NPR News

Pages

History
5:59 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Helen Keller's Glimpse Of Beethoven's 'Heavenly Vibration'

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Read more
All Tech Considered
5:40 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Tech Week: Smartphones And You, Virtual Reality, NPR Plays

The Oculus Rift virtual reality headset is now part of Facebook's empire.
Jeff Chiu AP

The tech news cycle didn't stop churning this week, with the fairy tale story of the Kickstarter-backed Oculus VR getting purchased by Facebook for $2 billion, the flop of a Candy Crush IPO and Turkey banning YouTube after already

Read more
Poetry
5:03 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Dark, Remarkable Poems Show 'How To Dance' Amid Economic Despair

Courtesy of Greywolf Press

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 2:18 pm

Nick Lantz speaks from the failed and fallen heart of middle-class Americans, the everyday folks whose lives and bank accounts were gutted when the housing bubble burst. What does that heartbreak look like? Deeper and uglier than plunging stock market charts and foreclosure signs, and more personal. Welcome to an America in which ambition is turned upside down, where someone is likely to say, when asked what he's doing for work these days, "you know those cracks people fall through?/ We're the crack regulators, we keep/ those cracks up to code."

Read more
Author Interviews
3:39 am
Sat March 29, 2014

A Grand Tradition Of Family Drama In 'Cavendon Hall'

Originally published on Tue April 1, 2014 10:33 am

Barbara Taylor Bradford is one of the best-selling authors in the world — and, proudly, a working stiff. She's written 29 novels, beginning with A Woman of Substance in 1979, which became one of the best-selling novels of all time. Her books have been published in more than 90 countries and 40 languages.

Her latest is Cavendon Hall, which takes its title from the great old Edwardian home shared by two families: the aristocratic Inghams and the Swanns, who've served the Inghams since time immemorial.

Read more
The Salt
3:38 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Batter Up: Baseball Just Got Its Most Decorated Corn Dog

The Diamondbacks' D-bat Dog is an18-inch corn dog filled with cheese, bacon and jalapeño.
@DBACKS VIA TWITTER

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:27 am

Inside the kitchen of the Arizona Diamondbacks, chef Michael Snoke has created a monster: 18 inches of meat that's skewered, wrapped in cornbread, stuffed with bacon and infused with cheddar cheese and jalapeños.

All that rests on a bed of fries. And for $25, it's all yours.

"I have created the D-Bat," he says.

The Diamondback's executive chef has wanted to get in on the culinary competition that's sprung up between Major League Baseball teams.

Read more
Sports
3:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Would March Be Less Mad If Players Were Paid?

Arizona guard Gabe York (1) pulls down a rebound as teammate Rondae Hollis-Jefferson (23) watches during a regional semifinal NCAA college basketball tournament game against San Diego State, Thursday in Anaheim, Calif.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 8:44 am

Would March Madness be terribly different if the players were paid?

Probably not. The college basketball tournament might become more professionalized, but it wouldn't look much different from what we're seeing right now.

"I don't see it changing one iota," says ESPN basketball analyst Jay Bilas.

Read more
Parallels
3:37 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Made In China — But Was It Made In A Prison?

Products produced by prison labor in China are on display at the Laogai Museum in Washington, D.C.
Shujie Leng NPR

Originally published on Mon March 31, 2014 8:14 am

An Oregon woman was looking at her Halloween decoration last year when she found a letter written by an inmate from one of China's re-education-through-labor camps. The letter spoke of brutal forced labor in the camp.

Read more
Parallels
3:36 am
Sat March 29, 2014

Dans Le Train, French Spend Their Commute Learning English

David Potier, head of commercial relations with France's state rail company, promotes the English classes and Canadian Afton Piercy is one of the teachers.
Eleanor Beardsley NPR

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 9:18 am

On some French trains, the conductor's whistle signals more than just a departure. For commuters traveling on an express train from Reims to Paris — a 90-mile, 45-minute ride — it means the beginning of English class.

"Before the course, we were sleeping in the train in the morning," says passenger-student Gilles Hallais. "So I prefer practicing English."

Hallais, 44, is a journalist at French public radio. He says while he doesn't need English for his work, he does need it for his life. "I think it could be a handicap if I don't speak fluent English."

