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3:08 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

March 15-21: Typhoid Mary, World War I And Reflections From The South

Harper

*Some of the language in the summaries above has been provided by publishers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Theater
3:00 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Deepwater, Center-Stage: Disaster Through Survivors' Eyes

Gary Barthelmy, Oyster Fisherman is a portrait by Reeva Wortel, used in conjunction with the production of Spill, a play that runs through March 30 at the Swine Palace in Baton Rouge.
Reeva Wortel

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Eleven died and hundreds of millions of gallons of oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico when BP's Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in 2010. But beneath the tragedy, there's a complex story about people's relationships to oil. That's what's explored in Spill, a new play by one of the creators of The Laramie Project.

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Around the Nation
3:00 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

With Less Financial Security, Older Workers Stay On The Job

Man signing a contract in his attorney's office.
Lisa F. Young iStockPhoto

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 3:22 pm

The laboratories at The Aerospace Corp. in El Segundo, Calif., look more like a bunch of stuff from the hardware store than the set from Star Trek. But physicist John Hurrell gazes at a nondescript collection of tubes with admiration. It's a transmission electron microscope.

"This is one of the pieces of equipment which will enable us to get down pretty well to atomic-level sensitivity," he says.

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Krulwich Wonders...
2:43 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

Booklist American Library Association

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 3:38 pm

This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That's what happened here — but this is a true story.

It's about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue ...

... just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland.

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Shots - Health News
2:36 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Young People Are Falling Into A Health Insurance Subsidy Gap

Ashante Thurston, John Riascos and Julieth Riascos talk with Mario Ricart, a private insurance agent, about buying health insurance at a kiosk at the Mall of the Americas in Miami last year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Some young people seeking to buy health insurance are finding themselves falling into a subsidy gap that leaves them ineligible for financial assistance that was heavily advertised.

Subsidies in the health law were designed to lower insurance costs for people who make around $11,000 to $46,000 a year.

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Shots - Health News
2:33 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Teens Say They Don't Text Or Drink While Driving

I'm not really texting. I'm checking my homework assignments.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 9:03 am

Many teen drivers are earnest when they say they know the risks of drinking and driving or texting behind the wheel. But it seems many either ignore those dangers or don't fully understand what it means to drive safely.

About half of teens who say they never text while driving admitted to texting at red lights or stop signs, according to a survey released Tuesday. And while 86 percent of teens consider driving under the influence to be dangerous, one in 10 who say they never drive under the influence actually do drive after drinking.

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Book Reviews
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Book Review: 'Falling Out Of Time'

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

"Falling Out of Time" is the name of a new novel by Israeli writer David Grossman. Our reviewer Alan Cheuse calls it a dramatic meditation on grief, reminiscent of Thornton Wilder's "Our Town." [POST-BROADCAST CLARIFICATION: The book was translated from the Hebrew by Jessica Cohen.]

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

The View From Russia: Crimea's Long-Awaited Return

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Well, now for a pro-Russian take on recent events, we turn once again to political scientist Andranik Migranyan. He's director of the Institute for Democracy and Cooperation. That's a Russian-funded think tank in New York. Welcome back to the program.

ANDRANIK MIGRANYAN: Oh, thank you for having me.

SIEGEL: When we spoke just over three weeks ago, you raised the subject of Crimea. So first question: Is Crimea unique among regions of Ukraine? Or could you see what happened there happening elsewhere in that country?

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Will Scotland Leave The UK? One Cafe Sells Cakes to Find Out

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Here's a referendum that would overturn centuries of history. Scotland is deciding whether to leave the United Kingdom. The U.K. is home to more than 60 million people. Scotland holds just about five million of those. They'll vote on independence in September.

NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Glasgow on the campaign.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: On a bland street near Glasgow's central train station, the Riverhill Coffee Bar announces itself with a vibrant blue facade. It's a teeny sliver of a place.

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Europe
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Ukrainian Ambassador: Today, Nobody In Europe Feels Secure

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Olexander Motsyk is Ukraine's ambassador to the United States and joins us by phone now. Welcome to the program, Mr. Ambassador.

UKRAINE AMBASSADOR OLEXANDER MOTSYK: Thank you.

