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Monkey See
11:39 am
Fri January 10, 2014

HBO's 'True Detective' Brings Big Stars To Tell A Brutal Tale

Woody Harrelson and Matthew McConaughey star in HBO's series True Detective.
JIm Bridges HBO

Woody Harrelson has a simple explanation for how he handled playing the same detective over a 17-year span of time for HBO's newest foray into quality TV, True Detective.

"I just took off my wig," joked Harrelson, sporting a beard and his naturally receding hairline for a press conference here Thursday to tell a roomful of TV critics about HBO's attempt to reinvent the buddy cop story.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Same-Sex Couples In Utah Made Eligible For Federal Benefits

Chris Serrano, left, and Clifton Webb embrace after being married on Dec. 20 in the Salt Lake County Clerk's Office in Salt Lake City.
Kim Raff AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 1:35 pm

"Attorney General Eric Holder announced Friday that the federal government will recognize the 900-plus same-sex marriages that took place in Utah during the two weeks when such unions were legal," NPR's Nina Totenberg writes for us.

That means those couples "will be eligible for all federal benefits," NPR's Carrie Johnson adds.

In a statement, Holder says that:

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NPR Story
11:09 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Marian McPartland On Piano Jazz, Part Two

Piano Jazz continues with part two of a monumental session (here's part one), as host Marian McPartland sits down as a guest on the program with guest host Elvis Costello. In this all-new interview, McPartland and Costello celebrate more moments from 30-plus years of Piano Jazz.

Beginnings In England

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The Salt
10:52 am
Fri January 10, 2014

A Green-Movement Website Shakes Up The Debate Over GMOs

After Grist's six-month-long series on genetically modified foods, some loyal readers accused the site of changing directions in the debate.
iStockphoto

A 26-part series on genetically modified food was not Nathanael Johnson's idea. And he didn't realize it would take six months, either.

Last year, Johnson was hired as the new food writer for Grist, a website for environmental news and opinion. Grist's editor, Scott Rosenberg, was waiting with an assignment: Dig into the controversy over GMOs.

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Around the Nation
10:45 am
Fri January 10, 2014

On Monday's Show: Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Former Defense Secretary Robert Gates has been making news all week with his forthcoming memoir. Gates recounts his years leading the Pentagon under both Presidents Bush and Obama during a time of two wars. Yesterday, Gates sat down with Steve. It was his first interview since his book exploded in the headlines, and he's arguing that the book is being misconstrued. We will be broadcasting the interview Monday, but thought we'd take a chance to preview it with Steve here in the studio.

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Shots - Health News
10:28 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Why Hospitals And Families Still Struggle To Define Death

Erick Munoz stands by a photo of his wife, Marlise Munoz, at home in Fort Worth, Texas, on Jan. 3. She is being kept on life support in a local hospital against the family's wishes.
Fort Worth Star-Telegram MCT via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:33 am

Death seems one of life's few certainties, but the cases of a girl and a young woman who are being kept on life support even though they are legally dead show how difficult it still can be to agree on the end of life.

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The Two-Way
10:06 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Gates Says His Points About Obama Have Been Mischaracterized

Robert Gates waves and President Obama claps at the then-defense secretary's farewell ceremony in June 2011.
Jason Reed Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:08 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': Steve Inskeep and David Greene discuss NPR's interview with Robert Gates

Reports this week about former Defense Secretary Robert Gates' new book have implied that he thinks President Obama approved a 2009 troop surge in Afghanistan "believing the strategy would fail," as NPR's Steve Inskeep said on Friday's Morning Edition.

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The Two-Way
9:54 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Central African Republic's President Resigns At Regional Summit

Central African Republic's interim President Michel Djotodia sits during a conference in Bangui in this Dec. 8 file photo. Djotodia resigned Friday after a two-day summit in neighboring Chad.
Herve Serefio Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:17 am

Central African Republic's interim president resigned Friday under pressure from fellow leaders at a regional summit to end the violence in his country.

Michel Djotodia and Prime Minister Nicolas Tiangaye resigned at the regional meeting in Chad.

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Politics
9:46 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Digging Into 'Duty: Memoirs Of A Secretary At War'

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 10:48 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to turn now to a story getting a lot of buzz in Washington. "Duty: Memoirs of a Secretary at War," written by former Defense Secretary Robert Gates, isn't scheduled to be released until next week, but some journalists have already gotten their copies and it's already making headlines.

