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Latin America
9:35 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Under Government Pressure, Mexican Vigilantes Vow To Fight On

Civilian militia members stand guard in the town of Nueva Italia on Monday. Since a government crackdown last weekend, militia groups say they have laid down their weapons against drug traffickers.
Eduardo Verdugo AP

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 5:20 pm

After a week of fighting between civilian militias, drug traffickers and federal forces, there is a tense calm in the western Mexico state of Michoacan.

It's been the site of clashes between civilian militias defending themselves from ruthless drug traffickers, and federal forces trying to regain control.

For now, businesses are slowly reopening, school will restart on Monday, and the militias who took up arms have put down their weapons. It's unclear how long this fragile peace will last.

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Afghanistan
9:35 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Kabul Suicide Attack Kills 21 At Downtown Restaurant

At least 21 people — most of them foreigners — died when the Taliban struck a restaurant popular with Westerners in downtown Kabul on Friday. Two of them were Americans. It appeared to be a well-coordinated attack.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Not My Job: Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Gets Quizzed On The Future

Eric Levin Courtesy of Simon & Schuster

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 10:02 am

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin has written a series of presidential histories — covering Lyndon Johnson, Franklin Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy. Her book about Abraham Lincoln, Team of Rivals, helped inspire the movie Lincoln, and her latest book, The Bully Pulpit, is about Teddy Roosevelt.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Prediction

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 10:02 am

Our panelists predict, what will A-Rod do now he's not playing baseball?

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 10:02 am

All the news we couldn't fit anywhere else.

Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
9:33 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Limericks

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 10:02 am

Carl reads three news-related limericks: Melting tennis players; beard benefits; what your cat thinks of you.

The Two-Way
9:09 am
Sat January 18, 2014

India Reels Over Sudden Death Of Official's Wife

Shashi Tharoor listens to his wife Sunanda Pushkar at their wedding reception in New Delhi, India in 2010.
AP

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 2:21 pm

India is reeling after the death of Sunanda Pushkar, the wife of government minister Shashi Tharoor. As NPR's Julie McCarthy reports from New Delhi, Tharoor, who was a United Nations official for years, and his wife had been at the center of a social media scandal that grabbed national headlines.

Julie filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Tharoor, the flamboyant diplomat turned politician, found his wife Pushkar dead in a room at a luxury hotel in Delhi.

"The cause of death is under investigation.

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Reporter's Notebook
8:38 am
Sat January 18, 2014

In Appalachia, Poverty Is In The Eye Of The Beholder

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

President Lyndon B. Johnson went to eastern Kentucky in 1964 to promote his War on Poverty. But when he did, he opened a wound that remains raw today. People in the region say they're tired of always being depicted as poor, so when NPR's Pam Fessler went to Appalachia to report on how the War on Poverty is going, she was warned that people would be reluctant to talk. Instead, she got an earful.

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The Two-Way
7:36 am
Sat January 18, 2014

UPDATED: Student In Philadelphia School Shooting Surrenders

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 2:12 pm

Update at 4:10 p.m. ET. Student Surrenders:

A 17-year-old suspected in a shooting that injured two students at a Philadelphia school has turned himself over to police.

Philly.com reports:

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Around the Nation
7:31 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Donors Pitch In To Protect Detroit's Art And Pensions

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

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Author Interviews
7:09 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Living, And 'Forgiving,' In A Brilliant Writer's Orbit

Knopf

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

A lot of writers can be fairly easily stereotyped. They write stories about dysfunctional families, star crossed lovers, endearing losers; they write historical fiction, literary fiction or crime novels. But Jay Cantor's body of work defies categorization. His fiction has been inspired by topics as wide-ranging as the revolutionary life of Che Guevara and the comic strip world of Krazy Kat.

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The Two-Way
6:17 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Ukraine's President Approves Anti-Protest Law

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 12:43 pm

After weeks of demonstrations, Ukraine's President Viktor Yanukovych signed into law new regulations which he hopes will curb anti-government protests.

The Washington Post calls the new laws "draconian," prohibiting "almost any protest." The paper adds:

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Movies
6:01 am
Sat January 18, 2014

'Lunch' Gets Boxed Out: India's Oscar Pick Controversy

Through a delivery accident, Saajan Fernandes (Irrfhan Khan) begins a correspondence (and love affair) with a despondent housewife in The Lunchbox.
Courtesy of Sony Classics

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 3:58 pm

The nominations for the Oscars were announced this week, and while many of the big contenders, such as 12 Years A Slave and The Wolf of Wall Street, weren't a surprise, there were some controversies in different categories. Top among the film-world controversies was India's submission for best foreign language film, The Good Road, a drama about a truck driver in the western Indian state of Gujarat.

