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Europe
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

The Catchy Songs Of Eurovision Transcend Europe's Divided Politics

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:44 am

Eurovision: Love it, hate it, or have no idea what we're talking about? With tensions high in Ukraine, Russian performers are facing the music at the kitschy singing contest.

Television
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Welsh Actor Keeps Soviet Secrets In 'The Americans'

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:30 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Phillip Jennings runs a travel agency with his wife Elizabeth. They've got two kids. They live in a quiet suburb of Washington, D.C. circa 1981. Like so many two-career couples, it can be a struggle to juggle career and family life.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE AMERICANS")

KERI RUSSELL: (As Elizabeth Jennings) If this goes bad, you need to be out of town somewhere with the kids. Get the kids to Canada. Contact the rezidentura there.

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Movie Interviews
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Looking 'Under The Table' At The Reluctant Modern Family

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:22 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

OK, film idea now - Park Avenue family waits for Nell, their college-aged daughter, to come home for Thanksgiving. They've got Obama bumper stickers on the fridge and literature on their bookshelves that proclaims their liberal convictions. They're eager to meet the boyfriend they're expecting Nell to bring home. All is in place when...

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "UNDER THE TABLE")

JACKIE VISCUSI: (As Nell) Mom, hi, Happy Thanksgiving. This is Laura, my girlfriend.

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Latin America
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Mexican Vigilantes Keep Arms Despite Deadline

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:28 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Mexican authorities have given vigilantes in the western state of Michoacan a deadline. By today, they've got to register their arms and either store them away or join an official police force.

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Africa
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

How Much Can The U.S. Do For Kidnapped Nigerian Girls?

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. More than 250 Nigerian schoolgirls remain missing after being kidnapped by the terrorist group Boko Haram. The Nigerian government has faced criticism for being slow to react to the crime. And this week, the U.S. said it would send a small team of advisers to Nigeria as will the U.K., China and France. President Goodluck Jonathan thanked the international community at the World Economic Forum on Thursday.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Asia
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Chinese Find Number URLs Easier Than Letters

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:44 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. A lot of Chinese websites seem to have a different form of URLs or web addresses. They use numbers not the names, long numbers too, seemingly at random. McDonald's website isn't spelled McDonald's, it's 4008-517-517.cn. A dating website is 5201314.com. Why? Christopher Beam, staff writer with The New Republic who lives in Beijing, wondered and that's when he began to notice that the numbers are hardly random. Mr. Beam joins us from Beijing. Thanks very much for being with us.

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Europe
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Russia's Independent Media All But Silenced

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:25 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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Europe
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

On Eve Of Referendum, Many Fear For Ukrainian Economy

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 4:27 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Separatists in eastern Ukraine are asking voters to take part in an unauthorized referendum tomorrow on whether to make their region independent. Many Ukrainians believe that a yes vote will lead Russia to annex their territory as in Crimea. This latest referendum comes at a time of heightened tensions.

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Music Interviews
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

The Music Of Oak And Forest Sprite Blend In Sylvan Esso

Originally published on Wed May 14, 2014 3:28 pm

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PLAY IT RIGHT")

MOUNTAIN MAN: (Singing) When the sounds come together so close to my face...

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A few years ago, Amelia Meath's folksy group Mountain Man recorded this song, called "Play It Right." Then a chance encounter with an electronic music producer named Nick Sanborn led to this.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "PLAY IT RIGHT")

MOUNTAIN MAN: (Singing) Play it right. Play it right. Play it right. Play it right. Play it right. Play it right...

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Sports
5:59 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Michael Sam Waiting For An Invite In NFL Draft Spectacle

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:44 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

And, by the way, BG Lederman didn't write a single one of those songs. But he does write our theme music, including this one that says it's time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: Post season - sorry, basketball. Forget about it, hockey. For theatrics, we're watching football's off season. The spectacle that is the NFL draft enters its third day today and America wants to know, can it be as good as the Kevin Costner film? NPR's Tom Goldman joins us - any Kevin Costner film. Thanks for being with us, Tom.

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The Two-Way
5:51 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Michelle Obama: Nigerian Girls 'Embody The Best Hope For The Future'

Michelle Obama tweeted this picture of herself on May 7, in support of the kidnapped Nigerian girls.
Michelle Obama

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:48 am

In her first solo weekly address, first lady Michelle Obama said the U.S. is committed to standing up for the more than 200 Nigerian girls who were kidnapped from their school weeks ago.

"In these girls, Barack and I see our own daughters," she said. "We see their hopes and their dreams — and we can only imagine the anguish their parents are feeling right now."

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Book Reviews
5:03 am
Sat May 10, 2014

A Fractured Tale Of Time, War And A Really Big Diamond

No book I've read all year underscores the distinctions between the long form and the short story more than the award-winning story writer Anthony Doerr's new novel All the Light We Cannot See.