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Economy
9:46 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Why Getting A Job Doesn't Mean Getting Out Of Poverty

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:47 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. This week, we, like many of our colleagues, have been talking about poverty because this week marks 50 years after President Lyndon Johnson declared a war on poverty. Later this hour, we'll speak with a minister who now preaches from the same pulpit where the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. once stood in Atlanta - Ebenezer Baptist Church. And he's asking whether the black church is still a force for addressing issues like poverty. That's later.

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Monkey See
9:30 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Pop Culture Happy Hour: In One Year And Out The Other

NPR
  • Listen to Pop Culture Happy Hour

Every year at this time, we at Pop Culture Happy Hour sit down to make some resolutions and predictions for the coming year. And, of course, we engage in the sometimes painful exercise of seeing how last year's resolutions and predictions turned out.

Well.

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The Two-Way
9:30 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Franklin McCain, One Of 'Greensboro Four,' Dies

(From left) Joseph McNeil and Franklin McCain, two of the Greensboro Four who the day before had sat at the "whites only" counter of a Woolworth store, came back on Feb. 2, 1960, with two others — Billy Smith and Clarence Henderson.
Jack Moebes/Greensboro News & Record

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:08 pm

Franklin McCain, one of the "Greensboro Four" who in 1960 sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in North Carolina and launched a sit-in movement that would soon spread to cities across the nation, has died.

North Carolina A&T State University said Friday morning that McCain died Thursday "after a brief illness at Moses Cone Hospital in Greensboro."

Our colleagues at WUNC report that McCain had just turned 73. Other news outlets are reporting he was 71.

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Shots - Health News
8:02 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Maryland's Bold Plan To Curb Hospital Costs Gets Federal Blessing

Hospitals in Maryland may soon have an unusual, new way to make money.
iStockphoto

Maryland health officials have reached an unprecedented deal to limit medical spending and abandon decades of expensively paying hospitals for each extra procedure they perform.

If the plan works, Maryland hospitals will be financially rewarded for keeping people out of the hospital — a once unimaginable arrangement.

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Parallels
7:58 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Cuba, Land Of The $250,000 Family Sedan

Cubans look at new and used foreign-made cars for sale at a car dealer in Havana on Jan. 3.
Adalberto Roque AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 11:57 am

For the first time in more than 50 years, the Cuban government began selling new and used vehicles last week to anyone with the money to buy one. And as crowds gathered at state-owned car lots in Havana to check out the inventory, a consensus quickly emerged.

The cars on sale had either been priced by callous, greedy idiots, or the Cuban government had become the most incompetent automobile retailer in the world.

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The Two-Way
7:09 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Economy Adds Only 74,000 Jobs In December; Jobless Rate At 6.7 Percent

Sign of the times? A "help wanted" sign in the window of a Philadelphia business last year.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 12:08 pm

  • On 'Morning Edition': NPR's Yuki Noguchi and David Greene preview the jobs report
We'll be posting updates after the report's 8:30 a.m. ET release.

There were only 74,000 jobs added to public and private payrolls in December, but the unemployment rate fell to a 5-year low 6.7 percent, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Friday morning.

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Africa
6:47 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Central African Republic President Resigns

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
6:42 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Top Stories: Mixed Employment Report; West Virginia Water Crisis

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 8:02 am

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The Two-Way
6:28 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Target Says 70 Million Individuals' Data May Have Been Stolen

Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 7:52 am

The size of the data breach at Target Co. stores late last year took a sharp rise Friday when the retailer said it now estimates that up to 70 million individuals may have had information that includes their "names, mailing addresses, phone numbers or email addresses" stolen.

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The Two-Way
5:53 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Book News: Will Your Book Sell? There's An Algorithm For That

The study "reveals an intriguing and unexpected observation on the connection between readability and the literary success — that they correlate into the opposite directions."
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 6:38 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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The Two-Way
5:17 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Chemical Leak Causes Water Emergency In West Virginia; Plant Shut Down

In Charleston, W.Va., the shelves of this Kroger supermarket had been nearly stripped of bottled water on Thursday. Residents rushed to buy water after a chemical spill led officials to warn that they not use what's coming out of their taps.
Tyler Evert AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 5:13 pm

More than 100,000 customers of one water company in West Virginia have been warned not to drink, cook or wash with the water coming from their taps because of chemicals that seeped into the Elk River near Charleston on Thursday.