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NPR Story
6:01 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Countdown To The Super Bowl

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

NEARY: And then there were four. Tomorrow is the Sunday before the Sunday before the Super Bowl. And that means New England takes on Denver and San Francisco goes up against Seattle to see who's headed to the big game. NPR's Tom Goldman, who's caught in the middle of that San Fran-Seattle crossfire, joins us on the line from Portland. Good morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: I'm ducking here. Hiya, Lynn.

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NPR Story
6:01 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Ford's New Truck, GM's New CEO Star At Detroit Auto Show

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

The North American International Auto Show opens to the public today. That's the fancy name for the Detroit car show. NPR's Sonari Glinton has been getting a sneak preview in the Motor City, hanging out with engineers and auto execs. And he's with us now. Good to talk with you, Sonari.

SONARI GLINTON, BYLINE: It's good to be here, Lynn.

NEARY: Now, you've spent, I think, four days at the car show. What are the standouts?

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NPR Story
6:01 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Nigeria's New Anti-Gay Law A Harsh Reminder Of Global Attitudes

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Transcript

LYNN NEARY, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Lynn Neary. This week, it came out that Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan quietly signed into law one of the most repressive anti-gay measures in the world. The law punishes violators with up to 14 years in prison. The development got us thinking about just how difficult it is to be homosexual in so many different parts of the world. To hear more about this, we've reached Jonathan Cooper, the chief executive of the U.K.-based gay rights organization Human Dignity Trust. Thanks for joining us.

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Author Interviews
3:32 am
Sat January 18, 2014

One Last Tale Of The City In 'Anna Madrigal'

promo image

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Armistead Maupin's Tales of the City began as a newspaper serial in the 1970s, and grew into a beloved series of books that stand as a chronicle of life in the city of San Francisco. And it began in the decade after the Summer of Love, before anyone had ever heard of AIDS — now, it will end in the era of marriage equality.

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All Tech Considered
3:31 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Still Texting? OMG, That's Already So Old-School

A new report says old-fashioned texting is on the decline in Britain.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 11:31 am

If you have teenagers in your house, you may find this hard to believe, but texting is on the decline.

For the first time ever, traditional texting — the kind you do through your cell phone provider — has dropped in Britain. That's according to the annual technology predictions report from Deloitte, which reported that the number of text messages passed around by Brits decreased by 7 billion last year.

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Parallels
3:27 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Three Years After Uprisings, Arab States Take Different Paths

Supporters of Tunisia's secular Popular Front on Tuesday celebrate the third anniversary of the ouster of dictator Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. The country is on the verge of approving a new constitution that was negotiated by Islamist and secular political parties.
Anis Mili Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 7:57 am

Here's a snapshot of the Arab world on the third anniversary of its uprisings: Tunisians celebrated in the streets this month. Egyptians voted on a constitution that highlighted their bitter divisions. Beleaguered Syrians prayed that peace talks will bring an end to their nightmarish civil war.

The revolutionary fervor that gripped Arab nations in early 2011 has long since dissipated. All those that experienced uprisings have struggled to remake themselves and the prevailing mood across much of the region has been disappointment or worse.

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Sports
3:26 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Sibling Snowboarders Hope To Reach Olympics At The Same Time

Taylor Gold competes at the 2013 U.S. Snowboarding Grand Prix at Copper Mountain, Colo., one of the qualifying events for the U.S. team. His sister Arielle is also competing in the women's contest.
Sarah Brunson U.S. Snowboarding

Originally published on Sat January 18, 2014 9:35 am

Patty Gold may be the loudest spectator at the bottom of the half-pipe, with her cheers, gasps and the yelling of her children's names. She mostly stands perfectly still with her hands clasped to her face, waiting for scores, safe landings, and possibly medals.

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Afghanistan
2:42 am
Sat January 18, 2014

Restaurant Owner Loved The Patrons He Died Trying To Protect

Kamal Hamade, the owner of the Taverna du Liban, had taken many steps to make his restaurant secure, and it was one of the few that Western agencies allowed their personnel to frequent.
Rahmat Gul AP

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 6:04 am

Taverna du Liban was a welcome respite from the pressures of living in a third-world war zone.

The cozy, Kabul restaurant with its Middle Eastern décor served up a tasty variety of Lebanese dishes and the best chocolate cake I've ever eaten, courtesy of the Lebanese owner, Kamal Hamade, who baked the cakes himself.

But the appeal of Taverna — where I ate nearly every week when I lived in Afghanistan — was about much more than the food. It was about friendship.

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The Two-Way
2:05 am
Sat January 18, 2014

IMF, U.N. Staff Among 21 Killed In Kabul Restaurant Attack

Afghanistan security forces help an injured man from the scene of the attack, where at least 21 — mostly foreigners — were killed.
Massoud Hossaini AP

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 11:19 am

A suicide attack at a Kabul restaurant popular with foreign nationals killed at least 21 people on Friday, including the country director for the International Monetary Fund and four United Nations employees.

