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Medical Treatments
5:51 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Fear Of Addiction Means Chronic Pain Goes Untreated

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The debate on approving new drugs to treat pain can sometimes get as polarized as abortion or drunk gun control as the number of people who become addicted or who have died from overdoses of legal painkillers increases. Several states are now trying to ban Zo-hydro, the newest FDA-approved painkiller. If you're a patient from who suffers from chronic pain and live in a state with regulatory barriers, it can be nearly impossible to get a doctor to prescribe anything for long-term relief.

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat April 26, 2014

For Binchy Fans, One Last Trip Down 'Chestnut Street'

There may be no real Chestnut Street in Dublin, but Maeve Binchy made readers feel as if it might be around any corner. Best-selling author Binchy, who died in 2012, was famous for novels which intertwined the lives, loves and relationships of her mostly Irish characters with a lyrical, yet accessible writing style. And Chestnut Street, her last book, is a collection of short stories about those characters, loosely connected by their common setting on the titular street

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All Tech Considered
3:28 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Tech Week: Look At The Cloud, Aereo In Court, Net Neutrality

Paul Hopkins of DuPont Fabros stands on the roof of company's newest Silicon Valley data center. "It's about the same size and length as a Nimitz aircraft carrier," he says.
Steve Henn NPR

It was another busy week in the technology and society space, so we'll dive right into your weekly roundup:

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Parallels
3:27 am
Sat April 26, 2014

Syria Gives Up Chemical Weapons ... But A War Rages On

A Syrian woman cries as she leaves a residential block in Aleppo, Syria, reportedly hit by an explosives-filled barrel dropped by a government forces helicopter on March 18.
Khaled Khatib AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 9:30 am

Sunday is the deadline for Syrian President Bashar Assad to hand over his government's chemical weapons stockpile, and he will have surrendered the vast majority of his declared arsenal.

Some call this a triumph. Others say Assad used the deal to buy time for brutal offensives in the civil war raging through the country. Western governments are investigating reports of more chemical attacks, although Russian officials said Friday that Assad's forces did not use chemical weapons.

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The Two-Way
6:58 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Detroit Retiree Panel Reaches Deal With The City On Pension

A panel convened by a federal court to represent the interests of retirees in Detroit's bankruptcy says it has reached a deal with the city.

Reuters reports the deal would cap retirees' pension losses and call for more contributions to their health benefits.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:59 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Not My Job: Ballerina Misty Copeland Gets Quizzed On Morris Dancing

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:25 am

Ballerina Misty Copeland is one of the greatest dancers performing today; she's a soloist at the American Ballet Theater, and she's accomplished all this despite starting ballet at the age of 13. By that age, most kids who dream of dancing have already given it up and resigned themselves to a career in public radio.

We've invited Copeland to play a game called "Hey Nonny Nonny" — three questions about a form of English folk dancing called Morris dancing, which scholars believe originated one night in the Middle Ages when some guys got really, really drunk.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:34 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Prediction

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:25 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now, panel, what will be the next vice to modernize? Brian Babylon?

BRIAN BABYLON: Cocaine will be rebranded Adderall Extreme.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Kyrie O'Connor?

O'CONNOR: Oh, this is actually a good thing - robot cockfighting.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Roy Blount Jr.?

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:34 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Lightning Fill In The Blank

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:25 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

Now onto our final game, Lightning Fill in the Blank. Each of our players will have 60 seconds in which they can answer as many fill in the blank questions as they can. Each correct answer now worth two points. Carl, can you give us the scores?

CARL KASELL, BYLINE: Brian Babylon has the lead, Peter. Has three points. Kyrie O'Connor and Roy Blount Jr. are tied for second. Each has two.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:34 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Limericks

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 8:25 am

Transcript

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

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The Two-Way
4:15 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Jewish Man Who Became Radical Islamist Sentenced To Prison

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 4:37 pm

Yousef al-Khattab, a Jewish kid from New Jersey who turned into a radical Islamist, was sentenced to 2 1/2 years in prison on Friday.

As NPR's Dina Temple-Raston reported earlier today, al-Khattab is the founder of a radical Islamist group called Revolution Muslim, "which became a gateway for young jihadists in the U.S. looking to join violent Islamist groups overseas."