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It's All Politics
5:02 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Bitcoin Takes Stage In Texas Senate Campaign

angering the feds). Bitcoin is a virtual currency that has been the subject of a recent Federal Election Commission discussion." href="/post/bitcoin-takes-stage-texas-campaign" class="noexit lightbox">
One man produced physical versions of bitcoins (before he realized he was angering the feds). Bitcoin is a virtual currency that has been the subject of a recent Federal Election Commission discussion.
Rick Bowmer AP

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 7:33 am

When Texas Rep. Steve Stockman announced recently that he'll accept donations in bitcoins, he raised some eyebrows.

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Business
3:18 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Safety Group Sues Buckyballs Founder In Product Recall Case

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A federal government agency has taken and unusual step. They are suing the founder of a toy company over product safety concerns - and recently, he filed a countersuit. The Consumer Product Safety Commission says Buckyballs - if you're not familiar with them - these are clusters of magnetized balls, are a serious danger to children.

Ilya Marritz from member station WNYC has the story.

ILYA MARRITZ, BYLINE: Call them brainteasers, amusements, or gifts for dad, just don't call these little magnetic beads a toy.

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Business
3:16 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Alcoa To Pay $384 Million Penalty For Bahrain Bribes

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And let's keep talking about international trade here. The American aluminum giant Alcoa and one of its subsidiaries will pay $384 million in fines to the United States government for engaging in corrupt practices overseas.

The payment is part of a settlement in a bribery case involving the royal family of Bahrain.

NPR's John Ydstie reports.

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Afghanistan
3:15 am
Fri January 10, 2014

'Pious Spy' Article Casts Doubt On Taliban Chief's Death

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It really wasn't that many years ago, the 1990s, when a power struggle waged by warlords in Afghanistan ended up bringing the Taliban to power in that country. Journalist Mujib Mashal was just a boy when the Taliban marched into Kabul. And in the January issue of Harpers he writes about one of the more memorable characters in that repressive regime: The Minister of Intelligence.

Renee Montagne reached him in Kabul.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Africa
3:13 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Fighting In South Sudan Forces Residents To Seek Safety

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

On a Friday, it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene.

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Technology
3:08 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Startups Often Focus On Data Security Too Late, If At All

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This year's Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas includes companies that promise to revolutionize medicine as we know it. They're using sensors and systems like Wi-Fi Internet connections and Bluetooth to monitor the human body on a constant, real-time basis. Critics say this high-tech medicine is leaving security concerns behind.

Aarti Shahani reports from member station KQED.

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Middle East
3:05 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Turkish Scandal Shines Light On 'Shadowy' Muslim Leader

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Politics
3:01 am
Fri January 10, 2014

U.S. Slow To Allow Syrian Refugees To Emmigrate

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. As listeners to this program know, the Syrian civil war has created a vast refugee crisis. More than two million people have fled the country. Many have fled their homes inside that country. People are overwhelming the countries around Syria where they often live in crowded makeshift camps or fan out among the population.

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Around the Nation
3:01 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Christie 'Heartbroken' Circle Of Trust' Was Violated

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 9:03 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie gave an epic press conference yesterday. It went on for almost two hours, almost as long as the traffic jams that prompted him to meet with the press in the first place. Governor Christie denied knowing about the plan carried out by members of his staff to deliberately clog traffic going from Fort Lee, New Jersey over a bridge to Manhattan.

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Economy
3:01 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Minimum Wage Loses Ground Since Its Banner Year In 1968

Protesters rally outside of a Wendy's in Brooklyn, New York, on Dec. 5 in support of raising fast food wages from $7.25 to $15 per hour.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:45 am

This week, we've been looking back at the legacy of the "War on Poverty," launched by Lyndon Johnson 50 years ago. The arsenal included government programs such as Head Start, food stamps and a push to increase the nation's minimum wage.

"We must extend the coverage of our minimum wage laws to more than 2 million workers now lacking this basic protection of purchasing power," Johnson said.

Low-wage workers actually saw their purchasing power peak while Johnson was in office. Adjusting for inflation, minimum wage workers earn less today than they did in the late 1960s.

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