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Author Interviews
5:03 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Questions For Earl Swift, Author Of 'Auto Biography'

Earl Swift traced the history of this '57 Chevy wagon and all of its owners — here it is, rusting quietly on the lot of owner number 13, Tommy Arney, in January 2010.
Earl Swift

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 3:16 pm

This '57 Chevy station wagon was once pristine, the epitome of American automotive glory: two-tone green, with sweeping fins and enough chrome to blind pedestrians. But by the time journalist Earl Swift came across it, those days were gone, and it was subsiding gently into a heap of rust and torn upholstery.

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Parallels
4:22 am
Sat May 10, 2014

How Loud Is Too Loud? A High-Decibel Debate On Expanding Heathrow

British schoolchildren outside an adobe hut that was built so they could play in a less noisy place when jets fly overhead. The kids go to school near London's Heathrow Airport, where a planes takeoff and land every 90 seconds.
Matt Dunham AP

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:44 am

Pippins Primary School is just one of dozens of schools in the neighborhoods that surround London's Heathrow Airport. At recess the students play outside on an asphalt playground. And like clockwork, a jet roars just several hundred feet overhead every 90 seconds. The school is almost directly under Heathrow's flight path.

"It is very loud. It's as if you were standing on the runways," said Janet Mills, a teacher at Pippins. Heathrow is one of the world's busiest airports, and every day Mills faces the challenge of teaching right next door to it.

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All Tech Considered
4:07 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Tech Week: Target CEO Out, Drones In Question, Apple's Big Deal

Beats headphones are sold alongside iPods in an Apple store in New York City. Apple is reportedly considering buying Beats for more than $3 billion.
Andrew Burton Getty Images

Another week in tech is wrapping up with talk of another multi-billion dollar buy. Let's get to it with our roundup, starting with the ICYMI section, which features stories we've been telling on air and online, the Big Conversations in tech and closing with our Curiosities — other fun links you should see.

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Code Switch
4:04 am
Sat May 10, 2014

With Great Korean Barbecue Comes Great Responsibility

As far as stock images go, this one of Korean barbecue seems pretty tasty.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 9:41 am

Go hunting for the best barbecue in America and you might end up in a city that surprises you: Los Angeles. Specifically, the L.A. neighborhood known as Koreatown.

I'm talking about Korean barbecue. If you're unfamiliar, that's thinly sliced, marinated meat grilled right in front of you. Trust me, it's awesome (this guy knows what I'm talking about).

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The Salt
4:03 am
Sat May 10, 2014

Bridging The Cultural Gap With A Mother-In-Law In The Kitchen

Lisa Brown for NPR

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 12:17 pm

In Indian kitchens, patience is a virtue.

Vegetables must be chopped, lentils soaked, spices roasted and ground before slowly simmering everything together. If you try to cut corners, the food just isn't the same.

The same is true for some relationships.

My mother-in-law, Rama Saini, grew up in north India in the early years after independence from the British. At age 19, her marriage was arranged and she moved to Canada with her husband. By 30 she had three children and a thriving business.

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It's All Politics
3:58 am
Sat May 10, 2014

The Congresswoman Whose Husband Called Her Home

Rep. Coya Knutson (D-Minn.), is shown shopping in a supermarket in 1955 following her demand to know why her fellow housewives remain saddled with high grocery bills while farm income continues to drop.
Maurice Johnson Bettmann/Corbis

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 6:06 am

Fifty-six years ago this weekend, newspapers across the nation told a sad tale of a family seemingly imploding.

At the center of the story was Coya Knutson, the opera-singing daughter of a Norwegian farmer, and the first woman from Minnesota elected to Congress.

Voted in on her own merits, not appointed to keep a late husband's seat warm for a successor, the trailblazing mother could only watch as vengeful party rivals, a manufactured scandal, and a feckless, alcoholic husband combined to sabotage her career.

It all came to a head on the eve of Mother's Day 1958.

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The Two-Way
3:45 am
Sat May 10, 2014

'Senior Black Correspondent' Larry Wilmore Takes Colbert Slot

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 7:24 am

But will he pronounce the T in "Report?"

Larry Wilmore, The Daily Show's "senior black correspondent," will take over the 11:30 p.m. slot on Comedy Central after Stephen Colbert leaves for CBS at the end of the year.

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It's All Politics
6:21 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

New Rules Aim To Streamline GOP's 2016 Nominating Process

The RNC wants to see many fewer of these presidential debate scenes in 2016. Before a November 2011 Michigan showdown, from left: former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum; Minnesota Rep. Michele Bachmann; former House Speaker Newt Gingrich; former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney; businessman Herman Cain; Texas Gov. Rick Perry; Texas Rep. Ron Paul; former Utah Gov. Jon Huntsman.
Paul Sancya AP

If there are other Herman Cains and Michele Bachmanns out there with 2016 presidential hopes, it may be much harder than it was in 2012 for them to go from "who?" to Republican presidential contenders. That's because of new rules adopted Friday by the Republican National Committee at its meeting in Memphis, Tenn.