Dina continued:

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NPR Story
4:09 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Sabiduría: Ruben Salazar

Ruben Salazar chronicled the Chicano rights struggle in Los Angeles during the 1960's. The legendary journalist imparts wisdom on a life featured in the documentary Ruben Salazar: Man in the Middle.

NPR Story
4:09 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Space Camp!

Some people want to be astronauts and space engineers. Others who just love space find a way to make it a part of their lives. Peter Gianoukis volunteers as a NASA Space Camp Ambassador.

NPR Story
4:09 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Latinos in Space

Astronauts Ellen Ochoa and Jose Hernandez captured the imaginations of many Latinos who dreamed of going to space. Latinos also contributed to space exploration...like engineer Candy Torres.

Politics
3:29 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Pay-To-Play Laws Celebrate 20th Anniversary

Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during an April 17 news conference in New York.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

While the Supreme Court this month took another step in freeing up big political donors, another set of federal restrictions on political money is celebrating its 20th anniversary. The so-called pay-to-play rules — enforced by the Securities and Exchange Commission — are a narrow but powerful way to control political cash.

Think "pay to play" and you might think of video games or high school sports. But in politics, "pay to play" refers to something totally different — a particular kind of political corruption.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

For New York, The '10-Year Storm' Isn't What It Used To Be

Sandbags protect the front of the New York Stock Exchange on Oct. 29, 2012, in preparation for Hurricane Sandy.
Richard Drew AP

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 3:51 pm

New York City is 20 times more likely to flood during a storm than it was in the mid-1800s, partly owing to sea-level rise linked to global climate change, according to a new study.

The maximum water height at New York Harbor during storms such as Hurricane Sandy has risen nearly 2.5 feet since 1844, says the study, which was published in a recent issue of Geophysical Research Letters.

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The Salt
3:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Rum Renaissance Revives The Spirit's Rough Reputation

Ian Burrell, a rum ambassador from the U.K., samples the liquor at the Miami Rum Festival.
Tatu Kaarlas Courtesy of Miami Rum Festival

Originally published on Tue April 29, 2014 9:31 am

There was a time when rum was considered rotgut. Blackbeard the pirate liked to mix his cane alcohol with gunpowder and light it — rum and croak.

Fast-forward a few centuries to rum respectability — specifically, to Rob Burr's patio deck in Coral Gables, in South Florida.

From the waterfall pond to the tiki bar, Burr's deck sets a mood not for swilling rum, but for tasting it. Not the way spring-breakers chug Captain Morgan, but the way cognac drinkers sip Napoleon: Not with Coke (or gunpowder) but neat, in a snifter.

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Media
3:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

So Much For Scoops: Newspapers Turn To Data-Crunching And Context

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Verticals, context blogs, explainers, those are the buzzwords of the news business. From some of the nation's oldest papers to the newest digital news startups, there's a rush to create sites that emphasize context rather than good old-fashioned scoops. The focus now is to blend fresh writing, number crunching and striking graphics. NPR's David Folkenflik reports on this evolution.

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All Tech Considered
2:23 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

You Love The Cloud, But It May Not Be As Secure As You Think

If you're storing your digital belongings in the cloud, you should know you're giving up some rights.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

People are storing more and more stuff online: photos, music, personal documents — even books. The business of cloud storage is growing 30 percent a year, Forrester Research says. But if you're storing your digital belongings in the cloud, you should know you're giving up some rights.

A year ago, I talked to Kyle Goodwin about one of those scary computer moments — he was saving important videos from his business to an external hard drive.

"Right in the middle of a save, I knocked it off my coffee table and it hit the floor and it's destroyed," he said.

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Author Interviews
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

For Concentration Camp Doctor, A Lifetime Of Eluding Justice

Nazi SS doctor Aribert Heim continued practicing medicine for years after World War II, until his secret concentration camp past returned and he fled to Cairo.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Aribert Heim was a Nazi doctor at the Mauthausen concentration camp. He gained notoriety there for operating on healthy patients, often killing them painfully in the process. Heim, however, evaded prosecution after World War II, spending the last 30 years of his life on the run and ultimately dying in Cairo in 1992. Nicholas Kulish, co-author of The Eternal Nazi, tells the story.