SIEGEL: I want to ask you first, there are Ukrainian troops in Crimea. Will they remain there?

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Education
2:25 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Q&A: A Crash Course On Common Core

Cathy Cartier, a proponent of Common Core, teaches an English class at Affton High School in Missouri last month.
Christian Gooden MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Confused about the Common Core State Standards? Join the club. That's not to say the new benchmarks in reading and math are good or bad, working smoothly or kicking up sparks as the wheels come off. It is simply an acknowledgement that, when the vast majority of U.S. states adopt a single set of educational standards all at roughly the same time, a little confusion is inevitable.

Below is a handy FAQ about Common Core. We'll continue answering your questions in the coming months. You can post them in the comments section, or on Twitter and Facebook using #commonq.

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Law
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Nevada Court Quagmire Waits — And Waits — For Voters To Solve It

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The courts are clogged in Nevada. The state's Supreme Court says it is the busiest in the country. Nevada is one of just 10 states without an intermediate appeals court. A proposal to create one is on the ballot this fall.

And as Will Stone of Reno Public Radio reports, voters have rejected that idea in the past.

WILL STONE, BYLINE: On a given day, Barbara Buckley sees just about any kind of legal issue out there.

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News
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

After A Long Wait, 24 Models In Heroism Get Their Due

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

On today's program, in interviews and stories from NPR reporters, we're following events in Crimea, as well as the continuing search for Malaysian Air Flight 370.

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Education
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

As Common Core Tests Approach, So Does A Sea Change In Schools

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

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News
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Russia Votes To Annex Crimea, As The West Looks On

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Russia's President Vladimir Putin moved today to overturn recent history by reclaiming Crimea for Russia. Putin signed a treaty to annex Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula and gave a rousing speech to parliament laying out his case. He is also blasted the West for trying to frighten him with sanctions.

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U.S.
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

In Unprecedented International Search, American Navy Lends A Hand

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The search for the missing plane has expanded to a vast area, stretching from Kazakhstan in Central Asia to the southern ends of the vast Indian Ocean. For the latest on those efforts, we're joined now by Commander William Marks who is spokesperson for the U.S. 7th Fleet, the Navy's biggest fleet. Commander Marks, welcome.

COMMANDER WILLIAM MARKS: Thank you for having me. Appreciate it.

SIEGEL: And can you tell us where you are and what the U.S. Navy is doing in this search?

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Around the Nation
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Report: Emergency Response Inadequate In Airport Shooting

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Bad communication, faulty technology, and poor planning - those are just some of the issues highlighted in a report about the deadly shooting last year at Los Angeles International Airport. A TSA worker was killed in that attack and three people were wounded. NPR's Nathan Rott has more.

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News
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Deadly Violence Breaks Out At Crimean Military Base

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

I'm Robert Siegel.

On Sunday, Crimea was part of Ukraine. Yesterday, according to Russian President Vladimir Putin, Crimea was an independent country. And today Putin and Crimean officials signed a treaty to make the peninsula part of Russia. We're going to hear a Russian view of these events coming up.

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News
2:03 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Politics And Power Complicate The Airliner Search

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. We begin this hour with the politics of a vanishing airliner. The search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 now covers well over 2 million square miles. Twenty-six countries are still involved, 10 days after the plane's disappearance. In a few moments, we'll hear from the U.S. Navy about their efforts.

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The Salt
1:47 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

A Cold One For Everyone: Craft Beer Sales Surged In 2013

I'll Drink To That: Craft beer sales jumped 20 percent last year.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 6:38 am

If you think craft beer is seemingly everywhere these days, there's good reason. From bars and restaurants to supermarket aisles, the selection of locally made, often quirkily named brews has grown at an exponential rate.

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The Two-Way
1:11 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Report: NSA Can Record, Store Phone Conversations Of Whole Countries

Nicolas Armer DPA/LANDOV

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 2:17 pm

The United States has the capability to record "100 percent" of a country's phone calls, The Washington Post reports today citing people "with direct knowledge" and documents leaked by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden.