The attacker exploded a bomb at the restaurant gates, clearing the way for two gunmen to enter and start shooting indiscriminately, reports NPR's Sean Carberry. Afghan security forces killed the gunmen in a shootout.

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The Two-Way
6:29 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

California's Governor Declares Drought State Of Emergency

Gov. Jerry Brown holds a chart showing California's average precipitation as he declares a drought state of emergency for the state Friday. Brown asked residents to voluntarily reduce water usage by 20 percent.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Saying that his state must take steps to plan for prolonged water shortages, Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency over an extended drought Friday. California faces "water shortfalls in the driest year in recorded state history," according to the governor's office.

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The Two-Way
4:49 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Federal Judge Says N.C. Ultrasound Abortion Law Is Illegal

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 5:16 pm

A controversial North Carolina law requiring women who want to have an abortion to undergo an ultrasound scan is illegal, according to a federal judge's ruling issued Friday. The state's law required that the women have a medical professional tell them what the image depicts. It also said the women should "listen to the heartbeat of the unborn child."

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The Two-Way
4:26 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Supreme Court To Decide If Warrant Needed To Search Cellphone

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to decide if police can seize and look through a suspect's cellphone without getting a warrant. This photo shows women in Los Angeles using smartphones on Jan. 7.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. Supreme Court is delving into the technology-versus-privacy debate, agreeing to hear two cases that test whether police making an arrest may search cellphones without a warrant.

The court's announcement Friday that it would take the cases came just hours after President Obama outlined his proposals to address government retention of citizen phone data as part of his speech outlining reforms at the National Security Agency.

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It's All Politics
4:21 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

It's Happening: GOP Is Rallying Around Embattled N.J. Governor

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie addresses a Jan. 16 gathering of homeowners in Manahawkin, N.J., who were affected by last year's Superstorm Sandy.
Mel Evans AP

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 6:21 pm

Subpoenas are hitting his closest aides and allies. His approval rating in New Jersey has taken a modest hit. And suddenly, politicians long afraid of him are speaking out about his revenge-style of governing.

But headed into a three-day weekend, there's some good news for Christie. The conservative base of the Republican Party, long skeptical of the New Jersey governor because of his bro-hug with President Obama after Sandy, is beginning to rally to his side. Here's some evidence:

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Politics
4:20 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

5 Takeaways From The President's NSA Speech

President Barack Obama talks about National Security Agency surveillance Jan. 17 at the Justice Department in Washington. Seeking to calm a furor over U.S. surveillance, the president called for ending the government's control of phone data from hundreds of millions of Americans and immediately ordered intelligence agencies to get a secretive court's permission before accessing the records.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 5:21 pm

What does it mean when lawmakers as different as Colorado Democratic Senator Mark Udall and New York Republican Rep. Peter King offer praise for the president's long-awaited speech on surveillance reforms?

Mostly that resolution to the biggest controversies after leaks by NSA contractor Edward Snowden has been put off — or pushed to working groups in the executive branch and the lawmakers themselves.

Still, the president's NSA reforms speech Friday offered a revealing look into the nation's phone data collection program and the direction of the surveillance policy debate.

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It's All Politics
4:01 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Congress Vows To Step Up To Surveillance Policy Challenge

National Security Agency Director Gen. Keith Alexander and Rep. Peter King, R-N.Y., after President Obama's speech.
Charles Dharapak AP

If there was a consensus emanating from Congress Friday after President Obama's NSA reform speech, it was — not surprisingly — that Congress itself has a major role to play in the ultimate fix.

Whether from strong NSA supporters or agency critics, the reactions sounded similar: Congress intends to do much of the steering in the drive to overhaul the NSA's gathering of certain non-public information, especially consumer phone records, in the nation's counterterrorism efforts.

Even so, if you listened closely, you could hear the sound of politics in some of the reaction.

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The Two-Way
3:39 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

Obama Signs Trillion-Dollar Federal Spending Bill

President Obama signed the $1.1 trillion spending bill into law Friday afternoon, enacting more than 1,500 pages of legislation that received broad support in the House and Senate earlier this week. The expansive bill ensures the U.S. government won't face a potential shutdown until at least October.

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This Week's Must Read
3:28 pm
Fri January 17, 2014

For Cheating Husbands, A Little Dose Of Revenge

cover detail

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 4:20 pm

Sarah Wendell is the author of the book, Everything I Know about Love I Learned from Romance Novels. She is also the cofounder of the romance-reviewing website, smartbitchestrashybooks.com.

With French President Francois Hollande the focus of international headlines for cheating on his partner, Valerie Trierweiler — who is in the hospital due to the shock — a happy resolution to their problems seems unlikely.

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