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The Protojournalist
9:13 am
Sat March 22, 2014

American Libraries Learn To Read Teenagers

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 3:12 pm

Way, way back in the 20th century, American teenagers turned to the local public library as a great good place to hang out. It was a hotspot for meeting up, and sharing thoughts with, other like-minded people – in books and in the flesh. It was a wormhole in the universe that gave us tunnels into the past and into the future. It was a quiet spot in an ever-noisier world.

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The Two-Way
8:40 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Cops Can't Have Sex With Prostitutes, Hawaiian Lawmakers Say

Waikiki Beach in Honolulu, with Diamond Head in the background. State lawmakers are vowing to get rid of a provision in Hawaiian law that allows law enforcement officers to have sex with prostitutes if doing so is within the scope of their duties.
Robyn Beck AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:36 am

Headlines across the nation and around the Web — such as the one we posted on Friday that read "In Hawaii, Sex With A Prostitute May Be Legal For Undercover Cops" — have led to promises of quick action:

-- "Hawaii lawmakers to end prostitution exemption," says Honolulu's KITV.

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Parallels
8:02 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Russia-U.S. Tensions Could Stall Syrian Chemical Weapons Removal

The Russian ship Pyotr Velikiy (Peter the Great), seen here docked in the Cypriot port of Limassol in February, is part of the team involved in escorting shipments of Syria's chemical weapons material for destruction.
AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

As U.S.-Russian relations sour, some observers fear the plan to eliminate Syria's chemical arsenal might stall.

This past week, the removal of chemicals from Syria reached the halfway mark. Without pressure from both superpowers, however, some believe Syrian President Bashar al-Assad will begin to drag his feet.

"I think what you're likely to see is that the Assad regime will comply just enough, at a slower pace, as it consolidates its hold over the country militarily," says Andrew Tabler, a Syria expert, at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy.

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Around the Nation
7:37 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Commuters Ditch Cars For Public Transit In Record Numbers

On a typical weekday, riders make a total of about 300,000 trips on the Chicago Metra commuter line.
M. Spencer Green AP

Originally published on Mon March 24, 2014 11:38 am

During the morning rush at Chicago's Union Station, commuter trains pull in, the doors open and a crush of people, newspapers and coffee cups in hand, pour off like a flood.

Financial analyst Nader Kouklan says he makes the trip from the suburbs to Chicago's downtown every day.

"It's easier and just a faster way to get to work, rather than having to deal with the traffic of the morning commute," Kouklan says.

Law student Amalia Romano rides Chicago's Metra line, too.

"I take it because I don't want to pay $16 to park every day," Romano explains.

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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Buffett's Billion Dollars Are Safe As Upsets Bust Brackets

George Washington University players were dejected Friday as they went down in defeat to Memphis. The team's loss also wiped out any chance for someone to win $1 billion from Quicken Loans and Warren Buffett.
Chuck Liddy MCT/Landov

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 5:59 am

Mercer University's stunning upset of Duke on Friday in the NCAA Division I men's basketball championship ruined most fans' brackets — the guesses they make before the 64 teams face each other about which team's going to win every game.

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Movie Interviews
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Bertrand Tavernier, Playing Geopolitics For Laughs

Director Bertrand Tavernier (center) with Thierry Lhermitte and Raphael Personnaz on the set of The French Minister, a comedy about a dervish of a diplomat trying to head off a war.
Sundance Selects

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

French filmmaker Bertrand Tavernier has done some serious work. In The Clockmaker, a man's adult son commits an act of terrorism. In 'Round Midnight, an aging jazz musician struggles with addictions. And Sunday in the Country is about a man visiting his aging father.

But Tavernier's new film, The French Minister, is a comedy, inspired by both real life and old movies. It's based on a graphic novel the director read in a single night, in the first week the book was published.

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Movie Interviews
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

When Scripture Hits The Screen, Filmmakers Say Their Prayers

Russell Crowe, the lead in Darren Aronofsky's forthcoming biblical epic Noah, may have received a quick blessing from Pope Francis at a recent public audience, but the movie is drawing criticism in some quarters.
Niko Tavernise Paramount Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

The film Noah, with Russell Crowe in the title role, opens in the U.S. March 28. It's already been banned in several Muslim countries for portraying a man considered a prophet, and here in this country it's stirred controversy among some Christians for not being a sufficiently literal telling of the Bible story. NPR's Scott Simon spoke with Rajinder Dudrah, senior lecturer in screen studies at the University of Manchester, on why religious figures in film can cause both fascination and offense.

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Latin America
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Leaving Behind The Cartel's 'Songs Of Death'

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 10:07 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Narcocorridos are a form of Mexican folk music that tell the tales of drug traffickers. They are tremendously popular in Mexico and the Southwest borderlands. NPR's John Burnett has this story of one ex-Narcocorrido singer who escaped that life and lived to tell the tale.