According to the paper, the U.S. keeps those recordings for a month. The paper adds:

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The Salt
12:33 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Thank Your Gut Bacteria For Making Chocolate Healthful

Bacteria in your gut can break down the antioxidants in chocolate into smaller, anti-inflammatory compounds.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 12:50 pm

Boy, it's a good time to be a dark-chocolate lover.

We've noted before the growing evidence that a daily dose of the bitter bean may help reduce blood pressure. There also seems to be a link between a regular chocolate habit and lower body weight.

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Author Interviews
11:59 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Feminism Is Fashionable For Nigerian Writer Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie won a National Book Critics Circle award for her novel Americanah.
Amy Ta NPR

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 9:48 pm

Nigerian Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie might be Africa's best-known young writer, but she's now making a big mark this side of the Atlantic.

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Author Interviews
11:45 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Cannibals And Colonialism: Solving The Mystery Of Michael Rockefeller

Michael Rockefeller, the youngest son of New York Gov. Nelson Rockefeller, was reported missing on Nov. 21, 1961
AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:14 pm

In 1961, the 23-year-old son of one of America's wealthiest families disappeared in a remote coastal area off the island of New Guinea in the South Pacific, a region inhabited by the Asmat, a tribe known to engage in headhunting and cannibalism.

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Book Reviews
11:45 am
Tue March 18, 2014

What U.S. Learned From 'Heathen School' Wasn't Part Of The Lesson Plan

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 7:51 am

Picture this. You're a young girl, living in a remote town in Connecticut in 1825. You've taken refuge in a neighbor's house and, as night falls, you peek out a window to see your friends and family members assembling outdoors around two crude paintings: One is of a young white woman (you); the other painting is of a man, a Native American.

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Music Interviews
11:45 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Jazz Composer Tries Something New With 'A Trumpet In The Morning'

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 9:46 am

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Marty Ehrlich is a jazz composer who plays clarinet and saxophones. But he doesn't play much on his latest album. He conducts his large ensemble performing his compositions. It's his first album devoted to his orchestral music.

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It's All Politics
11:43 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Top Democrat Insists Party Will Hold Senate — But Turnout Is Key

Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz speaks to party members during their meeting last summer in Scottsdale, Ariz.
Ross D. Franklin AP

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 1:00 pm

As increasingly confident Republican leaders predict big midterm election gains, the head of Democratic National Committee put on her game face Tuesday and insisted the party will hold control of the Senate.

The Democrats' grass-roots organization, said Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz, and what she characterized as the GOP's continuing alienation of women, minority, LGBT and middle-class voters, bodes well for her party this fall.

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The Two-Way
11:12 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Ukrainian Servicemen Reported Shot By Masked Soldiers In Crimea

Armed men, believed to be Russians, stand guard near the Ukrainian military base in Perevalnoye outside Simferopol, on Monday.
David Mdzinarishvili Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 3:51 pm

A Ukrainian serviceman reportedly was shot and killed and another wounded by masked assailants who stormed a base in Crimea's main city of Simferopol, hours after Russia announced it would annex the Black Sea peninsula.

Ukrainian military spokesman Vladislav Seleznyov tells Reuters by telephone from Crimea that it was unclear who the attackers were. He described them as "unknown forces, fully equipped and their faces covered."

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Shots - Health News
11:11 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Opting Out Of Your Insurance Plan's Network Can Be Costly

A vaccination that would be free inside a health plan's network can result in a bill when administered by an unapproved doctor.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 1:34 pm

Many plans sold on the health insurance marketplaces offer a trade-off: lower premiums in exchange for limited choices of doctors and hospitals. But consumers who opt for these plans with the idea that they'll go out of network when necessary may be taking a big financial risk.

The health law generally limits how much consumers can be required to pay out of pocket for medical care (not including premiums). In 2014, the limit for an individual plan is $6,350 and for a family plan, $12,700.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Is There A Method To Your March Madness?

Florida guard Scottie Wilbekin and his teammates are among the teams thought to have a strong chance of winning this year's NCAA men's basketball tournament. Are the Gators your pick?
Curtis Compton MCT/Landov

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 8:45 am

The odds are that somebody in your office or shop is trying to get you to toss a few bucks into the pool and fill out the brackets for this year's NCAA men's basketball tournament, which gets underway tonight. Fans of the women's championship might also be after you.

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