Kirn's new memoir, Blood Will Out.

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The Two-Way
11:32 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Family Trust Wins Supreme Court Fight Against Bike Trail

A Wyoming man has won a Supreme Court case fighting efforts to route the Medicine Bow Rail Trail through his family's property. On this map, the trail is the unmarked route moving from the lower right toward Fox Park, where Marvin Brandt lives.
Google Maps

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 3:20 pm

The federal government loses its control of land that's granted to railroad companies after the track has been abandoned, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday. The court sided with a private landowner in Wyoming who is fighting efforts to convert disused tracks into a bike path near his house.

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The Salt
10:50 am
Mon March 10, 2014

The Upside Of All This Cold? A Boom In Ice Cider

The icy winter is just what's needed for tasty ice cider.
Herb Swanson for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:41 pm

If there's anything most of us are tired of this winter, it's bone-chilling cold.
It's enough to drive you to drink.

Literally. Because frigid weather is just what some enterprising artisans need to make a dessert wine that has been showing up on trendy tables and menus. Ice cider was invented in Quebec in the 1990s.

This time of year, it's fermenting on the other side of the border as well, as a few snowy states try to tap into the locavore market and turn perishables into profits.

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It's All Politics
10:45 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Governors' Races Offer Promise For Democrats

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Corbett applauds a choir at The Salvation Army Ray and Joan Kroc Corps Community Center during a Jan. 29 news conference in Philadelphia.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:49 pm

Elections for governor could provide some good news for Democrats this fall, giving them the chance to regain ground in a few states where the party has had good fortune recently.

At this early stage, Republicans are expected to hold control of the House and pick up seats in the Senate — maybe even win a majority in the Senate.

But the GOP has fewer opportunities when it comes to statehouses. Republicans dominated state elections back in 2010, leaving them few openings this year. (Governors serve four-year terms everywhere but Vermont and New Hampshire.)

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The Two-Way
10:44 am
Mon March 10, 2014

Edward Snowden Tells SXSW He'd Leak Those Secrets Again

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 11:11 am

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency contractor who has leaked large amounts of classified information about the agency's electronic surveillance programs, spoke via video to a sympathetic audience at South By Southwest Interactive on Monday.

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