JOHN BURNETT, BYLINE: When Jorge Rivera, stage name El Imperial, watches old images of himself on YouTube these days, he's filled with conflicted feelings.

JORGE RIVERA: (Foreign language spoken)

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Europe
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

How Much Will Russian Sanctions Hurt The EU?

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. U.S. and European leaders have been weighing how to try to tighten economic screws on Russia following its seizure of Crimea. But how much economic pain can the U.S. inflict on Russia without hurting itself in return? We're joined now by Ian Bremmer, who's president of the global risk research firm Eurasia Group. He joins us from New York. Thanks so much for being with us.

IAN BREMMER: Scott, delighted to be with you.

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Middle East
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

In A 'Brilliant' Move, Hamas Puts A Woman Out Front

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Isra al-Modallal is the first woman to be the public face of Hamas, the conservative group that rules the Palestinian territory. "Brilliant" is how one Gaza observer describes the decision.

Europe
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Russia Warns It May Undercut Iran Talks Over Sanctions

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The U.S. and Russia are also supposed to be cooperating on Iran. Russia's played an important role in attempting to negotiate restrictions on Iran's nuclear program. But Russia's deputy foreign minister recently suggested that Moscow might change it's position on those talks because of the disagreement over Crimea and Ukraine. NPR's Peter Kenyon joins us from Istanbul. Peter, thanks for being with us.

PETER KENYON, BYLINE: Hi, Scott.

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Europe
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Polish See Shades Of 1939 In Russia's Crimea Grab

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

What will Mr. Putin do next? A lot of people want to know but the question is especially urgent and personal for those living in a country that shares a border with Ukraine and that have a long and bitter history of being invaded, occupied and dominated: Poland. We're joined now by Konstanty Gebert. He's a columnist for Gazeta Wyborcza, one of the leading newspapers in Poland. He joins us from his home in Warsaw. Mr. Gebert, thanks very much for being with us.

KONSTANTY GEBERT: My pleasure.

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Europe
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Russia Formalizes Its Takeover Of Crimea

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Russian forces have taken a major air force base in the Crimea. Belbek airbase was one of the few military facilities in the Crimean Peninsula that was still controlled by Ukraine after the annexation of the peninsula by Russian forces. NPR's Gregory Warner is in Crimea's capital of Simferopol. Gregory, thanks for being with us.

GREGORY WARNER, BYLINE: Sure, Scott.

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Simon Says
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

A Tatar's Death Chills Those Who Suffered Under Russia Before

Crimean Tatars carry the body of Reshat Ametov during his funeral outside the town of Simferopol on Tuesday.
Vasily Fedosenko Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Amid all the of necessary analysis of what Russia's move into Crimea means geopolitically and strategically, it might also be good to remember Reshat Ametov.

Mr. Ametov was buried this week. He was 39 years old, married and the father of three young children.

He was last seen at a demonstration on March 3 in Simferopol, where he joined other Crimean Tatars held a silent protest before the pro-Russian armed men in unmarked uniforms who surrounded the cabinet ministers building.

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Movie Interviews
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

'Flaco And Max' Keep A South Texas Musical Tradition Thriving

Originally published on Sun March 23, 2014 9:45 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Conjunto music can be as American as cherry pie - with Mexican and German flavoring:

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

FLACO AND MAX: (Singing in foreign language)

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Sports
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Mercer, Dayton Break The Brackets

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: And the upsets keep coming in the NCAA tournament. Do they call it March Madness because Coach K at Duke, probably a little mad at the way his Blue Devils played. ESPN.com's Howard Bryant joins us. Howard, thanks so much for being with us.

HOWARD BRYANT: Oh, good morning, Scott.

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Animals
5:50 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Put Haggis In The Feeder, And Other Scottish Bird Feeding Tips

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Springtime is just about to bloom. So how do you attract a few good-looking birds? To the gardener balcony, that is. We're joined now by Malcie Smith, the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. He joins us from the studios of the BBC in the Shetland Islands of Scotland. Thanks very much for being with us.

MALCIE SMITH: Hi, Scott. You're welcome.

SIMON: What kind of food do you put out this time of year?

SMITH: Just a wide range of nuts and seeds would be quite good. Sunflower seeds particularly are very good.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Extraordinary Ladies Battle Across Berlin In 'Roses'

Grab your spats and your ray gun! It's time for another volume of the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen's adventures. Nemo: The Roses of Berlin has everything one looks for in Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's saga: steampunk, alternate history, elements from boys' adventure tales and the flavor of '30s movie serials. The latest episode might better be called the League of Extraordinary Ladies, actually: There's a female protagonist, a female villain and a female robot — the latter none other than the false Maria from the 1927 film Metropolis.