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Politics
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Politicians Get Personal With Memorable Early Campaign Ads

Dr. Monica Wehby, a Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Oregon, appears in the much-talked-about campaign ad "Trust."
Dr. Monica Wehby Senate campaign

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

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Commentary
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Week In Politics: Middle East Peace Talks And Ukraine Offensive

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Joining us now, political columnists David Brooks of the New York Times and E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution. Hello to both of you.

DAVID BROOKS: Hello.

E.J. DIONNE: Good to be with you.

SIEGEL: And first, briefly since you both talked about Ukraine here just last Friday, does some kind of soft landing seem possible to you there and does President Obama's leadership strike you as effective in leading the Western response to Russia? David, you first.

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Latin America
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

A Postcard From Rio, Where World Cup Readiness Remains Uncertain

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Soccer fans are counting down. Forty-seven days to go until the World Cup in Brazil. The country is in the news again but not for the reasons it might want. In one of the key host cities, Rio de Janeiro, riots broke out in a major tourist area earlier this week. Big questions over the readiness of stadiums and infrastructure also remain. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is our South America correspondent, and she's with us today in our D.C. studios. Lourdes, nice to have you here.

LOURDES GARCIA-NAVARRO, BYLINE: It's great to be here.

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Business
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

After Everest Tragedy, Who Pays When Climbing Season's Suspended?

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

The short climbing season on Mount Everest ended suddenly and sadly. The avalanche that killed 16 guides last Friday has shaken the Sherpa community and many have left the mountain. As a result, most expedition companies have cancelled their climbs. NPR's Julie McCarthy has more from Kathmandu on the next chapter, who pays when the season is suspended?

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News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Obama Offers Support And Condolences In Somber South Korea

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. In South Korea today, President Obama consoled a nation in mourning over the victims of a ferry disaster. He also assured South Koreans that the U.S. is committed to support and defend the country in the face of North Korea's threats to test yet another nuclear device. NPR's Anthony Kuhn has been following the president in Seoul and joins us to talk about the trip.

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Europe
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Heated Words On Air Often Don't Match Events On Ground In Ukraine

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. The government in Kiev accused the Kremlin today of trying to start another world war. This comes as a team of unarmed military observers in Ukraine is said to have been detained by pro-Moscow militants. The group is made up of representatives from several European countries. They've been monitoring growing tensions in eastern Ukraine.

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Shots - Health News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Family Tree Of Pertussis Traced, Could Lead To Better Vaccine

False-color transmission electron micrograph of a field of whooping cough bacteria, Bordetella pertussis.
A. Barry Dowsett Science Source

Originally published on Mon April 28, 2014 5:51 am

Whooping cough was once one of the leading killers of babies around the world. Now that it's largely controlled with a vaccine, scientists have had a chance to figure out how the disease came into being in the first place.

That story is told in a study published online this week in the journal mBio. And it turns out that whooping cough arose quite late in human history.

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Education
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Wash. Loses 'No Child Left Behind' Waiver Over Teacher Evaluations

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Washington has become the first state to lose its waiver to the No Child Left Behind Act. Most states have waivers to some of the more stringent requirements of the 2001 federal law but those waivers come with conditions. As NPR's Martin Kaste reports, Washington is being punished because it didn't fulfill a condition that is very dear to the Obama administration.

MARTIN KASTE, BYLINE: What the administration wants is simple. Teachers should be evaluated, in part, on how their students do on standardized tests.

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News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Northwestern Players Cast Union Vote — But Results Will Have To Wait

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

It's a historic day on the campus of Northwestern University. Football players there became the first college athletes in this country to vote on whether to unionize. The results may not be known for some time. The National Labor Relations Board is reviewing Northwestern's appeal of an earlier ruling to allow this union vote to take place. NPR's David Schaper reports.

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Around the Nation
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Memories, And Mended Reputation, Reclaimed From Century-Old Wreckage

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Ocean scientists in California have solved the mystery of the San Francisco Bay. More than a century ago, two ships collided, 16 people were killed. One ship sank and it remained on the bottom of the bay. It's exact location was unknown until now. And as NPR's Richard Gonzales reports, it was an accident that reignited racial divisions of that era.

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News
2:22 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Columbia Comes Under Fire For Handling Of Sexual Assault Cases

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 5:15 pm

Twenty-three students from Columbia and Barnard say that the university is mishandling allegations of sexual assault. They filed federal complaints with the Department of Education on Thursday.

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