Read more
The Two-Way
6:50 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Breaking Tradition, Pope Confesses His Sins In Public

Pope Francis leads a mass at St Peter's basilica on Friday at the Vatican.
Alberto Pizzoli AFP/Getty Images

Pope Francis broke tradition, again, today by confessing his sins in public.

Read more
It's All Politics
6:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In Politics, Hog Castration Cuts Through The Ad Clutter

A lot more people now know who Iowa Republican Senate candidate Joni Ernst is, which was the point of the hog-castration line in her campaign ad.
YouTube screen shot Joni Ernst for Senate YouTube channel

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 9:14 pm

One candidate talks fondly about castrating hogs in her youth and suggests that could be a useful skill in Washington.

Another fires semi-automatic weapons at a 2-foot-high stack of paper representing the Affordable Care Act before feeding it through a wood chipper.

Read more
Movie Reviews
6:02 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

For Two Brothers, Life Creeps Into The Paradise Of Summer Break

Brothers Tommy (Ryan Jones) and Eric (Nathan Varnson), and their group of friends spend much of their summer hanging out in the woods and abandoned buildings near their small New Jersey town.
Courtesy of Tribeca Film

For parents dreading the prospect of their kids spending summer locked in air-conditioned basements with nothing but the glow of computer, TV, and tablet screens to keep them company, the opening scenes of Hide Your Smiling Faces will surely inspire wistful sighs.

Read more
Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
5:37 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Violinist Itzhak Perlman Gets Quizzed On Ron Perlman

Dr. Scott M. Lieberman AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 9:25 am

Violinist Itzhak Perlman has played for presidents and the Queen of England, but the high point of his career is obviously for him to be right here, playing the NPR news quiz.

We've invited him to play a game called "You're no Hellboy." Three questions for Izhak Perlman about actor Ron Perlman from Hellboy, Beauty and the Beast and Sons of Anarchy.

Read more
The Two-Way
5:03 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Defense Says FBI Wanted Marathon Bombing Suspect As Informant

Tamerlan Tsarnaev in April 2009.
Barcroft Media Barcroft Media /Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 5:34 pm

Defense attorneys for suspected Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev say sometime before the bombing his older brother, Tamerlan, was approached by the FBI and was asked to be an informant.

In a letter from February made public in a motion filed in federal court today, the attorneys say the FBI made "more than one visit" to talk to Tamerlan and two of his associates.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:41 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

GM Recalls More Cars Over Possible Faulty Ignition Switches

A 2010 Chevrolet Cobalt coupe sits on display at General Motors headquarters in Detroit in 2009.
David Zalubowski AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 5:35 am

General Motors is recalling an additional 824,000 small cars in the U.S., adding to the 1.37 million it recalled domestically last month, citing possible faulty ignition switches.

Worldwide, the latest announcement affects a total of 971,000 vehicles, on top of the 1.6 million recalled globally in February.

Read more
Code Switch
4:26 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Why A Proper Lady Found Herself Behind Bars

Mary Peabody leaves the dining room of a motel in St. Augustine, Fla., on March 31, 1964, after being arrested.
Harold Valentine AP

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 8:55 pm

This story is part of NPR's 50th anniversary coverage of 1964.

Read more
The Two-Way
4:14 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Obama And Putin Talk About Diplomatic Solution To Ukraine Crisis

Russian President Vladimir Putin called President Obama to "discuss the U.S. proposal for a diplomatic resolution to the crisis in Ukraine," the White House said on Friday.

Obama, the White House said, suggested Russia "put a concrete response in writing" to a proposal delivered by Secretary of State John Kerry to Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov during their meeting at the Hague this week.

The presidents agreed that Kerry and Lavrov should meet "to discuss next steps."

Read more
Author Interviews
4:01 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In 'Storied Life,' Characters Come With A Reading List

Jan Sandvik iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Thirty-nine year old widower A.J. Fikry is an unlikely romantic hero: He's cranky, he drinks too much, his bookstore is failing and don't get him started on the state of publishing. He's also at the center of Gabrielle Zevin's new novel, The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry.

Read more
Movie Reviews
4:01 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Send Out The Doves: 'Noah' Lands On Solid Ground

Ila (Emma Watson) and her husband, Shem, are two passengers aboard the ark built by Noah to escape God's flood in Noah, Darren Aronofsky's imagining of the biblical tale.
Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:42 pm

The story of Noah's Ark is getting blockbuster treatment in Hollywood's new biblical epic Noah. Darren Aronofsky's film about the Old Testament shipbuilder has been sparking controversy — but there's no denying that the Great Flood, digitized, is a pretty great flood.