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The Two-Way
4:55 am
Sat March 22, 2014

More Satellite Images, But Still No Sure Sign Of Missing Jet

This satellite image, taken on March 18, has intensified the search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in the Indian Ocean about 1,500 miles southwest of Perth, Australia. The image was released Saturday by Chinese authorities.
Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 2:05 pm

Update at 11:15 a.m. ET. "The Object Was Not Sighted" Today Australian Authorities Say:

Aircraft searching the Indian Ocean on Saturday for any sign of a Malaysia Airlines jet that's been missing for two weeks did not spot the large object seen in a newly analyzed satellite image, Australia's Maritime Safety Authority reports.

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It's All Politics
3:16 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Why Are We Hauling Pennsylvania Coal All The Way To Germany?

Several tons of anthracite coal fill a basement space in Pottsville, Pa.
Bradley C. Bower AP

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:25 am

There are budget earmarks from powerful congressmen, earmarks from not-so-powerful congressmen and, as it turns out for an old mining town in Pennsylvania's Appalachians, there's even an earmark from a long-dead congressman.

In the 1960s and 70s, powerful Democrat Daniel Flood worked to find a federal government buyer for the anthracite coal mined in his district. He succeeded: Some five decades later, the heat coming off the radiators at the U.S. military's installation at Kaiserslautern, Germany, is still generated by burning Pennsylvania anthracite.

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Krulwich Wonders...
3:03 am
Sat March 22, 2014

I Can't Believe What I'm Seeing: A Springtime (Froggy) Miracle

NOVA scienceNOW

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:19 am

Two weeks ago this animal was frozen solid. If you found one in the woods, packed in the topsoil, hiding under a leaf, you could pull it from the ground and it would feel like an ashtray. You could bang it (lightly) on a table — it would go, "Konk!" like a rock. It doesn't seem to be breathing. It reacts to nothing. It's so dead. Or seems to be. And then, this (I want to call it a miracle) happens ...

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Movie Interviews
3:00 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Doomed 'Dune' Was Generations Ahead Of Its Time

Artwork created for Dune by British science fiction artist Chris Foss.
Courtesy of Chris Foss/Sony Pictures Classics

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 9:18 am

Dune, by Alejandro Jodorowsky, was an ambitious and expensive film that was going to change cinema — and, the filmmaker imagined, the world.

Jodorowsky had already made a name for himself with El Topo in 1970 and The Holy Mountain in 1973, two movies that more or less invented the "midnight movie" phenomenon back when that was a euphemism for tripping.

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The Salt
3:00 am
Sat March 22, 2014

Remember Fat-Free Mania? Take Our Survey

The 1990s were rife with low-fat packaged snacks, from potato chips to cookies.
Youtube and RetroJunk

If it was fat-free, it was good for us. That was the message we got from food marketers in the 1990s.

Just look back at some of the food ads from the era. Granola bars were healthy, as long as you removed the fat and added in some sugar. Same with yogurt: Skim off the fat, add sugar.

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The Two-Way
6:29 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Obama Meets With Tech CEOs About Privacy

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, right, arrives at the White House for an Oval Office meeting with President Obama on Friday in Washington, DC.
Alex Wong Getty Images

For the second time in recent months, President Obama welcomed a cadre of tech CEOs to the White House to talk about data privacy.

Politico reports:

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Satellites' Scope And The Search For A Plane

Satellite imagery provided to the Australian Maritime Safety Authority of objects that may be possible debris of the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370.
Australian Maritime Safety Authority

Originally published on Fri March 21, 2014 6:12 pm

The search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 is now concentrated in the southern Indian Ocean, with satellite clues bringing aircraft and ships closer to objects that could be the debris from the missing airliner.

But as NPR's Robert Siegel said on All Things Considered Friday, "This is not like finding a needle in a haystack. In this case, the haystack is vast and the needle could be moving."

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:49 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Not My Job: We Ask Football And Old Spice Star Terry Crews About Cruises

Anderson Group

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:03 am

Before he was the star of a hilarious series of Old Spice commercials, Terry Crews played for the championship Western Michigan University Broncos in Kalamazoo, where we are taping the show this week. He went on to play in the NFL and have a successful acting career, including roles in Everybody Hates Chris, Idiocracy, and Brooklyn Nine-Nine.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:49 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Prediction

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:03 am

Our panelists predict what will be the next great discovery in our universe.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:49 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:03 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:49 pm
Fri March 21, 2014

Limericks

Originally published on Sat March 22, 2014 10:03 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Mr. Right (Foot), The Canine King's Speech, McNuggetsaurus.

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