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The Two-Way
4:27 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Judge Strikes Down Arkansas Ban On Gay Marriage

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 4:45 pm

A judge in Arkansas has struck down the state's ban on same-sex marriage, a move that clears the way for gay couples to wed.

Here's the judge's order, via Chris Johnson, chief political and White House reporter for the Washington Blade.

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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:19 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Not My Job: Brat Pack Member Rob Lowe Gets Quizzed On Bratwurst

Larry Busacca Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 8:49 am

Rob Lowe and Peter Sagal are about the same age, and have led very similar lives: They've both made it huge in show business, been staples of the gossip magazines, are known far and wide for their strangely youthful good looks.

Back in the '80s Lowe was part of Hollywood's Brat Pack so we've invited him to answer three questions about some of the lesser known facts of bratwurst.

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Education
4:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Under Restructured Rules, Kansas Teachers Lose Tenure

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 6:45 pm

Kansas lawmakers have passed a bill to make it easier to fire teachers. The legislation will take away some of the employment protections offered to teachers. Supporters say school administrators need the flexibility to remove teachers who aren't performing, but as Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda reports, teachers argue this will allow them to be fired for unfair reasons.

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Books
3:47 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

In A Changing Climate, Science Fiction Starts To Feel Real

cover detail
Courtesy Night Shade Books

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 2:17 pm

The White House released a report this week on the impacts of global warming. Many places are already feeling the effects. There's drought in the Southwest, rising sea levels in Miami, and now even fictional worlds are feeling the burn.

There have been novels about climate change since the 1960's, but to me the definitive example is a book that's not well known outside the field of science fiction: The Windup Girl, by the American novelist Paolo Bacigalupi, which won both the Hugo and the Nebula Awards in 2010.

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Movie Interviews
3:47 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

In 'God's Pocket,' There's A Mad Man Behind The Camera

John Slattery (left) reprises his role as Roger Sterling in the seventh and final season of Mad Men.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of AMC

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 6:45 pm

The 1980s novel God's Pocket, by Pete Dexter, is a story of hapless drunks, construction workers and one washed-up newspaper columnist. The book takes its name from a fictional blue-collar neighborhood in Philadelphia.

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The Two-Way
3:23 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Home-Wrecker: Woman Doesn't Like Neighbors, Demolishes Their Home

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 4:51 pm

When Ana Maria Moreta Folch had issues with her neighbors, she did what most of us would. Scratch that. She had their mobile home demolished.

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Shots - Health News
3:20 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Europeans Are Getting Fatter, Just Like Americans

Fried cod awaits its destiny as fish and chips in London.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Ireland is predicted to become the fattest country in Europe by 2030, according to a study released by the World Health Organization and the UK Health Forum.

As many as 90 percent of Irish men and 84 percent of Irish women are projected to be classified as overweight or obese by then. Blame goes to the usual culprits: unhealthy diets high in sugar and fats, and a lack of exercise.

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Shots - Health News
3:06 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO

U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Scoggin gets a vaccination against smallpox in 2003 at Camp Pendleton in California — one of the final steps before deployment overseas.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 6:45 pm

The World Health Organization is revisiting a question that's been the subject of intense debate for decades: whether to destroy the only known samples of the smallpox virus.

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It's All Politics
2:39 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Why The Benghazi Committee Is A Rare Win-Win-Win For Congress

House Rules Committee member Rep. Virginia Foxx, R-N.C., is flanked by Chairman Pete Sessions, R-Texas (left), and Rep. Rob Bishop, R-Utah (right), as the panel works May 7 on the creation of a special select committee to investigate the 2012 attack on the U.S. diplomatic outpost in Benghazi, Libya, that killed the ambassador and three other Americans.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 3:20 pm

As hopeful Republicans anticipate how their new select committee will get the Benghazi issue a full airing, and as Democrats gnash their teeth at what they're calling a political stunt, here's another possible scenario: It won't make much difference either way.

The new committee has subpoena power — just like the House Oversight Committee, which has already been investing Benghazi. The new committee will be able to look at classified material — just like the House Intelligence Committee, which has also been investigating Benghazi.

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Africa
2:39 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Nigerian Kidnapping Highlights Scale Of Child Trafficking In Africa

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 6:45 pm

Nearly 300 schoolgirls remain missing in Nigeria. For more information on the pervasiveness of child slavery in Africa, Robert Siegel speaks with Benjamin Lawrance, the Barber B. Conable Jr. Endowed Chair in International Studies at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

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