Read more
This Week's Must Read
4:01 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

An Ode To Our Newest Neighbor: Biden, The Pink Dwarf Planet

two planets
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

This week, astronomers discovered a new dwarf planet at the outer reaches of our solar system. It's a pink, icy ball that's beyond Pluto's orbit. Its official name is 2012 VP113, but scientists have given it the nickname "Biden."

Read more
NPR Story
3:44 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Sabiduria: Learning Latino

Latino USA's producer Camilo Vargas hails from Colombia. He identifies himself as a Latin American, not Latino, and discovers the true meaning of being Latino in America.

NPR Story
3:44 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Latinos on TV

The Bachelor on ABC starred a Latino. Shakira came back as coach on NBC's The Voice. But Antonia Cereijido reports, having Latinos in mainstream shows does not solve issues in media representation.

NPR Story
3:44 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Starting Over For Music

Bass player JT Lopez had a career as a top session musician in his native Puerto Rico. He left it all behind to pursue another dream – playing rock 'n' roll with a band in L.A. Diane Bock Reports.

The Two-Way
3:41 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In U.S., Mudslides Common, But Usually Few Deaths

Workers use heavy equipment to clear trees and other debris, near Darrington, Wash., on Thursday.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Sat March 29, 2014 1:31 am

Washington state, with its many steep slopes, streams and rivers and some of the heaviest annual rainfall in the country, is a mudslide waiting to happen. Add in soil erosion from logging, as was reportedly the case near the community of Oso before last week's tragedy, and the probability of such an event increases.

Read more
The Two-Way
3:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Norwegian Jens Stoltenberg Will Be NATO's Next Secretary-General

Former Norwegian Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg pauses during an address to the media in Oslo on Friday, after NATO ambassadors chose him to be the next head of the alliance.
NTB Scanpix Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 5:29 pm

Jens Stoltenberg, a former prime minister of Norway, has been appointed to succeed Anders Fogh Rasmussen as NATO secretary-general, a post he will assume in October.

In an address in Oslo after he was selected by NATO ambassadors, Stoltenberg on Friday called the crisis over Ukraine "a brutal reminder of how important NATO is.

"I want to express my support that NATO does not accept the changing of borders by force within Europe," he said. "NATO has once again proven its relevance."

Read more
Around the Nation
3:17 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Families Mourn Missing As Search Continues In Washington State

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Audie Cornish speaks with Washington resident Diana Bejvl, who presumably has lost her son, Alan, and his fiancee, Delaney Webb, in the Washington area mudslide. Her grandparents are also missing.

Politics
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Week In Politics: Obama In Brussels And A Bridge Scandal Report

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And we pick up there with our Friday regulars E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Hey there, E.J.

E.J. DIONNE: Hey.

CORNISH: And David Brooks of The New York Times. Hey David.

DAVID BROOKS: How are you?

CORNISH: So I want to continue the conversation about President Obama and go back to a speech he gave in Brussels on Wednesday. In it, he spoke about Russia, about NATO, about bigger ideas about the U.S. role in the world.

Read more
World
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Obama Aims To Soothe Strained Relations In Saudi Arabia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

President Obama met Friday with the king of Saudi Arabia. There's considerable friction in the U.S.-Saudi relationship at the moment, with key differences over Syria and Iran.

Business
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Russia's Energy Market Heft Leaves Neighbors Unsettled

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The crisis in Ukraine is raising new questions about Russia's role in the energy markets. Moscow has long used exports of oil and natural gas to win political concessions from countries on its borders. Europe gets a quarter of its natural gas from Russia.

As NPR's Jim Zarroli reports, that's making a lot of people there nervous.

Read more
World
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

In Ukraine's Industrial Heart, An Economic Affinity With Russia

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:34 pm

In Eastern Ukraine, the country's industrial heartland, many workers fear for their jobs if Ukraine joins the European Union.

World
3:10 pm
Fri March 28, 2014

Egyptian Town Reeling Over Mass Death Sentence

Originally published on Fri March 28, 2014 4:38 pm

More than 500 people in Matea, Egypt, have been sentenced to death. On one street alone, a juice store owner, a sweets shop owner, a doctor and more than 20 others have been condemned.

Pages